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the great vegetarian debate - Page 26 - Dhamma Wheel

the great vegetarian debate

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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Annapurna
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Re: Are you S.A.D.?

Postby Annapurna » Sat Mar 27, 2010 8:25 am

http://www.schmuckzauberei.blogspot.com/

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BubbaBuddhist
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Re: Are you S.A.D.?

Postby BubbaBuddhist » Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:50 am

Alas, my wife works midnight shift, so we're on two completely different schedules. Meals together are scarce. However, me and Lady Cat eat our meals together. :lol: Actually, she often eats much of my meal as well as hers.

J
Author of Redneck Buddhism: or Will You Reincarnate as Your Own Cousin?

alan
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Re: Standard American Diet (S.A.D.)

Postby alan » Thu Apr 01, 2010 2:25 pm

"Fast food nation" is a great book--you'll never look at your Big Mac the same way again. It's also very entertaining. Put it on your list if you are interested in this subject. It doesn't delve into nutrition so much as documenting the rise of mass food producers, food as entertainment, and the impact, both socially and economically, on America (and by extension the rest of the world, as consumer culture marches relentlessly onward). Fascinating!

A lot of what Pollan says makes sense, but not all. "Myth #4" is an easy example. He's overlooking the fact that the science of nutrition is relatively new (and still emerging from the heavy hand of industry propaganda/suppression). Fact is, transformed fats have been proven beyond a doubt to be always bad, all the time.

meindzai
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Re: Standard American Diet (S.A.D.)

Postby meindzai » Thu Apr 01, 2010 4:10 pm


alan
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Re: Standard American Diet (S.A.D.)

Postby alan » Thu Apr 01, 2010 5:33 pm

Do you really believe that the food processing industry does not influence published studies?
And that these studies will be needlessly complicated, with the goal of confusing the public?
Our species has been fine, up to these last 70 years or so, when we have not been fine. I blame it on the food industry and those who have become complacent.
Edit: I originally misquoted your statement about trans fats. More on that subject later.

meindzai
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Re: Standard American Diet (S.A.D.)

Postby meindzai » Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:37 pm


alan
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Re: Standard American Diet (S.A.D.)

Postby alan » Fri Apr 02, 2010 12:57 pm

I think we'd both agree our woes are caused by processed food. I would add that although news reports do get sensationalized, we can go check the facts ourselves. I'm happy to know that berries are good. I'm very happy to know that some things are absolutely bad, like trans fats.

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Vardali
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Re: Standard American Diet (S.A.D.)

Postby Vardali » Fri Apr 02, 2010 3:26 pm

I grew up pretty much the same way that Annabel described; however, I always hated it ;) Eating sociably on special occasions or when going out now and then is fun, but on a day-to-day routine I prefer solitary meals. Probably because I tend to overeat in social settings while not having this problem when I can fully attend to my meals ;)

And I agree with the recommendation to avoid processed food as
much as possible, but overall, it seems a good idea to stay away from all sorts of food/health/dietary "state of the art" discussions. I might be biased, but having seen my brother and his family - who are severely ovrerweiht/obese - struggle with (largely unsuccessful) weight-loss
programmes for almost 3 decades now, I feel to keep things simple and to follow both body signals and food preferances (sometimes in spite of "expert advise") has worked way
better for me than all this medical and scientific guidance that has "supported" my brother's family.

Interestingly enough, my preferance has always been on a diet without cooking (sandwich style ;) ).
Unless it is Thai,Chinese or Indian cuisine, I just love that :D

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Annapurna
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Re: Are you S.A.D.?

Postby Annapurna » Fri Apr 02, 2010 3:52 pm

http://www.schmuckzauberei.blogspot.com/

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Refugee
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Re: Poll: Are you vegetarian/vegan?

Postby Refugee » Sun May 16, 2010 9:19 am

Well... I'm coming quite late to this thread... just discovered it now!

I am a lay Buddhist who is not a vegetarian. According to the (Theravada) Buddhist scriptures, it is not a prerequisite for a person to be a vegetarian to be a Buddhist. Even the Buddha abandoned the meatless diet he followed while an ascetic, soon after enlightenment. So, the Buddha was not a vegetarian, and neither did he ever ask any of his disciples, monks or laity, to be vegetarians. Considering that the Buddha's emphasis was on the avoidance of killing (first precept), one can ask: Is it worst to swat a mosquito – an immediate act of killing – than to eat the carcass of an already dead animal? How many of householders can totally abstain from killing vermin and pests?

So, a lay vegetarian must be very wary of feelings of judgemental moral superiority if s/he cannot at the same time also strictly keep the first precept. This is what informs my dietary practice, with due regard being had to my personal and family responsibilities. The circumstances of other lay persons, I'm sure, will be quite different from mine. It probably boils down to personal circumstances and choices.

I always show great respect for the noble actions of vegetarians, and vegans in particular. Vegetarianism may not be something the Buddha taught to his disciples, but it is nonetheless compatible with the Dhamma in terms of loving-kindness and compassion. So, to those who are vegetarians, I say well done! :twothumbsup:
:anjali:
My practice is simply this: Avoid evil, do good, and purify the mind.

Shonin
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Re: Poll: Are you vegetarian/vegan?

Postby Shonin » Sun May 16, 2010 9:36 am

The principle I use is suffering. Am I creating suffering by consuming this food? If an animal was made to live and/or was slaughtered in a way that (as far as I can tell) is likely to have increased suffering then I won't buy it. That means I don't eat battery farmed eggs, or intensively farmed dairy products or any product that contains them (and you might be surprised how many products that is). On the other hand, I will eat meat from animals which are culled humanely since the alternative would be that those populations will be kept in check by disease, starvation and predators anyway.

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Refugee
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Re: Poll: Are you vegetarian/vegan?

Postby Refugee » Sun May 16, 2010 10:11 am

Hi Shonin,

Even though I'm not a vegetarian, I apply restraint and mindfulness with regard to the type and quantity of meat products I consume. The principles I apply is quite similar, albeit not identical, to the principles you use. Thanks for your post - it kinda rounds off my previous posting. :thanks:

Kind regards,
Refugee
My practice is simply this: Avoid evil, do good, and purify the mind.

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Wind
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So I gave vegetarianism a try and..

Postby Wind » Fri May 21, 2010 6:23 am

So I decided to try total vegetarian diet for as long as I could. I went several days and then I noticed i was more hungry than usual. My energy level seems to drop. Maybe I am not eating the right food perhaps but I had to concede my defeat as my hunger seems to be so frequent and it felt like my body is not getting the nutrients it needs.

I applaud everyone who is able to succeed. Hopefully one day I could do it too.

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retrofuturist
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Re: So I gave vegetarianism a try and..

Postby retrofuturist » Fri May 21, 2010 6:26 am

Greetings,

I agree it's not as filling, but it's also not as fatty.

Last night my wife made nachos and it was basically flavoured mince, corn chips and cheese. It seemed so heavy, and I couldn't eat much. Yet, afterwards I was not hungry.

Often vitamin supplements are needed to complement a vegetarian diet - if you're willing to try again, perhaps you should consult your doctor, maybe get a blood test and such.

Metta,
Retro. :)
"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

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Wind
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Re: So I gave vegetarianism a try and..

Postby Wind » Fri May 21, 2010 6:35 am


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pilgrim
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Re: So I gave vegetarianism a try and..

Postby pilgrim » Fri May 21, 2010 6:54 am

I think there is sufficient value in just reducing meat consumption significantly and replacing that with veggies. What value is there in being 100% vegetarian other than being able to say that? :thinking:

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Dan74
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Re: So I gave vegetarianism a try and..

Postby Dan74 » Fri May 21, 2010 6:54 am

For me it was a pretty gradual process (I had been reducing meat for a while) so it hasn't been difficult. But I can imagine go "cold turkey" (pardon the pun) could be tough. (mind you I still occasionally pick a piece from my kids leftovers before chucking them into the bin :embarassed: - they still have meat).

Which kind of brings up a question - is there such a thing as "ethical meat"? Such as leftovers, animals that are culled for environmental reasons, etc? To me vegetarianism is two-fold - reducing suffering of animals and the pressure on the environment on one side and reducing craving, on another. Meat, in my experience, tends to go with much more craving. So these example don't contribute to suffering or environmental degradation though they may still be results of some craving.

Anyway there are enough of these sort of quibbles around here. So I am happy if there are no takers for this one...
_/|\_

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Ben
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Re: So I gave vegetarianism a try and..

Postby Ben » Fri May 21, 2010 7:01 am

“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

(Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • •

e: [email protected]..

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appicchato
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Re: So I gave vegetarianism a try and..

Postby appicchato » Fri May 21, 2010 7:03 am


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Pannapetar
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Re: So I gave vegetarianism a try and..

Postby Pannapetar » Fri May 21, 2010 7:17 am



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