What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Paul » Thu Apr 26, 2012 8:44 pm

mindyourmind wrote:
Paul wrote:Tony Duff's Flight of the Garuda.

Wow.


Better than Dowman's?


Yes - I think so.

When thinking about translators, I often compare Tony Duff & Erik Pema Kunsang.

Erik has a way of translating things poetically. He really gets to the feeling of what is being expressed. Thing seem to be very beautiful and simple. Tony is almost the opposite. He seems to translate in a very pedantic and exacting way, but although what he writes can seem a little long winded and very technical, it is absolutely 100% clear what the text is trying to convey. I like this kind of super-precision. His notes and glossary are very useful, especially if some simile used in a text is based on some ancient Tibetan folk belief for example.
This nature of mind is spontaneously present.
That spontaneity I was told is the dakini aspect.
Recognizing this should help me
Not to be stuck with fear of being sued.

-Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby mindyourmind » Thu Apr 26, 2012 9:04 pm

Paul wrote:
mindyourmind wrote:
Paul wrote:Tony Duff's Flight of the Garuda.

Wow.


Better than Dowman's?


Yes - I think so.

When thinking about translators, I often compare Tony Duff & Erik Pema Kunsang.

Erik has a way of translating things poetically. He really gets to the feeling of what is being expressed. Thing seem to be very beautiful and simple. Tony is almost the opposite. He seems to translate in a very pedantic and exacting way, but although what he writes can seem a little long winded and very technical, it is absolutely 100% clear what the text is trying to convey. I like this kind of super-precision. His notes and glossary are very useful, especially if some simile used in a text is based on some ancient Tibetan folk belief for example.


That's pretty much my impression of Duff also. I will have to get his FotG.
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Anders » Thu Apr 26, 2012 9:16 pm

I just finished the first chapter of Red Pine's translation of the Lankavatara Sutra.

I mean to finish Sengchao's Prajna is Not-Knowing before proceeding though.

On the side, I sip a bit of poetry from Hanshan Deqing.
"Even if my body should be burnt to death in the fires of hell
I would endure it for myriad lifetimes
As your companion in practice"

--- Gandavyuha Sutra
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Paul » Thu Apr 26, 2012 9:53 pm

mindyourmind wrote:
That's pretty much my impression of Duff also. I will have to get his FotG.


It's also nice to have multiple good translations of a text - that also helps clarify things in my experience.
This nature of mind is spontaneously present.
That spontaneity I was told is the dakini aspect.
Recognizing this should help me
Not to be stuck with fear of being sued.

-Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Lunaria » Fri Apr 27, 2012 6:42 am

gregkavarnos wrote:I wouldn't recommend Batchleors book until after you have a firm grasp of basic Buddhist tenets. Like, maybe, take a walk over to http://accesstoinsight.org/ and get a few Sutta under your belt (especially the teachings to do with kamma and rebirth) and then tackle Batchelors book.
:namaste:


Thank you for the advice. I think I shall leave the book on the pile for the time being. :smile: I am till reviewing and studying what I have read to date. Since I have been reading any thing and every thing I can get my hands on. I plan to tackle some basic tenets hopefully by the end of may. If I may, shall seek your advice on what to read first then.
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Pero » Fri Apr 27, 2012 9:26 am

Paul wrote:Erik has a way of translating things poetically. He really gets to the feeling of what is being expressed. Thing seem to be very beautiful and simple. Tony is almost the opposite. He seems to translate in a very pedantic and exacting way, but although what he writes can seem a little long winded and very technical, it is absolutely 100% clear what the text is trying to convey. I like this kind of super-precision. His notes and glossary are very useful, especially if some simile used in a text is based on some ancient Tibetan folk belief for example.

I have Duff's book too, haven't read all of it yet though. My impression is more or less like that too. More precise translation but it just doesn't have the flow Erik's translation has. So I can't really go "wow" over it. Perhaps if I read Duff's first I could have, but not the other way around. I'm glad I have both though.
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Anders » Fri Apr 27, 2012 9:39 am

Lunaria wrote:
gregkavarnos wrote:I wouldn't recommend Batchleors book until after you have a firm grasp of basic Buddhist tenets. Like, maybe, take a walk over to http://accesstoinsight.org/ and get a few Sutta under your belt (especially the teachings to do with kamma and rebirth) and then tackle Batchelors book.
:namaste:


Thank you for the advice. I think I shall leave the book on the pile for the time being. :smile: I am till reviewing and studying what I have read to date. Since I have been reading any thing and every thing I can get my hands on. I plan to tackle some basic tenets hopefully by the end of may. If I may, shall seek your advice on what to read first then.

I'd second the recommendation not to bother with Buddhism Without Belief.

In many ways, Bhikkhu Bodhi's writings (I noted you had just finished his excellent 'The Noble Eightfold Path) represent the anti-thesis of Bachelor. Bodhi is a thoroughly learned monk who presents Buddhism with great fidelity to what the Buddha taught without making apologies for it, whilst nevertheless remaining sensitive to the concerns of the modern reader.

Bachelor is a modernist who wishes the Buddha taught something different than he did and consequently glosses over large swaths of what the Buddha actually taught, to the point of intellectual dishonesty, in order to present a vision of Buddhism he believes will be more palatable to modern readers than what the Buddha actually taught.
"Even if my body should be burnt to death in the fires of hell
I would endure it for myriad lifetimes
As your companion in practice"

--- Gandavyuha Sutra
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Lunaria » Sat Apr 28, 2012 8:59 am

Anders Honore wrote:In many ways, Bhikkhu Bodhi's writings (I noted you had just finished his excellent 'The Noble Eightfold Path) represent the anti-thesis of Bachelor. Bodhi is a thoroughly learned monk who presents Buddhism with great fidelity to what the Buddha taught without making apologies for it, whilst nevertheless remaining sensitive to the concerns of the modern reader.


I love the Noble eightfold path. Every one new to Buddhism should read it. It breaks down the eightfold path and spells out each point in a clear and easy to understand way.
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby kirtu » Sat Apr 28, 2012 6:56 pm

I have most recently read the namthar of the 6th Dalai Lama, The Hidden Life of the Sixth Dalai Lama, a controversial book written by a Mongolian lama who was a student of a wandering lama who others took to be the 6th Dalai Lama. I wrote about it here.

I'm also rereading Terton Mingyur Dorje's namthar, All Pervading Melodious Sound of Thunder: The Outer Liberation Story of Terton Migyur Dorje.

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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Dave The Seeker » Mon Apr 30, 2012 12:18 pm

"Becoming your own Therapist" the expanded edition with "Make Your Mind an Ocean"
By Lama Yeshe

Kindest wishes, Dave
Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

One whose mind is freed does not argue with anyone, he does not dispute with anyone. He makes use of the conventional terms of the world without clinging to them
~The Buddha~
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Wesley1982 » Sat Jun 02, 2012 5:32 pm

Dhammapada pocketbook
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby duckfiasco » Sat Jun 02, 2012 8:34 pm

I'm trying to find some direction, so I hope to read these books soon:
"A Beginner's Guide to Tibetan Buddhism: Notes from a Practitioner's Journey" - Bruce Newman
"Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind" - Suzuki
"Quintessential Dzogchen: Confusion Dawns as Wisdom" - Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche
"In the Buddha's Words: An Anthology of Discourses from the Pali Canon (Teachings of the Buddha)" - Bhikku Bodhi

I've also heard great things about "Introduction to Tantra : The Transformation of Desire" by Jonathan Landaw, but I'm hesitant to begin any tantric practice without more focus in my practice, and especially without a teacher.

Does anyone have any insights or opinions on the above books?

Thank you!
Peace :heart:
The Perfect Way knows no difficulties
Except that it refuses to make preferences;
Only when freed from hate and love,
It reveals itself fully and without disguise.
- Sengcan (tr. Suzuki)
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Wesley1982 » Sat Jun 02, 2012 9:05 pm

duckfiasco wrote:Does anyone have any insights or opinions on the above books?


At this point - its time for me to be real choosy and selective of which book I order.
1) Read the book several times to make sure you've really understood the summary of the book.
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Paul » Sat Jun 02, 2012 10:13 pm

duckfiasco wrote:"A Beginner's Guide to Tibetan Buddhism: Notes from a Practitioner's Journey" - Bruce Newman


This book's not what you might first think. It's not just an introduction to Tibetan Buddhism, it's a very good guide to how to actually live as a practitioner. The exact angle that the book has is hard to describe - it's kind of like a senior practitioner is taking you under his wing and showing you the things you need to know and the various ups and downs you'll go through. It's a pretty important book, I think. It was written at the request of Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche, by the way. I can see why he aced Bruce to write it - he has a lot of good things to share.

"Quintessential Dzogchen: Confusion Dawns as Wisdom" - Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche


This is an amazing compilation. Really fantastic.
This nature of mind is spontaneously present.
That spontaneity I was told is the dakini aspect.
Recognizing this should help me
Not to be stuck with fear of being sued.

-Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby duckfiasco » Tue Jun 05, 2012 4:42 am

Paul wrote:
duckfiasco wrote:"A Beginner's Guide to Tibetan Buddhism: Notes from a Practitioner's Journey" - Bruce Newman


This book's not what you might first think. It's not just an introduction to Tibetan Buddhism, it's a very good guide to how to actually live as a practitioner. The exact angle that the book has is hard to describe - it's kind of like a senior practitioner is taking you under his wing and showing you the things you need to know and the various ups and downs you'll go through. It's a pretty important book, I think. It was written at the request of Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche, by the way. I can see why he aced Bruce to write it - he has a lot of good things to share.

"Quintessential Dzogchen: Confusion Dawns as Wisdom" - Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche


This is an amazing compilation. Really fantastic.

Thank you very much for your insight! I hope I can bug you a bit more on these two books.

Maybe it's just the "movie star" image some folks like to give, but I'm a bit intimidated by the Dzogchen book. I keep hearing how advanced Dzogchen is and you can't study it without a teacher, it's unsuitable for beginners, etc. etc. I don't know if that's opening a big can of worms, but would you say this book is good for someone with zero knowledge of Dzogchen? :)

Also in a similar vein, do you think the Newman book would be good for someone with a generic Buddhist knowledge and practice looking into Tibetan Buddhism?

I also found the book "Skillful Grace: Tara Practice for Our Times" by Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche in a thread on this forum. I'm contemplating taking Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche's Triple Excellence program, and thought it might be a good way to suss out Tara practice further before committing to such a course.

Thank you everyone again! If I had an eternity to read books, I'd just get all of these! I can't shake the feeling though that my time is very limited, so I'm hoping to find a few books to really dive into instead of wade around in :twothumbsup: Though the thought of having a library of Buddhist books is appealing in its own way :guns:
The Perfect Way knows no difficulties
Except that it refuses to make preferences;
Only when freed from hate and love,
It reveals itself fully and without disguise.
- Sengcan (tr. Suzuki)
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Wesley1982 » Wed Jun 06, 2012 7:01 am

My question still is - do we really understand what we read? . .
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Dave The Seeker » Wed Jun 06, 2012 11:44 am

I'm reading "Mindfulness, in plain English"

I find this book really easy to read and I think it's a good book for the less experienced, or those beginning to meditate.Or at least for me.

Kindest wishes, Dave
Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

One whose mind is freed does not argue with anyone, he does not dispute with anyone. He makes use of the conventional terms of the world without clinging to them
~The Buddha~
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Dave The Seeker » Wed Jun 06, 2012 12:11 pm

Wesley wrote:My question still is - do we really understand what we read?


If one doesn't understand what they read it is most likely that it is "too advanced" for them.
Like asking a first grader to do algebra.
A person has to learn step by step, then understanding is accomplished.

Kindest wishes, Dave
Everyday problems teach us to have a realistic attitude.
They teach us that life is what life is; flawed.
Yet with tremendous potential for joy and fulfillment.
~Lama Surya Das~

If your path teaches you to act and exert yourself correctly and leads to spiritual realizations such as love, compassion and wisdom then obviously it's worthwhile.
~Lama Thubten Yeshe~

One whose mind is freed does not argue with anyone, he does not dispute with anyone. He makes use of the conventional terms of the world without clinging to them
~The Buddha~
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby duckfiasco » Wed Jun 06, 2012 6:55 pm

The Seeker wrote:I'm reading "Mindfulness, in plain English"

I find this book really easy to read and I think it's a good book for the less experienced, or those beginning to meditate.Or at least for me.

Kindest wishes, Dave

This is the book that started it all for me. Wonderfully clear with a sense of humor that I think practice must have to stay grounded and realistic.

Love Bhante G :heart: I recommend another of his books, "Eight Mindful Steps to Happiness." It was the second book I read after "Mindfulness in Plain English" and goes into greater detail about the Noble Eightfold Path :)
The Perfect Way knows no difficulties
Except that it refuses to make preferences;
Only when freed from hate and love,
It reveals itself fully and without disguise.
- Sengcan (tr. Suzuki)
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Re: What Buddhist Books Did You Order, or are Reading?

Postby Paul » Wed Jun 06, 2012 9:28 pm

duckfiasco wrote:Thank you very much for your insight! I hope I can bug you a bit more on these two books.

Maybe it's just the "movie star" image some folks like to give, but I'm a bit intimidated by the Dzogchen book. I keep hearing how advanced Dzogchen is and you can't study it without a teacher, it's unsuitable for beginners, etc. etc. I don't know if that's opening a big can of worms, but would you say this book is good for someone with zero knowledge of Dzogchen? :)


It's simply a great book - read it and enjoy. You do need a teacher to actually practice Dzogchen, but I know people that basically started their Buddhist careers with Dzogchen - mainly Tulku Urgyen students. He would give the Dzogchen pointing out instructions very openly to many, many people.

Also in a similar vein, do you think the Newman book would be good for someone with a generic Buddhist knowledge and practice looking into Tibetan Buddhism?


Yes. It's a very useful book - moreso than you might imagine initially as it's not just another re-explanation of Tibetan Buddhist beliefs. It's much more than that.

I also found the book "Skillful Grace: Tara Practice for Our Times" by Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche in a thread on this forum. I'm contemplating taking Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche's Triple Excellence program, and thought it might be a good way to suss out Tara practice further before committing to such a course.


Another fantastic book. It also has some Dzogchen teachings in it.
This nature of mind is spontaneously present.
That spontaneity I was told is the dakini aspect.
Recognizing this should help me
Not to be stuck with fear of being sued.

-Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche
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