Racism in Buddhism?

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Re: Racism in Buddhism?

Postby Hanzze » Wed Feb 16, 2011 9:10 am

You are right Mr. Gordo, as long as we see the things relative "Racism in Buddhism" is not easy possible, except maybe we would see discriminations relative. What about making non-discrimination to something ultimate on the way?
Just that! :-)
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Re: Racism in Buddhism?

Postby Mr. G » Wed Feb 16, 2011 12:25 pm

Hanzze wrote:You are right Mr. Gordo, as long as we see the things relative "Racism in Buddhism" is not easy possible, except maybe we would see discriminations relative. What about making non-discrimination to something ultimate on the way?


Non discrimination is within Right View
    How foolish you are,
    grasping the letter of the text and ignoring its intention!
    - Vasubandhu
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Re: Racism in Buddhism?

Postby Hanzze » Wed Feb 16, 2011 2:39 pm

different beings
different gender
different nations
different ethics
different provinces
different family
different look
different wealth
different health
different education
different language
different views
different culture
different religion
different customs
different yanas
different traditions
different lineage
different practice
different attachments
different consciousness
different understanding
different expression
different mood
different emotions
different attention

To see so many different, is that the "right" view?
Just that! :-)
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Re: Racism in Buddhism

Postby plwk » Wed Feb 16, 2011 5:00 pm

Racism in Buddhism....
The Buddha dealt with this issue here: Assalayana Sutta and Vasettha Sutta
Is it possible to have a right view discrimination? Could there be a danger in wrong interpretation of "right"?
Firstly...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"And what is Right View?
Knowledge with regard to stress, knowledge with regard to the origination of stress, knowledge with regard to the cessation of stress, knowledge with regard to the way of practice leading to the cessation of stress:
This is called Right View.
Secondly...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"And what is Right View?
Right View, I tell you, is of two sorts:
There is right view with effluents [asava], siding with merit, resulting in the acquisitions [of becoming];
and there is Noble Right View, without effluents, transcendent, a factor of the Path.

"And what is the right view that has effluents, sides with merit, & results in acquisitions?
'There is what is given, what is offered, what is sacrificed. There are fruits & results of good & bad actions. There is this world & the next world. There is mother & father. There are spontaneously reborn beings; there are priests & contemplatives who, faring rightly & practicing rightly, proclaim this world & the next after having directly known & realized it for themselves.'
This is the right view that has effluents, sides with merit, & results in acquisitions.

"And what is the Right View that is without effluents, transcendent, a factor of the Path?
The discernment, the faculty of discernment, the strength of discernment, analysis of qualities as a factor for Awakening, the Path factor of Right View of one developing the Noble Path whose mind is noble, whose mind is free from effluents, who is fully possessed of the Noble Path.
This is the Right View that is without effluents, transcendent, a factor of the Path.
Thirdly...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"Lord, 'Right view, right view,' it is said. To what extent is there right view?"

"By & large, Kaccayana, this world is supported by (takes as its object) a polarity, that of existence & non-existence.
But when one sees the origination of the world as it actually is with right discernment, 'non-existence' with reference to the world does not occur to one.
When one sees the cessation of the world as it actually is with right discernment, 'existence' with reference to the world does not occur to one.

"By & large, Kaccayana, this world is in bondage to attachments, clingings (sustenances), & biases.
But one such as this does not get involved with or cling to these attachments, clingings, fixations of awareness, biases, or obsessions; nor is he resolved on 'my self.'
He has no uncertainty or doubt that just stress, when arising, is arising; stress, when passing away, is passing away.
In this, his knowledge is independent of others. It's to this extent, Kaccayana, that there is Right View.


So your opinion is that there is no danger of racism in Buddhism as well as there actually is no discrimination in Buddhism?

No and I am taking 'Buddhism' here as the Buddha Dharma. Some samples of why...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... el008.html
He set forth the Dhamma, good in the beginning, good in the middle, good in the end, possessed of meaning and the letter, and complete in everything; and he proclaims the holy life that is perfectly pure.
Why? Because...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
'The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One, to be seen here & now, timeless, inviting verification, pertinent, to be realized by the wise for themselves.'
And time proven and tested by....
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
'The Sangha of the Blessed One's disciples who have practiced well... who have practiced straight-forwardly... who have practiced methodically... who have practiced masterfully — in other words, the four types of noble disciples when taken as pairs, the eight when taken as individual types — they are the Sangha of the Blessed One's disciples: worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, the unexcelled field of merit for the world.'
And here...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .ntbb.html
"Sariputta, the Tathagata has these four kinds of intrepidity, possessing which He claims the herd-leader's place, roars His lion's roar in the assemblies, and sets rolling the Wheel of Brahma. What are the four?
"Here, I see no ground on which any recluse or brahman or god or Mara or Brahma or anyone at all in the world could, in accordance with the Dhamma, accuse me thus: 'While you claim full enlightenment, you are not fully enlightened in regard to certain things.' And seeing no ground for that, I abide in safety, fearlessness and intrepidity.
"I see no ground on which any recluse... or anyone at all could accuse me thus: 'While you claim to have destroyed the taints, these taints are undestroyed by you.' And seeing no ground for that, I abide in safety, fearlessness and intrepidity.
"I see no ground on which any recluse... or anyone at all could accuse me thus: 'Those things called obstructions by you are not able to obstruct one who engages in them.' And seeing no ground for that, I abide in safety, fearlessness and intrepidity.
"I see no ground on which any recluse... or anyone at all could accuse me thus: 'When you teach the Dhamma to someone, it does not lead him when he practices it to the complete destruction of suffering.' And seeing no ground for that, I abide in safety, fearlessness and intrepidity.
"A Tathagata has these four kinds of intrepidity, possessing which he claims the herd-leader's place, roars his lion's roar in the assemblies, and sets rolling the Wheel of Brahma."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/dhp/
'Of all the paths the Eightfold Path is the best;
Of all the truths the Four Noble Truths are the best;
Of all things Passionlessness is the best:
Of men the Seeing One (the Buddha) is the best.'
This is the only Path; there is none other for the purification of insight. Tread this Path, and you will bewilder Mara.
Walking upon this Path, you will make an end of suffering. Having discovered how to pull out the thorn of lust, I make known the Path.
The gift of Dhamma excels all gifts; the taste of the Dhamma excels all tastes; the delight in Dhamma excels all delights.
The Craving-Freed vanquishes all suffering.

Now, nearly all "Buddhist" would tell that they are Non-Racists or non of that "searching for Different"-kind. How much is that reality and how to solve it?
What its followers do is another issue...here's some ideas of what's expected of 'Buddhists'
See Candala Sutta and Jivaka Sutta
http://www.yellowrobe.com/component/con ... chers.html
‘Here, Lohicca, a Tathāgata arises in the world, an Arahant, fully-enlightened Buddha, endowed with wisdom and conduct, Well-Farer, Knower of the worlds, incomparable Trainer of men to be tamed, Teacher of gods and humans, enlightened and blessed.
He, having realized it by His own super-knowledge, proclaims this world with its devas, its māras and Brahmās, its princes and people.
He preaches the Dhamma that is lovely in the beginning, lovely in its middle, lovely in its ending, in the spirit and in the letter, and displays the fully-perfected and purified holy life.
A disciple goes forth and practices the moralities, guards the sense-doors, attains the first jhāna....He attains the other three jhānas...‘He realizes the Four Noble Truths, the path, and the cessation of the corruptions...
And whenever the pupil of a teacher attains to such excellent distinction, that is a teacher who is not blamed in the world.
And if anyone blames that teacher, his blame is improper, untrue, not in accordance with reality, and faulty.'
And some serious reflections...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"It's not the earth property that makes the true Dhamma disappear. It's not the water property... the fire property... the wind property that makes the true Dhamma disappear. It's worthless people who arise right here [within the Sangha] who make the true Dhamma disappear.
The true Dhamma doesn't disappear the way a boat sinks all at once.

"These five downward-leading qualities tend to the confusion and disappearance of the true Dhamma. Which five?
There is the case where the monks, nuns, male lay followers, & female lay followers live without respect, without deference, for the Teacher.
They live without respect, without deference, for the Dhamma... for the Sangha... for the Training... for concentration.
These are the five downward-leading qualities that tend to the confusion and disappearance of the true Dhamma.
See: The Buddha Speaks the Ultimate Extinction of the Dharma Sutra
http://www.ymba.org/bns/bnsframe.htm
40. Discrimination in Conferring the Precepts
A disciple of the Buddha should not be selective and show preference in conferring the Bodhisattva precepts.
Each and every person can receive the precepts -- kings, princes, high officials, Bhiksus, Bhiksunis, laymen, laywomen, libertines, prostitutes, the gods in the eighteen Brahma Heavens or the six Desire Heavens, asexual persons, bisexual persons, eunuchs, slaves, or demons and ghosts of all types.
Except for those who have committed the Cardinal Sins, everyone can receive the Bodhisattva precepts.

47. On Regulations Against the Dharma
A disciple of the Buddha who has accepted the precepts of the Buddhas with a faithful mind, must not use his high official position (as a king, prince, official, etc.) to undermine the moral code of the Buddhas. He may not establish rules and regulations preventing the four kinds of lay disciples from joining the Order and practicing the Way, nor may he prohibit the making of Buddha or Bodhisattva images, statues and stupas, or the printing and distribution of sutras and codes. Likewise, he must not establish rules and regulations placing controls on the Fourfold Assembly. If highly placed lay disciples engage in actions contrary to the Dharma, they are no different from vassals in the service of [illegitimate] rulers.
A Bodhisattva should rightfully receive respect and offerings from all.
If instead, he is forced to defer to officials, this is contrary to the Dharma, contrary to the moral code.
Hence, if a king or official has received the Bodhisattva precepts with a wholesome mind, he should avoid offenses that harm the Three Jewels.
If instead, he intentionally commits such acts, he is guilty of a secondary offense.

48. On Destroying the Dharma
A disciple of the Buddha who becomes a monk with wholesome intentions must not, for fame or profit, explain the precepts to kings or officials in such a way as to cause monks, nuns or laymen who have received the Bodhisattva precepts to be tied up, thrown into prison or forcefully conscripted. If a Bodhisattva acts in such a manner, he is no different from a worm in a lion's body, eating away at the lion's flesh. This is not something a worm living outside the lion can do. Likewise, only disciples of the Buddhas can bring down the Dharma -- no externalist or demon can do so.
In the end analysis...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .budd.html
You yourselves must strive; the Buddhas only point the way.

different beings
different gender
different nations
different ethics
different provinces
different family
different look
different wealth
different health
different education
different language
different views
different culture
different religion
different customs
different yanas
different traditions
different lineage
different practice
different attachments
different consciousness
different understanding
different expression
different mood
different emotions
different attention
To see so many different, is that the "right" view?
Here's a reflection...
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"When this is, that is.
From the arising of this comes the arising of that.
When this isn't, that isn't.
From the cessation of this comes the cessation of that."

"In other words: From ignorance as a requisite condition come fabrications. From fabrications as a requisite condition comes consciousness. From consciousness as a requisite condition comes name-&-form. From name-&-form as a requisite condition come the six sense media. From the six sense media as a requisite condition comes contact. From contact as a requisite condition comes feeling. From feeling as a requisite condition comes craving. From craving as a requisite condition comes clinging/sustenance. From clinging/sustenance as a requisite condition comes becoming. From becoming as a requisite condition comes birth. From birth as a requisite condition, then aging & death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair come into play.
Such is the origination of this entire mass of stress & suffering.

"Now from the remainderless fading & cessation of that very ignorance comes the cessation of fabrications. From the cessation of fabrications comes the cessation of consciousness. From the cessation of consciousness comes the cessation of name-&-form. From the cessation of name-&-form comes the cessation of the six sense media. From the cessation of the six sense media comes the cessation of contact. From the cessation of contact comes the cessation of feeling. From the cessation of feeling comes the cessation of craving. From the cessation of craving comes the cessation of clinging/sustenance. From the cessation of clinging/sustenance comes the cessation of becoming. From the cessation of becoming comes the cessation of birth.
From the cessation of birth, then aging & death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair all cease.
Such is the cessation of this entire mass of stress & suffering.
"This is the noble method that he has rightly seen & rightly ferreted out through discernment.
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Re: Racism in Buddhism?

Postby Hanzze » Thu Feb 17, 2011 4:06 am

Thanks for your effort and reflections plwk!

Seems like it is very important to abstain from thinking to have attained the right view. This kind of mind setting (I have not attained it jet), would lead to humility, no confusion, respect for the teacher and accessibility of the Dharma. The very side effect would be that racism or discrimination could not easy exist.

So somebody with the view would be able to teach the Dharma in its way. As somebody with a corrupted view would always have the tendency to discrimination.
What signs a teacher of non discrimination, on which signs should we look?
Just that! :-)
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Re: Racism in Buddhism?

Postby catmoon » Tue Feb 22, 2011 1:27 pm

My current teacher exhibits the following signs:

She likes Christians and Muslims just as much as Buddhists
She refuses to engage in sectarian arguments
She does not criticize
Sergeant Schultz knew everything there was to know.
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