Advice for the young layperson

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Advice for the young layperson

Postby flowerbudh » Sun Nov 10, 2013 5:48 am

Perhaps one day I will become a nun, but for now I am living in the secular world filled with the plagues of passion and ignorance. I have set my heart completely on liberating myself and all others from suffering... can any of you link me articles on how others have done this or provide your own insight... so, essentially, being a layperson (esp. young) and how to handle it. Thanks guys! <3
Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without. - The Buddha
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby Adamantine » Sun Nov 10, 2013 6:13 am

flowerbudh wrote:Perhaps one day I will become a nun, but for now I am living in the secular world filled with the plagues of passion and ignorance. I have set my heart completely on liberating myself and all others from suffering... can any of you link me articles on how others have done this or provide your own insight... so, essentially, being a layperson (esp. young) and how to handle it. Thanks guys! <3


I actually haven't read this one but I plan to. It seems like it has what you are looking for in a book. http://www.amazon.com/Shambhala-The-Sacred-Path-Warrior/dp/1590304519Check it out!
Contentment is the ultimate wealth;
Detachment is the final happiness. ~Sri Saraha
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby tigerh98 » Sun Nov 10, 2013 6:57 am

Try to get a book of a buddhist nun or try googleing for woman who have become a nun :smile:
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Nov 10, 2013 7:22 am

Hi flowerbudh,

You might find the talks by Ajahn Vayama, a Theravada Nun in Western Australia, interesting. She was Abbot of the Nuns' Monastery there until 2011. I've always found her talks inspiring.
http://www.dhammaloka.org.au/downloads/ ... ayama.html

Some of the talks are about historical nuns, which you might find some encouragement from. For example:
    Taming The Untamed: The Enlightened Nun Dantika
    Bhikkhuni Abhirupa Nanda
    Advice To The Bhikkhunis
    The Story Of Kisa-Gotami
It's been a while since I listened to her talks, since she stopped doing talks over two years ago, but I always thought that they were excellent.

:anjali:
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby Alfredo » Sun Nov 10, 2013 9:32 am

Wanting to get enlightened is a bit like wanting to levitate. There are all kinds of stories, and some people will promise you that they know the right way, but I would warn against believing in religion too much. Live a normal life, and be kind to others. Follow your heart, in combination with your head. Fit your Buddhist practices around that, don't turn it into a cult thing.
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby Tsongkhapafan » Sun Nov 17, 2013 11:36 pm

The practical way to liberate oneself from the mental poisons of attachment, hatred and ignorance is to practice Training the mind teachings. There is one great Tibetan Teacher of this practice called Geshe Chekhawa who said "train in the three difficulties". This means that we should make effort to accomplish three difficult things - to recognise the delusions within one's own experience, to oppose them with the methods that are explained in Buddha's teachings (overcoming attachment with renunciation, hatred with love and patience, and ignorance with wisdom realising emptiness), and then finally to remove the seeds of delusions from our mind by realising ultimate truth, emptiness. If you can obtain a practical explanation of how to do this, a commentary to Geshe Chekhawa's Training the Mind in Seven Points it would certainly help you to practise as a layperson who wants to destroy her delusions.
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby shaunc » Mon Nov 18, 2013 4:13 am

Follow the 5 precepts & practise your meditation.
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby Lindama » Mon Nov 18, 2013 4:29 am

Dear Flowerbud,

You seem very young so I would encourage you to take life step by step and see what happens. You clearly have a caring and compassionate heart, just stay open to where life may take you. You need not make any decisions yet, just follow your heart.

If you have an interest in Tibetan practice, please look up Tsultrim Allione and her work:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsultrim_Allione

http://taramandala.org/

I have spent some time at Tara Mandala. You might want to explore that when the time is ready. I trust that you'll know when that is.

all the best
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby lobster » Mon Nov 18, 2013 7:40 am

I have set my heart completely on liberating myself and all others from suffering...


Seems like a plan.
What advice would you offer yourself? :popcorn:
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby jzpowell93 » Mon Nov 18, 2013 8:37 am

I am also a young layperson :) I might also want to become a nun one day, but not right now, I don't think...

Still, I've been worried about how exactly I will fit Buddhist practice into my daily life. I've already gone away from it once because it was too much, and then I skipped meditation today... I would appreciate any advice too ^^;

OP, maybe we could talk and figure out ways to help each other, if you don't mind :) it would at least be nice to have someone to talk to!
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby Paul » Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:13 am

Dzogchen is perfect for the layperson as practicing it is not dependent on circumstances such as living as a renunciate or having lots of free time to learn and practice rituals etc.
Look at the unfathomable spinelessness of man: all the means he's been given to stay alert he uses, in the end, to ornament his sleep. – Rene Daumal
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby ClearblueSky » Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:42 am

The "world filled with the plagues of passion and ignorance"? Sounds like you could be talking about a monastery too. You'd be surprised, they're not an instant ticket to enlightened living where everyone's perfect ;)
The next step you may want to take is try looking at some various Dharma centers in your area (of course some places have more than others, but hopefully there's at least some). Sometimes meeting some teachers and fellow practitioners can give us a big boost in addition to studying books, and maybe it'll be the next best thing to joining a nunnery. Maybe it'll be better even, who knows.

As for specifics you might like the book Dharma punx. It's all about working towards enlightenment as a young person, in a crazy samsaric culture. It's a bit more of an autobiography than a specific teaching per se, but I found it inspiring and entertaining. Also, the Podcast "Against The Stream" would probably be of interest, a lot of good teachers on there. Free on itunes (there's actually a bunch of good Buddhist podcasts out there).
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby Astus » Mon Nov 18, 2013 5:22 pm

There's nothing special about being young or a layperson. Buddhism offers the same to everyone. The difference lies in the level of commitment. You can simply call yourself a Buddhist without any content. You can take one, two, three or dozens of precepts and follow them to the best of your abilities. You can read nice books and ponder about the meaning of life. You can do some sort of meditation regularly or not so regularly. And many many more. It is really up to you. You can follow a single teaching, a single practice, or you can follow a complex teaching with a variety of methods. Being young and a layperson has meaning only to you, as you define your level of interest in the Dharma.

The Mahayana has the six paramitas as the basic description of the path of the bodhisattva. You can read about them from Nagarjuna in this book: Nagarjuna on the Six Perfections. Shantideva's inspiring poem is also a very good introduction to Mahayana: [url=books.google.com/books?id=IEqvQBKyA6MC]The Way of the Bodhisattva[/url]. And the Vimalakirti Sutra is a great example of how lay life and Buddhism can come together, not to mention it is a quite funny scripture: PDF.
"There is no such thing as the real mind. Ridding yourself of delusion: that's the real mind."
(Sheng-yen: Getting the Buddha Mind, p 73)

"Neither cultivation nor seated meditation — this is the pure Chan of Tathagata."
(Mazu Daoyi, X1321p3b23; tr. Jinhua Jia)

“Don’t rashly seek the true Buddha;
True Buddha can’t be found.
Does marvelous nature and spirit
Need tempering or refinement?
Mind is this mind carefree;
This face, the face at birth."

(Nanyue Mingzan: Enjoying the Way, tr. Jeff Shore; T2076p461b24-26)
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby Karma Jinpa » Wed Dec 04, 2013 1:19 pm

If you get involved with a local Dharma center in your area, it is my experience that you should be prepared to be accepted and indeed welcomed as the youngest person in the local Sangha. Perhaps it's this way more in the Southeastern U.S., but the groups I've become part of have all tended to be made up of folks middle-aged on up.

That said, there are plenty of resources out there for young Buddhists. One of my personal favorites is the Karmapa Youth Community. They are dedicated solely to "inspiring youth through the activities and aspirations of Karmapa!" http://karmapayouth.wordpress.com/ & http://www.facebook.com/?_rdr#!/groups/363079734190?view=group&refid=18
"The Sutras, Tantras, and Philosophical Scriptures are great in number. However life is short, and intelligence is limited, so it's hard to cover them completely. You may know a lot, but if you don't put it into practice, it's like dying of thirst on the shore of a great lake. Likewise, it happens that a common corpse is found in the bed of a great scholar." ~ Karma Chagme

དྲིན་ཆེན་རྗེ་བཙུན་བླ་མ་རཱ་ག་ཨ་སྱ་མཁྱེན་ནོ།
ཀརྨ་པ་མཁྱེན་ནོ།


:namaste:
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby KonchokZoepa » Wed Dec 04, 2013 1:50 pm

yah, usually dharma center people are quite old if your in your early twenties or younger.
If the thought of demons
Never rises in your mind,
You need not fear the demon hosts around you.
It is most important to tame your mind within....

In so far as the Ultimate, or the true nature of being is concerned,
there are neither buddhas or demons.
He who frees himself from fear and hope, evil and virtue,
will realize the insubstantial and groundless nature of confusion.
Samsara will then appear as the mahamudra itself….

-Milarepa

OMMANIPADMEHUNG

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ls6P9tOYmdo
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Re: Advice for the young layperson

Postby Malcolm » Wed Dec 04, 2013 4:36 pm

flowerbudh wrote:I have set my heart completely on liberating myself and all others from suffering... can any of you link me articles on how others have done this or provide your own insight... so, essentially, being a layperson (esp. young) and how to handle it. Thanks guys! <3


No one has ever managed to do this [i.e. liberate all others from suffering], not even the Buddha. But you can try.
http://www.atikosha.org
http://www.bhaisajya.net
http://www.bhaisajya.guru
http://www.sakyapa.net
འ༔ ཨ༔ ཧ༔ ཤ༔ ས༔ མ༔

How can you not practice the highest Dharma
at this time of obtaining a perfect human body?

-- Jetsun Dragpa Gyaltsen
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