Questions about Buddhism?

Whether you're exploring Buddhism for the first time or you're already on the path, feel free to ask questions of any kind here.

Re: Questions about Buddhism?

Postby rachmiel » Sun Jun 02, 2013 11:01 pm

Each to his/her own, I guess. :-)

I have no problem with an eclectic approach to spirituality. Nor do I have an aversion to lack of sophistication. Quite the opposite! I'm very suspicious of creating/following a strictly laid-out spiritual path, it's way too close to dogma for me. Slippery slope ...

That said, sure, Tolle's commercialism rubs me the wrong way. Imo the dharma should be free for all humankind. But I've never had a head for business. ;-)
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Re: Questions about Buddhism?

Postby Nilasarasvati » Sun Jun 02, 2013 11:02 pm

Johnny Dangerous wrote:
Seems like when you are part of a tradition, whatever your flaws, you acknowledge that whatever bit of realization you might have eeked out comes alrelgy from that tradtion. Talking like these traditions just sort of parallel insights you've discovered on your own seems like it adds a whole different tone to things.


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Re: Questions about Buddhism?

Postby Johnny Dangerous » Sun Jun 02, 2013 11:14 pm

rachmiel wrote:Each to his/her own, I guess. :-)

I have no problem with an eclectic approach to spirituality. Nor do I have an aversion to lack of sophistication. Quite the opposite! I'm very suspicious of creating/following a strictly laid-out spiritual path, it's way too close to dogma for me. Slippery slope ...

That said, sure, Tolle's commercialism rubs me the wrong way. Imo the dharma should be free for all humankind. But I've never had a head for business. ;-)



I don't have an issue with an eclectic approach either, I just have an issue with not giving credit where it's due....maybe i'm mistaken with Tolle, but from what I have read and seen this is a possibility.
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Re: Questions about Buddhism?

Postby rachmiel » Sun Jun 02, 2013 11:56 pm

Johnny Dangerous wrote:I don't have an issue with an eclectic approach either, I just have an issue with not giving credit where it's due....maybe i'm mistaken with Tolle, but from what I have read and seen this is a possibility.

Maybe Tolle picked this "tabula rasa"-ish approach from one of his role models, Krishnamurti, who hardly ever mentioned any spiritual writings and teachers?
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Re: Questions about Buddhism?

Postby Johnny Dangerous » Mon Jun 03, 2013 1:30 am

rachmiel wrote:
Johnny Dangerous wrote:I don't have an issue with an eclectic approach either, I just have an issue with not giving credit where it's due....maybe i'm mistaken with Tolle, but from what I have read and seen this is a possibility.

Maybe Tolle picked this "tabula rasa"-ish approach from one of his role models, Krishnamurti, who hardly ever mentioned any spiritual writings and teachers?



There are lots of reasons I can imagine it being in Tolles case, from skillful means due to westerners knee-jerk aversion to anything "mystical" or religious, self-aggrandizement, acceptance into Oprah's book club (hah), who knows.

It might be motivated by something good, something bad, combination of both..I just find it weird when there are traditions that parallel like 90% of what he says, but there is really no credit given, the message just seems like "all these guys were saying the same as me"..maybe I read him wrong, but that's how it seems. If all these guys were saying the same thing as him, what does he bring to the table, and why did he not just seek out teachings with these people on a long term basis, and then do this broader presentation?

On the other hand there are people who teach this sort of broadness with multiple traditions, but do a little better job of acknowledging the traditions themselves, and their qualities. Maybe i'm being too hard on him, but that seems conspicuously absent to me.

Anyway i'm done going OT about him here, he's been talked to exhaustion on here, I just brought it up because the OP seems to think he is a Buddhist teacher, but I don't think he is a Buddhist teacher, even if there is some merit in his teachings, which I concede there probably is..even if I personally feel pretty uncomfortable with the packaging and presentation.
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Re: Questions about Buddhism?

Postby Konchog1 » Mon Jun 03, 2013 1:55 am

I wonder if there is value to his teachings. His "remaining in the present moment" seems the same as Tilopa's Six Words of Advice. (to me, I could be wrong)
Equanimity is the ground. Love is the moisture. Compassion is the seed. Bodhicitta is the result.

-Paraphrase of Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Tsephel citing the Guhyasamaja Tantra

"All memories and thoughts are the union of emptiness and knowing, the Mind.
Without attachment, self-liberating, like a snake in a knot.
Through the qualities of meditating in that way,
Mental obscurations are purified and the dharmakaya is attained."

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Re: Questions about Buddhism?

Postby muni » Tue Jun 04, 2013 8:39 am

PadmaVonSamba wrote:When Buddhism says life is suffering,
it refers to a state of constant dissatisfaction, restlessness, the opposite of perfect peace of mind.
You noticed this yourself when meditating.
That's the point of meditation, to gradually calm the mind.
Naturally, this is hard at first.
Why is that?

When Buddhism talks about non-attachment
it doesn't mean you can't love, or enjoy life's wonders.
It simply means that becoming attached to things which do not last
cannot bring lasting peace of mind.
I love my big German Shepherd dog
and I will be miserable on his last day with me.

Buddhism teaches how to be happy without depending on happiness
and how to be sad without dwelling in sadness.

When Buddhism talks about desire
it doesn't say to stop wanting things.
Go out and enjoy life. Play with your dog.
But consider, do you love your dog because of who your dog is
or are you attached to some fixed idea of your dog,
that only comes from your own imagination?

When Buddhism says suffering is a product of the mind
it means that outside of the mind,
where does one's suffering exist?
You cannot change all of the conditions of the painful world which you describe
but you can change your experience from one of anger or confusion, or victimization
to one of compassion and clarity
and actually benefit not only yourself, but countless beings.

Believe it or not,
Suffering begins and ends in the mind.
You cannot control what others do to you
but you can control your own mind.
This does not mean that you can be happy being raped or having a nail in your skull.
But who is the one holding onto it now?
All beings suffer.
But you don't have to carry that pain with you your whole life.
Strangely enough,
one's own suffering is reduced
the moment one wishes for others to be free from suffering.

When Buddhism talks about living in the moment
it means not to dwell on the past or get lost pondering what may or may not happen.
Everything on the whole planet, is only happening right now, at this very second,
Constantly.
Nothing is happening in the past or in the future.
except in your own thoughts.
So, focusing on right now is of great benefit.
Which is a greater waste of time...
freeing the mind in the present moment
or constantly weighing it down with baggage from the past?

Don't expect anything from meditating.
Instead, expect nothing, if you sit long enough.
HOW NICE! You deserve a little vacation.
Every second of our lives we are chasing after things,
or trying to escape from things,
and always expecting things.
Even when we sleep, when we dream, the mind is busy.
That is what Buddhism means by "suffering".
Meditation gradually lets your mind relax.
Like pond water that has been stirred up, full of mud, you can't drink it. You can't wash with it.
But if you wait and let the mud settle, the water returns to its original clear state.
then it becomes usable again.
That's the mind in meditation.

If Mooji and Eckhart Tolle make you think of suicide,
stop listening to them. They are not Buddhist teachers.
Buddhism is not about suicide.
Properly understood, suicide is not the logical conclusion.
Suicide shuts everything down.
Buddhism opens everything up
....sometimes more than you want!

Two months is a good start.
Twenty-five years, maybe better.
Consider all of these doubts a good sign
that you are being truly honest with yourself
and keep meditating.
.
.
.

"Strangely enough,
one's own suffering is reduced
the moment one wishes for others to be free from suffering."

:good:
Precious jewel! Wishing from the heart. :heart:
Samsaras' habitual misperception does opposite like judging, then in no way suffering can be reduced.
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