Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Jnana
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Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby Jnana » Mon May 23, 2011 4:20 am


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Astus
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Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby Astus » Mon May 23, 2011 8:36 am

I'd add a few others, mostly studies.

Cultivating original enlightenment: Wonhyo's Exposition of the Vajrasamādhi-sūtra by Robert E. Buswell Jr.

Seeing through Zen: encounter, transformation, and genealogy in Chinese Chan Buddhism by John R. McRae
The Northern School and the formation of early Chʻan Buddhism by John R. McRae
The mystique of transmission: on an early Chan history and its contexts by Wendi Leigh Adamek
Inventing Hui-neng, the sixth Patriarch: Hagiography and biography in early Ch'an by John J. Jørgensen
The Hongzhou School of Chan Buddhism in Eighth- Through Tenth-Century China by Jinhua Jia (a good complementary to Poceski's work)
The Linji lu and the creation of Chan orthodoxy: the development of Chan's records of sayings literature by Albert Welter
How Zen Became Zen: The Dispute Over Enlightenment and the Formation of Chan Buddhism in Song-Dynasty China by Morten Schlutter
The Power of Patriarchs: Qisong and Lineage in Chinese Buddhism by Elizabeth Morrison
Monks, rulers, and literati: the political ascendancy of Chan Buddhism by Albert Welter
Enlightenment in dispute: the reinvention of Chan Buddhism in seventeenth-century China by Jiang Wu
Eminent nuns: women Chan masters of seventeenth-century China by Beata Grant
The origins of Buddhist monastic codes in China: an annotated translation and study of the Chanyuan qinggui by Yifa, Zongze
Sōtō Zen in medieval Japan by William M. Bodiford
Five Mountains: the Rinzai Zen monastic institution in medieval Japan by Martin Collcutt
Japanese Rinzai Zen Buddhism: Myōshinji, a living religion by Jørn Borup

Works by Bernard Faure:
The will to orthodoxy: a critical genealogy of Northern Chan Buddhism
Chan Insights and Oversights: An Epistemological Critique of the Chan Tradition
The rhetoric of immediacy: a cultural critique of Chan/Zen Buddhism
Visions of Power: Imagining Medieval Japanese Buddhism
Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.



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Astus
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Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby Astus » Mon May 23, 2011 2:52 pm

A few more:

Integrating Chinese Buddhism: A Study of Yongming Yanshou’s Guanxin Xuanshu by Yi-hsung Huang
Inquiry into the origin of humanity: an annotated translation of Tsung-mi's Yüan jen lun with a modern commentary by Peter N. Gregory
Tsung-mi and the sinification of Buddhism by Peter N. Gregory
Coming to terms with Chinese Buddhism: a reading of the Treasure store treatise by Robert H. Sharf
Sudden and Gradual: Approaches to Enlightenment in Chinese Thought by Peter N. Gregory
Buddhism in the Sung by Peter N. Gregory, Daniel Aaron Getz

Steven Heine, Dale Stuart Wright:

Zen ritual: studies of Zen Buddhist theory in practice
Zen classics: formative texts in the history of Zen Buddhism
The Zen canon: understanding the classic texts
The Kōan: texts and contexts in Zen Buddhism
Zen Masters

Philosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism by Dale S. Wright

Steven Heine:

Opening a mountain: kōans of the Zen Masters
Shifting shape, shaping text: philosophy and folklore in the Fox kōan
Zen skin, Zen marrow: will the real Zen Buddhism please stand up?
Did Dōgen go to China?: what he wrote and when he wrote it
Dōgen and the Kōan tradition: a tale of two Shōbōgenzō texts
Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.



norman
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Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby norman » Mon May 23, 2011 8:53 pm

Great topic!

Has anyone read The Record of Linji?

http://www.amazon.com/Record-Nanzan-Lib ... 0824828216


norman
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Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby norman » Mon May 23, 2011 8:58 pm

Astus,

Anything in particular you would recommend from that list?

Thank you.

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Astus
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Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby Astus » Mon May 23, 2011 10:18 pm

Seeing through Zen by McRae I think is the best for starters in the topic, and it is in quite an enjoyable style. Zongmi on Chan, The Sutra of Perfect Enlightenment, Cultivating Original Enlightenment and Tracing Back the Radiance are wonderful and comprehensive works on Zen doctrine and practice I can recommend for everyone who is serious about understanding this kind of Buddhism.
Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.



Greg
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Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 6:42 pm

Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby Greg » Thu Aug 18, 2011 10:19 pm

Tracing Back the Radiance is a great book. Unfortunately, however, it is a highly abridged version of the far more comprehensive The Korean Approach to Zen - The Collected Works of Chinul. Sadly, this has been out of print for quite a while. Fortunately, it is on scribd. ()

mtran
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Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby mtran » Sun Mar 18, 2012 7:51 am

What part of recent don't anyone understand? Oh, if you're talking about within the past 100 years, these books quite recent, compared to those written in the early 1900s.

upasaka_/\_
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Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby upasaka_/\_ » Tue May 08, 2012 2:37 am

all of the books listed above are fantastic ideas! thanks to the poster! if you are like me and cannot afford them though, here are some free resources on chan:






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greentreee
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Location: in the woods in northern ontario

Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby greentreee » Sat May 26, 2012 6:27 pm

hi just thought i'd add one to the list. i haven't completed reading it but i thought i add it anyways, considering the subject.

Grass Mountain: A Seven Day Intensive in Ch’an Training With Master Nan Huai-Chin by Margaret Yuan, Janis Walker 0877286124
scratching thick hair'd head,
"if air can be conditioned,
like where's the shampoo?"

"greentreee"

el gatito
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Joined: Tue Jun 08, 2010 4:23 pm

Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby el gatito » Wed Dec 25, 2013 5:28 am

The Essence of Chan By Guo Gu

The Essence of Chan is a commentary on the legendary founder Bodhidharma's text, "Two Entries and Four Practices." This short scripture contains the marrow, or essence, of all his teachings. Chan teacher Guo Gu offers a translation of this significant text, as well as an elaboration on how the teachings can be applied to life. The book is a nonsectarian guide of immense practical help for all Dharma practitioners. To purchase a copy of this ebook please visit: { http://www.shambhala.com/the-essence-of-chan.html }.

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seeker242
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Location: South Florida, USA

Re: Chan Texts: Translations & Studies

Postby seeker242 » Wed Sep 03, 2014 12:11 pm

Curious, is The Bodhidharma Anthology considered to be a definitive account of Bodhidharma and his teachings? I read that previously Bodhidharma actual teaching and life, etc. were somewhat suspect of being genuine Bodhidharma. Does the finding of this text settle the matter once and for all?
One should not kill any living being, nor cause it to be killed, nor should one incite any other to kill. Do never injure any being, whether strong or weak, in this entire universe!


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