What does it mean to practice seriously?

No holds barred discussion on the Buddhadharma. Argue about rebirth, karma, commentarial interpretations etc. Be nice to each other.

Re: What does it mean to practice seriously?

Postby Jikan » Sun Apr 28, 2013 12:43 pm

Sara H wrote:Practicing seriously Jikan, means practicing Right Effort.

That is essentially what this thread is about.

There are a great many resources available on the subject of Right Effort.

Althouth admitedly, it is a difficult concept to get right at first, as for most people, Right Effort is something that has to be done to understand it, and for many people it is common to oscillate back and forth between extremes (which hopefully become less and less extreme, and more and more closer to the middle) in order to discover a middle path.

Pushing your body to physical extremes and to the point of possibly breaking is not a middle path.

It's like with our thumb position in meditation:

We don't mash them together until the thumbnails turn white, straining ourselves.

And we also don't let them hang limply.

We just hold them together, lightly touching.

Not too much effort, and not "not enough" either.

Just a middle path between lassitude, and straining ourselves.

We don't need to "ram down the gates of heaven" so to speak with a battering ram.

It is enough to politely knock.

In Gasshō,

Sara H.


This is an interesting reflection. Thank you for it.
Jikan
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4287
Joined: Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:04 pm

Re: What does it mean to practice seriously?

Postby Astus » Sun Apr 28, 2013 12:52 pm

Once Zen Master To An was visiting another temple. He was not wearing his Zen Master clothes, but just the clothes of a wandering monk. He began a conversation with one of the monks at the temple, who did not recognize him. Soon the monk began to talk about his Master. “Everyday he does one thousand prostrations. He eats only one meal a day. He hasn’t left the temple for thirty years. He is always sitting Zen. He is the greatest Zen Master in all of China.”
To An replied, “Well, well, he sounds like an extraordinary man. I can’t do any of these things. I can’t bow a thousand times a day; but my mind is never lazy. I can’t eat only once a day; but I never desire food. I can’t stay in a temple for more than a short time; but wherever I go I have no hindrance. I can’t sit Zen for very long; but I never give rise to thinking.”
The monk said, “I don’t understand.” “Then go ask your Master,” To An replied. The monk bowed and went into the temple.
Soon the Zen Master of the temple came running out to To An and prostrated himself three times in front of him. “You are a great Zen Master,” he said. “Please let me become your disciple. I have been very attached to hard training. But now that I have heard your words, my mind is clear.”
To An laughed and said, “No, I can’t be your teacher. You are already a great Zen Master. All you need to do is to keep the mind you had when you were bowing to me. Already you are a free man. Before, you were bowing, sitting and eating only for yourself. Now it is for all people.”
At these words, the Zen Master began to weep with joy. He bowed again to To An and said, simply, “Thank you.”


(Dropping Ashes on the Buddha, p. 112-113)
"There is no such thing as the real mind. Ridding yourself of delusion: that's the real mind."
(Sheng-yen: Getting the Buddha Mind, p 73)

“Don’t rashly seek the true Buddha;
True Buddha can’t be found.
Does marvelous nature and spirit
Need tempering or refinement?
Mind is this mind carefree;
This face, the face at birth."

(Nanyue Mingzan: Enjoying the Way, tr. Jeff Shore; T51n2076, p461b24-26)
User avatar
Astus
Former staff member
 
Posts: 4126
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:22 pm
Location: Budapest

Re: What does it mean to practice seriously?

Postby plwk » Sun Apr 28, 2013 2:23 pm

"Monks, there are these four ways of taking on practices. Which four?
There is the taking on of a practice that is pleasant in the present but yields pain in the future.
There is the taking on of a practice that is painful in the present and yields pain in the future.
There is the taking on of a practice that is painful in the present but yields pleasure in the future.
There is the taking on of a practice that is pleasant in the present and yields pleasure in the future.

More here and here

Bhikkhus, these four are the endeavours. What four?
The endeavour to restrain, the endeavour to dispel, the endeavour to develop and the endeavour to protect.

Bhikkhus, what is the endeavour to restrain?
Here, bhikkhus, the bhikkhu arouses interest, makes effort and pursues the mind for the not arising of non arisen demeritorious thoughts.
Bhikkhus, to this is called the endeavour to restrain

Bhikkhus, what is the endeavour to dispel?
Here, bhikkhus, the bhikkhu arouses interest, makes effort and pursues the mind for the dispelling of arisen demeritorious thoughts.
Bhikkhus, to this is called the endeavour to dispel.

Bhikkhus, what is the endeavour to develop?
Here, bhikkhus, the bhikkhu arouses interest, makes effort and pursues the mind for the arising of non arisen meritorious thoughts.
Bhikkhus, to this is called the endeavour to develop.

Bhikkhus, what is the endeavour to protect?
Here, bhikkhus, the bhikkhu arouses interest, makes effort and pursues the mind for the establishment, unconfused development and completion of the arisen meritorious thoughts. Bhikkhus, to this is called the endeavour to protect.

Here & here
plwk
 
Posts: 2457
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2010 10:41 am

Previous

Return to Open Dharma

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: hop.pala, JKhedrup, mikenz66 and 12 guests

>