Twenty Six Defilements To Be Dispelled!

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Re: Twenty Six Defilements To Be Dispelled!

Postby tidathep » Tue Dec 31, 2013 2:19 am

Sawaddee Ka..'hop.pala',

Oh..I' m just a beginner...I can't separate from anything...but I don't do bad things..I try to do good deeds and I try to purify my mind everyday bit by bit.

Truly appreciate that you read my post and comment,
tidathep :namaste:
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Re: Twenty Six Defilements To Be Dispelled!

Postby tidathep » Tue Jan 07, 2014 4:16 pm

Mind-Matter, and Meditation ....Continue!

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

Oh Charles, this is what I practice..sometimes I bought groceries at WalMart..some cashiers were rude to customers by the tone of voice or by make face expression..and I suddenly realized that these cashiers were unhappy with their life/work, and they showed it by being nasty..showing their inferiority. And I thanked the Buddha's dhamma that taught me to know about people's minds/behaviors and helped me to forgive them.

***************
Mind-Matter, and Meditation
[written By Charles.S.Perera]


Aversion (Dōsa)
Aversion is the intense dislike towards a person or a thing. The Pāli word Dōsa has a wide meaning. It could mean anger, hatred, repugnance or jealousy. Even fear is rooted in aversion (dōsa). It is not only a person , an animal, or an objects, may cause fear. An imagined situation, ill health, accidents or possible loss of persons or property may also cause fear. This gives rise to remorse, sorrow, worry, pain and mental disturbance. We can reduce the arising of thoughts rooted in aversion (dōsa), if we learn to look at these resulting emotions with equanimity (upekkhā).

A physician or psychologist may not even find the cause of some of the physical or psychological ailments resulting from thoughts rooted in aversion. It is only through wisdom developed in meditation that one may discover the latent aversions. The greed and attachment cause aversion to arise. We often let our minds drift into the past regretting our past actions, or into the future planning to make amends for what we have failed to do. This result in sorrow, worry and remorse causing the accumulation of unwholesome kamma rooted in aversion (dōsa). When there is aversion, delusion (mōha) is invariably present.

When some one dear to us passes away we are struck by sorrow, resulting in lamentation, pain, grief and despair. We beat our chests and wail to rid ourselves of sadness. But there is nothing extraordinary about death, it is an inevitable consequense of birth. But our sorrow stems from our inability to grasp the true meaning of the words of the Buddha, that every thing that arises passes away (sabbē sa.nkhāra anicchā) . The cause of sadness is the attachment to oneself, the death of another is taken as a personsal loss suffered by oneself.

Some thoughts rooted in aversion(dōsa) are easily recognised, while those too subtle escape notice. Anger, and aversion arise from objects that come in contact with our sense faculties the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body, and the mind. Even the sensations of cold and heat may give rise to unwholesome thoughts rooted in aversion (dōsa mūla akusal citta). We like to see pleasant objects, hear cheerful comforting words, enjoy sweet tastes, when such things are not available there is dissatisfaction and anger. These emotions arise from thoughts which are rooted in aversion (dōsa mūla akusala citta) .

Yet another reason for arising of thoughts rooted in aversion, is not searching to understand the reason for anger, or aversion, which is again due to the lack of understanding, that nothing arises without a cause. Feeling, seeing or hearing whatever is unpleasant, is a resultant kamma (kamma vipāka). If some one were to insult us, we get angry. But one who understands the working of kamma according to the Buddha’s teachings will understand that hearing those unpleasant words is the result of a previous kamma (kamma vipāka).

The person who insults is only the proximate cause for bad kamma to take effect. This interpretation of the situation , would help to understand the reality and dispel anger and enmity. But the one who insulted, though he is merely the proximate cause that activated our past kamma, will not escape scot-free, without he himself accumulating unwholesome kamma rooted in aversion, to which he has to pay in “kind” in this very life or another !

Thus, understanding thoughts, and recognising their causative link would help us reduce the accumulation of unwholesome kamma .

*************to be continued
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Re: Twenty Six Defilements To Be Dispelled!

Postby tidathep » Sun Jan 12, 2014 5:57 pm

Sawaddee Ka

This part of the book makes me ask myself...Do I have doubt about the Buddhas/Dhamma/Sangha ??? The answer is no no no !!! This delusion never cross my mind.

Image

Mind-Matter, and Meditation
[written By Charles.S.Perera]


Delusion(Mōha)

Delusion(mōha) causes confusion in the mind. All unwholesome thoughts contain a greater or a lesser degree of delusion. Thoughts rooted in greed (lōbha) and aversion (dōsa) do not arise alone, but with delusion(mōha) as an accessory. Thoughts rooted in delusion (mōha mūla citta) are thoughts that have delusion as its cause of arising. Sceptical Doubt (vicikicchā), doubt about the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha , and restlessness (uddacca) are two such thoughts. Delusion springs from ignorance, lack of comprehension, or stupidity.

The ignorance of the reality of conventional truth (sammuti sacca), and taking the nomenclature that distinguishes the nature around us as reality, when in fact they are only concepts, is also due to delusion. Because of this, there is a constant accumulation of unwholesome kamma resulting from thoughts rooted in desire (lōbha mūla akusala citta).

Sceptical doubt (vicikicchā), concerns doubt about the Buddha, his teachings and the order of Sangha. The doubt whether there was in fact a historical Buddha, and whether the Tripitaka the Buddhist cannon actually contains the words of the Buddha, whether the order of Sangha was the true guardian of the Dhamma, and doubting the possibility of the existence of Nibbana, fall into the category of sceptical doubt. These doubts (vicikicchā) are unwholesome thoughts rooted in delusion (mōha mūla akusala citta).

It is the correct understanding of mentality-materiality (nāma-rūpa) that may dispel doubt. The reason being that doubt (vicikicchā) is only a mental factor( cētasika) and nothing else. The understanding of the reality of mentality- materiality comes through meditation. There are three ways of understanding Dhamma that would clear sceptical doubt:

(a) through listening, reading and discussing Dhamma (sūtamaya paññā)
(b) through contemplating on what has been read, heard or discussed (cintāmaya paññā)
(c) through experience in meditation (bhāvanāmaya paññā)

*************to be continued
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