Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

No holds barred discussion on the Buddhadharma. Argue about rebirth, karma, commentarial interpretations etc. Be nice to each other.

Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Thu Nov 14, 2013 3:00 pm

5 Powers(balas)

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

Wold you believe that 2 men became online-kalayanamittas for 13 years without meeting each other in person?? True friendship between Dr.Han Tun and Tep is incredible!!


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5 Powers(balas)
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma/JTN]


Brother Han was very good at quoting from precise Dhamma books with emphasis on the Abhidhamma. His reliable and accurate Pali quotes have been useful for me for clearer understanding.

[Han Tun:] "Bala or 'powers' consist of (1) faith (saddhá), (2) energy (viriya), (3) mindfulness (sati), (4) concentration (samádhi), and (5) wisdom (paññá). Their particular aspect, distinguishing them from the corresponding 5 spiritual faculties (indriyas), is that they are unshakable by their opposites or patipakkha akusala dhammas, as follows.
(1) the power of faith is unshakable by tanha; (2) the power of energy is unshakable by kosajja or laziness; (3) the power of mindfulness is unshakable by mutthasacca or forgetfulness; (4) the power of concentration is unshakable by vikkhepa or distractedness; (5) the power of wisdom is unshakable by sammoha or ignorance. They represent, therefore, the aspect of firmness in the spiritual faculties.


"Ledi Sayadaw (1846-1923), in his “Bodhipakkhiya Dipani”, wrote that there are two kinds of balas: (1) pakati-balas, and (2) bhaavanaa-balas. Pakati-balas are the ones which are not developed through specific practice, and as such they cannot overcome their respective opposites, and in fact they themselves are overwhelmed by their opposites. Whereas, bhaavanaa-balas, which have their genesis in the successful practice, such as aanaapaanasati or kaayagataasati, can dispel their respective opposites.

"That'’s why they are defined as “patipakkha dhamme baliyantiti balani” (suppresses opposition, hence they are called balas); or, as “akampanatthena balani (whenever opposition is encountered, there is fearless firmness, hence they are called balas)."
http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Sari ... sages/1763
.............

And I truly appreciate learning from his message that such developed spiritual powers (through 'citta bhaavana') are unshakable by the five enemies (patipakkha) of training, namely: tanha or greed, kosajja or laziness, mutthasacca or forgetfulness, vikkhepa or distractedness, and sammoha or ignorance.

Reference:
http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Sari ... ages/22525

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Thu Nov 21, 2013 3:35 pm

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I love love this 'decoy simile' and this beautiful painting.
....and this lovely morning, November-rain is falling..I remember the song...NOVEMBER RAIN ..It is the longest song to reach the top 10 of the Billboard Hot 100. .won the best song award of the year:

NOVEMBER RAIN : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDLrrwWxejM

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Dvedhavitakka Sutta : Decoy Simile
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma]


What is a decoy? It is a lure, attraction, bait, trap, inducement, enticement, ensnarement. Examples: A living or artificial bird or other animal used to entice game into a trap or within shooting range. An enclosed place, such as a pond, into which wildfowl are lured for capture.

In MN 19, Dvedhavitakka Sutta, the Buddha gave an interesting decoy simile in which decoy stands for tanha-raaga and avijja.
.........
"Suppose, monks, that in a forested wilderness there were a large low-lying marsh, in dependence on which there lived a large herd of deer; and a certain man were to appear, not desiring their benefit, not desiring their welfare, not desiring their rest from bondage. He would close off the safe, restful path that led to their rapture, and would open up a false path, set out a male decoy, place a female decoy, and thus the large herd of deer would eventually fall into ruin, disaster, & decimation. Then suppose that a certain man were to appear to that same large herd of deer, desiring their benefit, desiring their welfare, desiring their rest from bondage. He would open up the safe, restful path that led to their rapture, would close off the false path, take away the male decoy, destroy the female decoy, and thus the large herd of deer would eventually come into growth, increase, & abundance.

"I have given this simile in order to convey a meaning. The meaning is this: 'The large, low-lying marsh' stands for sensuality. 'The large herd of deer' stands for beings. 'The man not desiring their benefit, not desiring their welfare, not desiring their rest from bondage' stands for Mara, the Evil One. 'The false path' stands for the eightfold wrong path, i.e., wrong view, wrong resolve, wrong speech, wrong action, wrong livelihood, wrong effort, wrong mindfulness, & wrong concentration. 'The male decoy' stands for passion & delight. 'The female decoy' stands for ignorance. 'The man desiring their benefit, desiring their welfare, desiring their rest from bondage' stands for the Tathagata, the Worthy One, the Rightly Self-awakened One. 'The safe, restful path that led to their rapture' stands for the noble eightfold path, i.e., right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, & right concentration.

"So, monks, I have opened up the safe, restful path, closed off the false path, removed the male decoy, destroyed the female. Whatever a teacher should do —seeking the welfare of his disciples, out of sympathy for them — that have I done for you. Over there are the roots of trees; over there, empty dwellings. Practice jhana, monks. Don't be heedless. Don't later fall into regret. ...

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Wed Nov 27, 2013 2:51 pm

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I can say again and again that I truly believe everything I read in the Tipitaka..I'll die practicing Buddhas' Dhamma.


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Indriya samvara
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma/JTN]


Talking about restraint of the sense faculties, it is useful to exercise restraint --indriya samvara-- in two levels: (I) Simply keep watching an external sense object with detachment (not getting involved). (II) After the mind has stopped following any external sense object, then observe only the mind to dispel greed and distress, i.e. not becoming pleased nor displeased with anything, and continue to maintain that equanimity.
.............

"Observe the sensations that arise at each of the sense doors to see that they're just sensations happening, pure and simple. It's not the case that we're sensing these things. For instance, the eye sees forms. It's not us that's seeing them. There's simply the seeing of forms by means of eye-consciousness, pure and simple. At that point, there's not yet any labeling of the sight as good or bad. There's not yet any thought fabrication following on the sensation of contact. We simply watch the simple sensation and then stop right there, to see the characteristics of the sensation as it passes away or as it's replaced by a new sensation. We keep watching the passing away of sensations, keep watching until we see that this is simply the nature of the eyes and ears: to register sensations. That way we don't latch onto them to the point where we give rise to suffering and stress the way we used to."

"We have to focus on the mind, which is the factor in charge, the stem point. If we exercise restraint over the mind, then that, in and of itself, keeps all the sense doors restrained. The eye will be restrained in seeing sights: involvement in seeing will get shorter. When the ear hears sounds, the mind can stay neutral as it focuses on being alert to the arising and passing away of sounds or on the sensation of sound as it constantly comes and goes. This all depends on which approach helps you stay observant of sensory contact. Otherwise, if you don't develop these approaches, everything gets thrown into confusion. The mind has nothing but attachments and feelings of self, giving rise to all sorts of suffering simply from its lack of restraint."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai ... plook.html

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Tue Dec 03, 2013 3:31 pm

Sawaddee Ka :anjali:

This early morning at 5 AM..not so cold..I went out walking-meditation..no moon..many stars twinkle..then I saw a falling star not so far from me..I wish I could find it on the street so I could save it in my pocket... my mom loved this song:

Catch a falling star
: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5t_PDU5RmBw

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Beautiful Wisteria flowers for my mom..

Daily Dhamma
[From Dhamma Group]

* Give regularly. The daily Buddhapuja (offering of food, lamp light, incense sticks, flowers and such to the Lord Buddha) should especially not be forgotten. Regularly offer things to the Sangha. Be generous towards your family and friends as well as beggars and animals.

* Protect your 5 or 8 precepts perfectly. Don't let even a small stain occur in your virtue. If a precept is broken do not despair; re-establish yourself in that precept.

* Meditate at least twice a day for more than 20 minutes per sitting. Metta, karuna, mudita, upekkha, buddhanussati, dhammanussati, sanghanussati, marananussati, silanussati, devanussati, anapanasati, asubha and other such mediation topics are all suitable. Trial a few and see which ones help your mind to become calm and choose those meditations as suitable topics. Seek guidance from a suitable meditation teacher. At all times develop the mind with metta, karuna, mudita, upekkha and marananussati.

* Listen to Dhamma sermons regularly. Read Dhamma books, articles, magazines regularly. Enagage in Dhamma-dana, or the giving and distribution of the Dhamma to the world.* Be of service to the world according to your abilities and strengths. In this give priority to protecting the rapidly declining and rare Buddhist dispensation (Buddha-sasana).


* Keep good friends close to your life
. Keep bad friends far from your life.

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Fri Dec 06, 2013 3:33 pm

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

I love love this 'Saddhamma'...very hard to achieve...but I'll die trying..if it takes forever.


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Saddhamma and Sekha Pa.tipada
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma]


In SN 55.5, Dutiya-Saariputtasutta.m, the Great Arahant said this: "Listening to the true Dhamma(Saddhammasavana.m) is a factor for stream-entry." Saddhamma consists of the seven dhammas:

1. Saddha (conviction; faith)
2. Sati (mindfulness)
3. Hiri (moral shame)
4. Ottappa (moral dread)
5. Bahusacca (great learning)
6. Viriya (energy; exertion; endeavor)
7. Pa~n~naa (wisdom, insight knowledges).

These seven true dhammas are the wholesome qualities endowed by learners (Sekha), beginning at Sotapanna, who are on the path of practice (pa.tipada) as shown in the Sekha-patipada Sutta.

Only when the Saddhamma is supported by consummation in virtue, guarding of the sense doors, moderation in eating, and devotion to wakefulness, then the four jhanas can be obtained at will --without difficulty, without trouble.

[AN 7.63 Nagara Sutta:]"When a disciple of the noble ones is endowed with seven true qualities (saddhamma) and can obtain at will --without difficulty, without trouble-- the four jhanas, heightened mental states that provide a pleasant abiding in the here-&-now, he is said to be a disciple of the noble ones who can't be undone by Mara, can't be undone by the Evil One.".
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an07/an07.063.than.html

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:08 pm

Sawaddee Ka :anjali:

@ SD/JTN...we always post about making effort to dispel this and that all the time...we need to remind ourselves...because bad habits are so very hard to break.

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Make Effort to Dispel
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma/JTN]


To successfully dispel a bad habit, or any unwholesome behavior, requires a big effort. You have to be determined to never tolerate it anymore even for a moment. No compromise with Mara!

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"Bhikkhus, these seven are powers. What seven? The power of faith, effort, conscience, concern, mindfulness, concentration and wisdom.
"Bhikkhus, what is the power of effort? Here, bhikkhus, the noble disciple abides with aroused effort, to dispel demeritorious things and to amass meritorious things, becomes firm not giving up the main aim in meritorious things. Bhikkhus, this is the power of effort."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

"A monk doesn't acquiesce to an arisen thought of sensuality. He abandons it, dispels it, & wipes it out of existence. He does not tolerate an arisen thought of ill-will. He abandons it, destroys it, dispels it, & wipes it out of existence. He does not tolerate an arisen thought of harmfulness. He abandons it, destroys it, dispels it, & wipes it out of existence. He does not tolerate arisen evil, unskillful mental qualities. He abandons them, destroys them, dispels them, & wipes them out of existence."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Thu Dec 19, 2013 3:15 pm

Sawaddee Ka :heart:

I truly love this question and answer.


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The Three Akusala Mūlas
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma/JTN]


Suppose a new student of Buddhism came to ask you to explain the three akusala mūlas for her:

-How do they arise and what factors make them grow?
-Which one carries greatest blame?
-Which one is slow to fade away?

The Buddha's answer [AN 3.68 Titthiya Sutta] is the following:

-For one who attends inappropriately (ayoniso-manasikāro) to the theme (sign, nimitta) of the attractive, unarisen passion arises and arisen passion tends to growth & abundance.

-For one who attends inappropriately to the theme of irritation, unarisen aversion arises and arisen aversion tends to growth & abundance.

-For one who attends inappropriately, unarisen delusion arises and arisen delusion tends to growth & abundance.

**** Passion carries little blame and is slow to fade.

**** Aversion carries great blame and is quick to fade.

****Delusion carries great blame and is slow to fade.

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Mon Dec 23, 2013 2:44 pm

Sawaddee Ka :anjali:

I truly love this simile..simile makes me understand the dhamma clearly.


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Alagaddupama Sutta : The Snake Simile
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ Sariputtadhamma]


Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu's introduction on the snake simile in MN 22 is interesting :

"This is a discourse about clinging to views (ditthi). Its central message is conveyed in two similes, among the most famous in the Canon: the simile of the water-snake and the simile of the raft. Taken together, these similes focus on the skill needed to grasp right view properly as a means of leading to the cessation of suffering , rather than an object of clinging, and then letting it go when it has done its job."

[MN 22, Alagaddupama Sutta:] "Suppose, monks, a man wants a snake, looks for a snake, goes in search of a snake. He then sees a large snake, and when he is grasping its body or its tail, the snake turns back on him and bites his hand or arm or some other limb of his. And because of that he suffers death or deadly pain. And why? Because of his wrong grasp of the snake.

"Similarly, O monks, there are here some foolish men who study the Teaching; having studied it, they do not wisely examine the purpose of those teachings. To those who do not wisely examine the purpose, these teachings will not yield insight. They study the Teaching only to use it for criticizing or for refuting others in disputation. They do not experience the (true) purpose for which they (ought to) study the Teaching. To them these teachings wrongly grasped, will bring harm and suffering for a long time. And why? Because of their wrong grasp of the teachings."

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Sat Dec 28, 2013 3:51 pm

Sawaddee Ka :reading:

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"Rebirth, friend, is painful; non-rebirth is pleasant"
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ SD/JTN]


Arahant Sāriputta said this in AN 10.65, Pathamasukha suttam:

"Rebirth, friend, is painful; non-rebirth is pleasant. [Abhinibbatti kho āvuso dukkhā, anabhinibbatti sukhā]

"When, friend, there is rebirth, this pain is to be expected: cold and heat, hunger and thirst, excrement and urine, contact with fire, contact with punishment, contact with weapons, and anger caused by meeting and associating with relatives and friends.
"When, friend, there is rebirth, this pain is to be expected."

"When, friend, there is no rebirth, this pleasantness is to be expected: neither cold nor heat, neither hunger nor thirst, neither excrement nor urine, neither contact with fire, nor contact with punishment, nor contact with weapons, and no anger caused by meeting and associating with relatives and friends. "When, friend, there is no rebirth, this pleasantness is to be expected." [Anabhinibbattiyā āvuso sati idaṃ sukhaṃ pāṭikaṅkhanti.]

I understand that such pleasantness of no rebirth is Nibbāna.
.........

Pali Corner:
According to the Nyanatiloka Dictionary, "nibbatti : 'arising', 'rebirth', is a synonym for patisandhi " and abhinibbatti is "a Sutta term for rebirth".

This dictionary defines 'patisandhi' as follows:

"Patisandhi: lit. 'reunion, relinking', i.e. rebirth, is one of the 14 functions of consciousness viññāna-kicca . It is a kamma-resultant type of consciousness and arises at the moment of conception i.e. with the forming of new life in the mother's womb. Immediately afterwards it sinks into the subconscious stream of existence bhavanga-sota , and conditioned thereby ever and ever again corresponding states of subconsciousness arise. Thus it is really rebirth-consciousness that determines the latent character of a person."

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:00 pm

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

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A Definition Of Saddha/A True Monk
[Presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @ SD/JTN]


Bhikkhu Bodhi succinctly gives a defintion of saddha (faith, conviction)--the first of the five spiritual faculties (indriya):

"If we examine faith more closely, we would see that besides its emotive ingredients, it also involves a cognitive component. This consists in a readiness to accept the Buddha as the unique discoverer and proclaimer of liberating truth. Seen from this angle, faith necessarily involves a decision. ... As a decision, faith also entails acceptance. It involves a willingness to open oneself to the principles made known by the Enlightened One and adhere to them as trustworthy guides to knowledge and conduct."
"It is this decision that separates those who take up the practice of insight meditation as a purely naturalistic discipline from those who practice it within the framework of the Buddhist faith."


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... ay_45.html

Those who practice meditation within the framework of the Buddhist faith are monks and lay Buddhists. However, faith alone just opens the door to knowledge and conduct. True monks are endowed with other dhammas such as indriya-samvara and relinquishment.

Dhp 362. He who has control over his hands, feet and tongue; who is fully controlled, delights in inward development, is absorbed in meditation, keeps to himself and is contented — him do people call a monk.

Dhp 367. He who has no attachment whatsoever for the mind and body, who does not grieve for what he has not — he is truly called a monk.

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby tidathep » Mon Jan 06, 2014 4:26 pm

Sawaddee Ka :namaste:

I'm so happy that nowaday I have no stress...my life is so peaceful...I love Buddhas/Dhamma, I practice Buddhas' Dhamma and my mind is so calm/peaceful.


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Characteristic Of Change : Viparināma Lakkhana
[presented by Dr.Tep Sastri @SD/JTN]


This is stated in the Patisambhidamagga: "He who sees the characteristic of change sees the fall of the consciousness aggregate." The Pali words for "characteristic of change" is viparināma lakkhana. Viparināmā anupassanā is the principal insight into change. And we have seen the term viparināma dukkhatā in the Dukkha Sutta, SN 38.14:

"There are these three forms of stressfulness, my friend: the stressfulness of pain, the stressfulness of fabrication, the stressfulness of change. These are the three forms of stressfulness." [dukkhadukkhatā sankhāradukkhatā viparināmadukkhatā]

Dukkha Sutta: Stress
[translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu © 1999]


On one occasion Ven. Sariputta was staying in Magadha in Nalaka Village. Then Jambukhadika the wanderer went to Ven. Sariputta and, on arrival, exchanged courteous greetings with him. After this exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies, he sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to Ven. Sariputta:

Jambukhadika: "'Stress, stress,' it is said, my friend Sariputta. Which type of stress [are they referring to]?"

Sariputta: "There are these three forms of stressfulness, my friend: the stressfulness of pain, the stressfulness of fabrication, the stressfulness of change. These are the three forms of stressfulness."

Jambukhadika: "But is there a path, is there a practice for the full comprehension of these forms of stressfulness?"

Sariputta: "Yes, there is a path, there is a practice for the full comprehension of these forms of stressfulness."

Jambukhadika: "Then what is the path, what is the practice for the full comprehension of these forms of stressfulness?"

Sariputta: "Precisely this Noble Eightfold Path, my friend — right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration. This is the path, this is the practice for the full comprehension of these forms of stressfulness."

Jambukhadika: "It's an auspicious path, my friend, an auspicious practice for the full comprehension of these forms of stressfulness — enough for the sake of heedfulness."

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Re: Daily Dhamma : I Have Nothing!

Postby muni » Tue Jan 07, 2014 11:45 am

"There are these three forms of stressfulness, my friend: the stressfulness of pain, the stressfulness of fabrication, the stressfulness of change. These are the three forms of stressfulness."

Thank you Tidathep, this is remembering to not forget impermanence. :namaste:
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