Kwan yin/Avalokiteśvara

Kwan yin/Avalokiteśvara

Postby gingercatni » Fri Dec 30, 2011 7:15 pm

I know Avalokiteśvara is Amitabha's consort, but what role does Kwan yin have in relation to pureland followers? There are a few verses of my daily practice that I mention Kwan Yin, but nothing soley directed to him/her so am I missing anything?

Thanks
gingercatni
 
Posts: 98
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 5:09 pm
Location: Belfast Northern Ireland

Re: Kwan yin/Avalokiteśvara

Postby tktru » Fri Dec 30, 2011 8:09 pm

Guanyin/Avalokitesvara is Amitabha's most senior disciple, not a consort of Amitabha.

Much like how Amitabha Buddha vowed to bring those who call out to him in nianfo/nembutsu to the Pure Land, Avalokitesvara's role is to "observe the sounds of the world", i.e. listening to the cries of suffering beings. Also, Avalokitesvara can be interpreted as the compassionate aspect of Amitabha.

As this praise commonly recited in Pure Land temples implies:

蓮池讚
蓮池海會。彌陀如來。觀音勢至坐蓮臺。
接引上金階。大誓弘開。普願離塵埃。

In the vast lotus pool assembly, Amitabha Tathagata
together with Avalokitesvara and Mahasthamaprapta
receives us and leads us to ascend the lotus platforms.
With great Vows they teaching expansively,
so that beings universally resolve to leave defilement
User avatar
tktru
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:36 am

Re: Kwan yin/Avalokiteśvara

Postby Mr. G » Sat Dec 31, 2011 12:30 am

gingercatni wrote:I know Avalokiteśvara is Amitabha's consort, but what role does Kwan yin have in relation to pureland followers?


Actually, Avalokiteśvara isn't Amitabha consort. Avalokitesvara in the Pure Land sutras is one of the two Bodhisattvas who conduct the dead into the presence of Amitayus. Because of this reason, Avalokitesvara is generally
portrayed in Buddhist art with a seated figure of Buddha Amitayus (Amitabha) on his head, and is occasionaly spoken of as an emanation of Amitayus. The Karandavyuha Sutra along with the Avalokitesvara chapter of the Lotus Sutra also recounts the acts of Avalokitesvara.

You may enjoy this older thread with an animation of Avalokitesvara as well:

viewtopic.php?f=39&t=6103

There are a few verses of my daily practice that I mention Kwan Yin, but nothing soley directed to him/her so am I missing anything?


No. The core practice is Nian-Fo. There is one liturgy by Venerable Wu Ling (student of Venerable Master Chin Kung) that is good and concise:

Put palms together. Do one bow, three prostrations, one bow.
Place container of water in front of Amitabha Buddha image.
Light incense if desired.
Put palms together, bow once and say what is in quote marks.


“Homage to our original teacher Sakyamuni Buddha”
(One bow)
(Repeat three times)
“Homage to Amitabha Buddha”
(One bow)
(Sitting or walking meditation while mindfully chanting)
“Amituofo”
(When finished, stand and put palms together)
“Homage to Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva”
(One bow)
“Homage toMahasthamaprapta Bodhisattva”
(One bow)
“Homage to the great pure sea-vast assembly of
bodhisattvas.”
(One bow)

“All evil actions committed byme
since time immemorial,
stemming from greed, anger, and ignorance,
arising from body, speech, and mind,
I deeply repent having committed.”
(One bow)
“May the merits and virtues accrued from this work
adorn the Buddha’s Pure Land,
repay the Four Kindnesses above,
and relieve the sufferings of those
in the Three Paths below.
May those who see or hear of this
bring forth the Bodhi mind,
and at the end of this life,
be born together in the Land of Ultimate Bliss.”
(One bow, three prostrations, one bow)

http://www.scribd.com/doc/76812109/In-O ... d-Buddhism
Pg. 50.


There's also a liturgy by Professor Li Ping-Nan who was one of Venerable Master Chin Kung's teachers:

1. Recite: “Homage to our teacher, Shakyamuni, Buddha of loving-kindness and compassion.”
(During this recitation, bow or hold your palms together in front of your chest.)

2. Recite: “Homage to Amitabha, Buddha of great loving-kindness and compassion.” (Again,
bow or hold your palms together in front of your chest.)

3. Recite “Namo Amitabha” or “Namo Amitabha Buddha” at least 100 times – the more
repetitions, the better. You can kneel, sit, or stand. There is no need to bow, but be
respectful and sincere. You can increase the number of recitations you do each day, but
you should not decrease them.

4. Recite: “Namo Guan Shi Yin Bodhisattva”. (Recite and bow once).

5. Recite “Namo Da Shi Zhi Bodhisattva” or “Homage to Great Strength Bodhisattva”.
(Recite and bow once.) (Guan Shi Yin [or Guan Yin] and Da Shi Zhi [or Great Strength
Bodhisattva] are Amitabha Buddha’s two great assistants in the Pure Land; together; the
three are known as the The Sages of the World of Ultimate Bliss. They are our teachers
and friends, and we bow to them to show our respect.

6. Recite: “Homage to the Great Pure Sea of Bodhisattvas.” (Recite and bow once) There
are many Bodhisattvas in the World of Ultimate Bliss. They are all our future teachers
and friends.

7. Recite the following Verse for the Transference of Merit: “I vow to adorn the Buddha’s pure
land with this merit. Repay the four gracious kindnesses and aid those in the three paths
of suffering below. May those who see and hear my vow all bring forth the Bodhi mind.
And when this life is finished, may we be born together with other devotees in the World
of Ultimate Bliss.” (This declaration is to direct the merits of reciting the Buddha’s name
to glorify Buddha’s pure land, to help those named in this paragraph, and to affirm our
determination to be born in the World of Ultimate Bliss. A different version of a recitation
for the transfer of merit is presented on the page titled “Dedication of Merit”.)

8. Bow.

The preceding exercises should be performed twice every day: in the morning and in the
evening. You should clean your hands and rinse your mouth before starting your recitation. You
can omit the bowing if there is no portrait of Buddha to bow to. If possible, you can light some
incense before you begin, but you can omit the burning of incense if it is inconvenient. You
should face to the west if possible, and you should be sincere.
If time permits, between Steps 2 and 3 you should recite the “Amitabha Sutra” once, the
“Vow to Achieve Birth in the Pure Land”:
“We wish to be born in the Western Pure Land
From nine levels of lotus blossoms.
When the lotus opens,
We shall see the Buddha and shall be enlightened to the eternal Truth,
With Bodhisattvas who never regress on the Path as our companions.”

three times, and the “Verse in Praise of Amitabha” once:
“Amitabha’s body is the color of gold;
The splendor of his hallmarks has no peer.
The light of his brow shines around a hundred worlds;
Wide as the seas are his eyes pure and clear.
Shining in his brilliance by transformation
Are countless Bodhisattvas and infinite Buddhas.
His forty-eight vows will be our liberation;
In nine lotus-stages we reach the farthest shore.
Homage to the Buddha of the Western Pure Land,
Kind and Compassionate Amitabha!
Homage to Amitabha Buddha!”

http://www.scribd.com/doc/76812115/A-Sp ... s-Lifetime
Pg. 4


And of course there are Japanese liturgies used in Jodo Shu and Jodo Shinshu.
    How foolish you are,
    grasping the letter of the text and ignoring its intention!
    - Vasubandhu
User avatar
Mr. G
 
Posts: 4098
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 6:36 am
Location: Spaceship Earth

Re: Kwan yin/Avalokiteśvara

Postby gingercatni » Sat Dec 31, 2011 1:14 am

I suppose really what I'm asking, is while I do my daily practice each day, is there some element where I should include kwan yin/Avalokitesvara? he/she seems a very revered bodhisattva and I give him/her very little attention, should I make a shrine to him/her? confused :shrug:
gingercatni
 
Posts: 98
Joined: Fri Feb 11, 2011 5:09 pm
Location: Belfast Northern Ireland

Re: Kwan yin/Avalokiteśvara

Postby Mr. G » Sat Dec 31, 2011 1:18 am

gingercatni wrote:I suppose really what I'm asking, is while I do my daily practice each day, is there some element where I should include kwan yin/Avalokitesvara? he/she seems a very revered bodhisattva and I give him/her very little attention, should I make a shrine to him/her? confused :shrug:


Is it required? No. However if you feel a connection to Kwan yin/Avalokiteśvara, then why not? :smile:

I've seen many Pure Land Buddhists have altars set up with Avalokiteśvara on the left and Mahāsthāmaprāpta on the right with Amitabha in the middle.
    How foolish you are,
    grasping the letter of the text and ignoring its intention!
    - Vasubandhu
User avatar
Mr. G
 
Posts: 4098
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 6:36 am
Location: Spaceship Earth


Return to Pure Land

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests

>