Pure Land practice and community for the isolated

Pure Land practice and community for the isolated

Postby dsaly1969 » Fri Nov 02, 2012 5:01 am

HI all,

Namu Amida Butsu!

I am relatively new to Jodo Shu although I do have some background with Jodo Shinshu and Rissho Kosei-kai. It has been the Pure Land teachings that have had the biggest pull on me (knowing myself as bonpu) and I have benefitted from what I have read from Shin Buddhist and Chinese Pure Land sources such as Master Chin Kung. My Pure Land practice has been influenced by the materials from the Chinese Pure Land masters and teachers (such as the free materials available through Amida Society - I really like the "Awaken to the Buddha Within" CD set). I am more comfortable with the external practice emphasis of Jodo Shu as compared with the focus on monpo (deep listening) and "nonpractice" in the Shin tradition although I think good Pure Land practice should really straddle both. I do find the literalist/"modernist" argument as to whether Amida and the Pure Land are metaphors for Dharmakaya or literally real to be often misguided (it is not a matter of "either/or" but, IMHO, is really more about being that and MORE). I do find that the philosophical writings from the Chinese and Vietnamese Pure Land schools help to mitigate this issue to my satisfaction.

Generally I refer to myself as a "Pure Land Buddhist" rather than identifying with a specific school anyways as I freely borrow insights from all of the Pure Land traditions. Ironically at the same time I have felt a pull to study more Theravada materials and a focus on the core teachings of Buddhism which has also helped my practice.

On a daily basis I try to use the Ten Recitation Method of Nembutsu advocated by Master Chin Kung (it comes out to ten cycles of ten recitations per day which means a minimum of 100 recitations per day) as well as the morning and evening recitation of the Jodo Shu liturgy. When I ran across the Jodo Shu North America Buddhist Missions, it was with a sense of "a-ha". Part of my disconnect with the other traditions with which I have studied a little has been my isolation from the greater sangha. As an isolated Pure Land Buddhist, I especially appreciate the efforts that are being made by Jodo Shu to do outreach to folks like myself who need an online sangha for practice and support. But I would like to connect to other Pure Land Buddhist communities as well.

http://english.jodoshuna.org/

Any Pure Land resources whether online (like pdf books or even online sanghas/communities) as well as offline would be appreciated as I am an isolated practitioner who is also teaching Buddhadharma to my two teens. Thanks!

Gassho,

Dave
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Re: Pure Land practice and community for the isolated

Postby Kaji » Tue Nov 06, 2012 8:34 am

I highly recommend the teachings of Ven Yin Guang. I am not sure if there is a complete English translation of the whole text.
Namas triya-dhvikānāṃ sarva tathāgatānām!
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Re: Pure Land practice and community for the isolated

Postby Zenshin 善心 » Tue Nov 06, 2012 12:11 pm

I do find the literalist/"modernist" argument as to whether Amida and the Pure Land are metaphors for Dharmakaya or literally real to be often misguided (it is not a matter of "either/or" but, IMHO, is really more about being that and MORE).


:good:

info -

Three Wheels Temple, London
Muryoko: Journal of Shin Buddhism
Amida Net
Echoes of the Name

enjoy, sorry for the Shin bias - I am shockingly ill-informed of other Pure Land traditions (though am trying to rectify that at the moment by reading Honen Shonin).
All beings since their first aspiration till the attainment of Buddhahood are sheltered under the guardianship of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas who, responding to the requirements of the occasion, transform themselves and assume the actual forms of personality.

Thus for the sake of all beings Buddhas and Bodhisattvas become sometimes their parents, sometimes their wives and children, sometimes their kinsmen, sometimes their servants, sometimes their friends, sometimes their enemies, sometimes reveal themselves as devas or in some other forms.


- Ashvaghosa, The Awakening of Faith

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