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thailand political situation - Page 3 - Dhamma Wheel

thailand political situation

Casual discussion amongst spiritual friends.
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appicchato
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby appicchato » Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:30 pm


Virgo
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby Virgo » Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:38 pm



Bankei
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby Bankei » Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:41 pm

Thats true Bhante, but on this occasion my impression is that they were 'lower' than normal. They were being treated like, and were behaving like naughty school boys.

BTW, that link I provided about the documentary :
Australian documentary on Thai royals sparks outrage
Published: 16/04/2010 at 01:50 PM
Online news: Asia

Thailand has protested to the Australian government over the airing of
a documentary critical of the Thai royal family and warned that the
broadcast could affect ties between the nations.


This 2007 picture released by the Thai Royal Bureau shows His Majesty
the King waving to the crowds during his 80th birthday celebrations at
the Grand Palace in Bangkok. Thailand has protested to the Australian
government over the airing of a documentary critical of the Thai royal
family and warned that the broadcast could affect ties between the
nations.
A senior representative from the Thai embassy met with officials from
Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs on Thursday to express his
concern at the programme aired by the Australian Broadcasting
Corporation (ABC).

"The concern is that it might affect the good relations between
Thailand and Australia, especially the people to people relations,"
Saksee Phromyothi, minister-counsellor at the Royal Thai Embassy,
said.

"We consider this an issue matter of national security... because the
royal family, the monarchy, in our constitution is above politics."

Thailand's ambassador designate Kriangsak Kittichaisaree has also
written to ABC managing director Mark Scott to complain about the
programme which could breach Thailand's lese-majeste laws which
prohibit criticism of the royals.

"I regret that an organisation of the ABC's stature has lowered its
own standard by airing the said documentary which is presented in a
manner no different from tabloid journalism," he wrote.

The programme, which aired late Tuesday, was broadcast on the
state-funded station only in Australia and cannot be viewed over the
Internet outside the country.

But Thailand's diplomatic missions in Australia say they have received
complaints about the programme on the monarchy -- which Kittichaisaree
said was "the soul" of the nation and cherished by Thais from all
walks of life.

"I presume that once you have decided to put this hyper-sensitive
programme on air, a protest letter like mine, which I hope you will
seriously heed, should come as no surprise," Kittichaisaree wrote to
Scott.

"I strongly express both resentment and disappointment with the poor
decision you have made."

The ABC could not immediately be reached for comment. But a report in
the Australian newspaper said the ABC had effectively shut down its
Bangkok office, sending its local staff home until further notice.

A spokesman for Australia's Department for Foreign Affairs and Trade
confirmed that Thai embassy officials had complained about the ABC
programme and noted that the Thai monarchy was a much revered
institution.

"However, the Australian government does not and cannot control
content run by Australian media organisations," he told AFP.

Breaking Thailand's rules on the monarchy have seen prison sentences
of up to 18 years handed down, and Australian writer Harry Nicolaides
was in 2009 sentenced to three years in jail under the law over a
self-published novel.
-----------------------
Bankei

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cooran
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby cooran » Sun Apr 18, 2010 9:40 pm

Hello all,

Let the games begin!


Image

karuna
Chris


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~``



Thailand's elite-backed Yellow Shirts have threatened to take action if the government fails to deal with red-clad protesters within a week, raising fears of clashes between the rival groups.
The ultimatum comes as the military vows to punish anti-government protesters if they marched on Bangkok's central business district.
Red-shirted protesters will face resistance if they protest or try to set up camp in the city's banking district this week in defiance of an emergency decree in place across the capital, the army said.
Army spokesman Sansern Kaewkamnerd stopped short of using the word "crackdown" but said protesters occupying a plush shopping and hotel district for a 16th day would also be dealt with. He did not elaborate and gave no timeframe.
The Red Shirts, who mainly support ex-premier Thaksin Shinawatra, have occupied the capital for over a month with their anti-government campaign, which led to clashes with security forces last weekend leaving 25 people dead.
Thailand is largely split between the poor and rural Reds and the pro-establishment Yellows, who hit the streets ahead of a 2006 coup that ousted their enemy Thaksin and again to see off his allies in 2008.
The Yellows had remained largely silent since the Reds began mass rallies in mid-March demanding immediate elections, but they held a meeting of 3,000 to 5,000 supporters Sunday to discuss a response to the crisis.
"In seven days we hope that the government will deal with the terrorists from Thaksin immediately, otherwise we will show our voice to protect the country and the royal family," said Parnthep Pourpongpan, a spokesman for the Yellow group formally known as the People's Alliance for Democracy (PAD).
The Yellows are calling on the Reds "to value their own lives by not making any untrue statements saying that the government killed the people," Mr Parnthep said.
"The Red Shirts should save their lives by stopping the rally," he said, adding that the PAD's actions would be "according to the constitution".
Yellow protesters in 2008 blockaded Bangkok's two main airports, leading to to a controversial court verdict that ousted Thaksin's allies and allowed a parliamentary vote that brought in the current government.
The Reds, who are campaigning against Thailand's elite in palace, military and bureaucratic circles, say the government's rise to power was illegitimate.
The authorities have so far failed to bring an end to the Reds' mass rallies. A botched attempt to clear areas occupied by the demonstrators triggered the country's deadliest civil unrest in 18 years last weekend.
The government has asked the police's special investigation unit to probe the bloodshed, blaming "terrorists" for inciting violence and accusing Thaksin, who lives abroad to avoid a jail term for graft, of stoking the unrest.
The Reds meanwhile announced plans on Sunday to step up their campaign for snap polls by boosting their numbers on Tuesday in the commercial area they are currently occupying in the heart of the city.
They have so far ignored calls by the authorities to disperse from the shopping heartland, despite security forces being positioned on top of the area's skyscrapers and outstanding arrest warrants in place against core leaders.
Leader Nattawut Saikuar said on Saturday 24 senior Reds would hand themselves over to police on May 15 to avoid another attempt to forcibly arrest them after a bungled operation Friday, but he added that they would seek bail.
"For now the 24 of us will keep rallying to show sincerely that we won't run away," he said.
"I'm sure the order to suppress us will come out soon."
Embattled premier Abhisit Vejjajiva, who cancelled his weekly television broadcast Sunday for unclear reasons, has handed broader powers to his army chief Anupong Paojinda to disperse the protesting crowds.
Emergency services confirmed on Sunday that the death toll from the clashes had increased to 25, while more than 800 people were also wounded.
- AFP/Reuters
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010 ... 876021.htm
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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cooran
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby cooran » Sun Apr 18, 2010 9:43 pm

Hello all,

Not to diminish the seriousness of the situation ~ but I've always felt that Thailand uses politics and different coloured 'uniforms' the way most other countries use football, cricket, hockey rivalries and war-cries.

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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gavesako
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby gavesako » Mon Apr 19, 2010 1:06 pm

What is worrying is the escalation in mutual hatred between the two groups in Thailand now. One group paints the other as destroying the nation and being "terrorist", which can be used to justify even a violent crackdown. Comments such as this on Facebook are becoming very widespread:

"If we have to clash, we will,"says Thai army.
GO ARMY! dont let the red humiliate you again. Bangkokians are with you!


If one remembers the 1976 massacre, similar things were happening before that:

During this time, various extreme rightist organizations were given better support and preparation. The Village Scouts (Thai: ลูกเสือชาวบ้าน) were armed, uniformed, trained and recruited to despise communists and other "un-Thai" characters, and to fight for the "Nation, Religion, and Monarchy" if necessary. The Village Scouts were closely tied to the Border Patrol Police. Other more extreme, underground rightist movements also grew. These included the Red Gaur and Navapol, the violent arm of the ultra-right, who were organized and trained by the Internal Security Operations Command. Anti-communist sentiment and fear mongering was hyped in these organizations to the point that a Buddhist monk, Pra Kittivudho, publicly claimed that killing Communists was not a sin, but meritorious. Many rightist riots, fights, and protests were whipped up to intimidate liberals.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6_October_1976_Massacre

At the same time, the red shirt leaders don't seem to be willing to negotiate and reach a compromise.

This article is written from a neutral point of view and provides a good understanding of the situation:
http://bangkokpost.com/opinion/opinion/ ... -your-bets

A quote from P.A. Payutto พระพรหมคุณาภรณ์ :
"Sometimes we hear people say, 'We need to fight in order to achieve peace.' But how is that possible when from the start there is no peace? Or if they fight, it will not be real peace..."
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

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chownah
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby chownah » Tue Apr 20, 2010 2:28 pm

Making comparisons between what is happening today and the anti-communist atrocities of the 1970's should probably be avoided as the situations are very dissimilar in origin.

In the mid 1970's the US (with Thailand as its major ally in SE Asia) was losing the war with Communist North Vietnam, The Pathet Lao (Communist movement in Laos....which neighbors Thailand) took over Laos and got rid of the royal family (I don't know what or how this happened...violently?..I don't know) and Cambodia was taken over by the Khmir Rouge (again a communist regime backed by communist China) and likewise the royal family there was sidelined in some manner. In Thailand the country side (especially in the northeast) was a stronghold for a growing Thai communist presence with the backing of communists in Laos and Vietnam and the Thai army could not control the region...they could control only some central cities but could not keep the communists from acting outside those areas. The country was under a serious threat of a communist takeover......

Now....the students in a major Thai university decide to demonstrate to show their solidarity with the communists.....this is a formula for disaster and disaster is what happened. The students were actually warned about making the demonstration and were told what would happen but they went ahead anyway.

The actions of the paramilitary (the actual military just stood by and watched the slaughter without interfering) was an atrocity but I think one can see that the feer of a communist takeover of the country with the possible ending of the royal families part in Thai society (if not their deaths outright) was a major factor in brewing up the disaster which happened and nothing like that is in the cards today....I guess.

chownah

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gavesako
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby gavesako » Tue Apr 20, 2010 3:54 pm

There is a very insightful article on this topic here:

http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/newmandal ... -backlash/

... The other major development is that the paranoid discourse of the “nation and monarchy in danger” has been encouraged to flourish. Following the declaration of emergency , on 8 April TAN cable TV’s “Political Hot Pot” show featured Sophon Ongkara lambasting the government for doing too little and too late, and condemning red shirt protestors as “just a bunch of thugs” and “working for Thaksin’s agenda to get rid of the monarchy.”
... The latest development has been a meeting of the PAD at Rangsit University (19 April) where its leadership has announced a 7-day deadline for the government to arrest UDD “terrorists” and to end the red shirt activity, or it will step in. Though this highlights widespread criticism of Abhisit’s government among conservatives for being too soft, it can only aid the government in providing the pressure it needs to force the military to act strongly against remaining red shirt demonstrators, a development already foreshadowed in recent statements of the military as they prepare to protect the Silom area from a planned advance of red shirt demonstrators. Not surprisingly, many concerned observers in Thailand are now comparing the atmosphere of conservative backlash to the paranoia that accompanied the massacre of protesting students in October 1976.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

- Theravada texts
- Translations and history of Pali texts
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cooran
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby cooran » Thu Apr 22, 2010 7:50 am

Hello all,



BANGKOK, Thailand -- Buddhist monk Ajahn Suthep has been showing up at the anti-government Red Shirts rally site in the city but says he is neutral.
“I came as an observer. I’ve learnt to stay above it. I know it. I see it. I understand it but I won’t be it,” he said.
Buddhism is the main religion in Thailand and there are 300,000 monks here.
Ajahn, who has been a monk for 22 years, admits that the political situation in the country has broken society into two and that it is hard even for monks to control their thoughts, feelings and rise above the political divide.
So there are red monks who are anti-government and followers of ousted Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra and yellow monks who are pro-government and for Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva.
“I wish to stay in the middle,” said Ajahn. For him, the political going-ons is like watching a movie.
“You see the movie and you understand it. But if you feel impressed with the movie or you feel sad or joy, that’s emotion. And that’s illusion.” Saying that if a person attaches himself to something, he will suffer.
“But if you empty your mind, you have no suffering when you deal with what’s happening outside,” he said, adding that Buddhism is also active in helping society change and develop.
“You can’t change society outside only but change them also from the inside,” said Ajahn who also conducts Vipassana meditation courses.
Monk Suwichano is chief of training at University Maha Chulalong-korn and believes that monks should not be taking the position that they are in today in Thailand.
He said ups and down and conflicts are the nature of society and monks should not take sides. But the fact is, he said, that about 70% of the monks are with or sympathise with the Red Shirts.
He said there are various reasons why monks have aligned themselves, adding that monks are after all individuals and human, and so there might be some people who they don’t like or they have gone there to give advice to the people and cool them down.
He said monks should be negotiators in conflicts. So would they get involved to find a peaceful resolution for both sides? At this stage, Suwichano believes that the tensions are too high and “cannot be stopped by monks, words or even the king”.
http://www.buddhistchannel.tv/index.php ... 98,0,0,1,0

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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mikenz66
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Apr 22, 2010 9:17 am


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gavesako
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby gavesako » Sat Apr 24, 2010 4:56 pm

When asked how to maintain a balanced perspective on the current conflict in Thailand, what came to my mind is the 4 kinds of "agati" that we have to beware of:

"There are these four ways of going off course (agati). Which four? One goes off course through desire. One goes off course through aversion. One goes off course through delusion. One goes off course through fear. These are the four ways of going off course."

And the opposite:

One is not biased on account of like (i.e. abstaining from chandagati ฉันทาคติ ).
One is not biased on account of hate (i.e. abstaining from dosagati โทสาคติ ).
One is not biased on account of delusion (i.e. abstaining from mohagati โมหาคติ ).
One is not biased on account of fear (i.e. abstaining from bhayagati ภยาคติ ).

A lot of people in Bangkok now probably react out of fear, and also aversion of course.
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

- Theravada texts
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cooran
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby cooran » Sat Apr 24, 2010 9:51 pm

Hello all,

Food for thought:

Posted by Sanitsuda Ekachai

Last line of article:
How many more coffins do we need to see to make us weep together as one? How many more people must die for us to realise that the real demons are not the reds or the yellows out there. It is the fiery anger and hatred we keep nurturing in our hearts.
http://www.bangkokpost.com/blogs/index. ... ns?blog=64

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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forestmat
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby forestmat » Sun Apr 25, 2010 4:52 am

Reports are coming in that helicopters have just flown over the crowd at the Rachaprasong intersection. Two loud bangs have just been heard, I can't confirm what caused this but will update later with more news if I can get down there.

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appicchato
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby appicchato » Sun Apr 25, 2010 5:07 am

Anyone that interested in this situation can go to and click 'thailand news clippings' for an up to date (including Twitter and the rest...) blow by blow account...

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forestmat
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby forestmat » Sun Apr 25, 2010 7:34 am

British Newspaper "The Telegraph" suggests Thailand is on the brink of civil war:


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forestmat
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby forestmat » Sun Apr 25, 2010 2:43 pm

Please stay away from the Saladaeng / ractchadamri intersection..if you are tourists.

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imagemarie
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby imagemarie » Sun Apr 25, 2010 6:31 pm

My daughter is in Krabi at the moment, and likely to pass through Bangkok railway station to get to Chiang Mai in a few days.
I'm not unduly concerned just now, but could the present trouble affect her ?

Thanks

:anjali: Marie.

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gavesako
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby gavesako » Sun Apr 25, 2010 7:08 pm

Revered monk leads prayer for Buddha's blessing
By THE NATION
Published on April 26, 2010

Luang Pho Phra Arjan Araya Wangso, a revered monk from Lampun, led an ancient prayer ceremony at the Temple of the Emerald Buddha yesterday to make merit for the country in time of peril of great magnitude.

Some 1,000 Thais dressed in white also took part in the chanting of the phahung-mahaka, a prayer to enhance phutthakhun or the blessing of the Buddha for the country, Buddhism and the Monarchy.

The chanting of phahung-mahaka took place in the ubosoth (main chapel) of the Temple of the Emerald Buddha at 7am and was part of an event called "Stop One Hour for Thailand".

This prayer ceremony was designed to coincide with the birthday of King Naresuan the Great, who was born on April 25, 1555. The king had led military campaigns to free Siam from the Burmese. Under his reign, Siam achieved the height of her political and military influence as well as territorial gains. Before he went to war, King Naresuan attended a religious ceremony in which the most revered monks of the land prayed for phutthakhun or the blessing of the Buddha.

"If phutthakhun is good, everything will be fine. Our country is still suffering from the old karma. The chanting is to help protect the country from further turmoil," said one person who took part in the prayer ceremony and who asked not to be named.

This ancient prayer, which originated in the time before King Naresuan's reign, is called phahung-mahaka and has nine parts. The monks chanted all parts before repeating them until the end of the ceremony.

After the ceremony, the participants turned their faces to Siriraj Hospital, situated across the Chao Phya River on the Thon Buri side of Bangkok, and sang the Royal Anthem to honour His Majesty the King. The event ended at 9.30am.

Today, the omens for the country are bad, with the stars realigning their positions that will exert particular heat and bad luck and abnormalities upon the country. The bad omens would be similar to the day of April 7, 1767, when Siam lost Ayutthaya to the Burmese army after almost two years of siege.

Jatuporn Promphan, one of the red-shirt leaders, said on Saturday that government troops intended to quash the red shirts and remove them from the streets of Bangkok before 5pm on April 26, 2010. Jatuporn mistook April 26, 1767 as the date of Ayutthya's fall.

Red-shirt astrologers must have predicted the Abhisit government would likely strike the red shirts today, ahead of the bad omens that would hover over Bangkok.

:evil: :spy:
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

- Theravada texts
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gavesako
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby gavesako » Sun Apr 25, 2010 7:22 pm

A moment ago I received this email from a friend in Bangkok:

-------------

Just a quick note on how unrest Bangkok is nowadays.

I just heard a bomb explosion 15 minutes ago! I bet it's around Banharn's house again. (I live near him, 200 meters away). Banharn is the catalyst that made Abhisit the PM. He led his Party to take coalition with Democratic Party to form the gov't. So Banharn has been one of the red shirt subjects. Before Songkran, there were bombs and gunshots around my neighborhood to threaten Banharn to withdraw from the coalition. No one got caught. I had to live in fear, you know. And then, the red mob rallied to his house one day. They use loud speakers to condemn and threaten Banharn again, etc. I had to listen to these guys all day. Very loud and disturbing.

Anyway, a lot of police came quickly since I heard countless sirens coming. And after a few minutes, another gunshot! More police cars came. Yep, this is how the city of angels has become since the red shirts have taken innocent people like us their hostage. My close friends are also losing money on their business in Central World.

The reason I asked you the question was because police seems to be completely under Taksin's control, so they do nothing. No one was ever caught for anything. They just let terrorists get away. While the military is probably half-blooded. The gov't is ineffective and has no authority to order military and police, etc. So people are now talking about "อัตตาหิ อัตตะโน นาโถ - ตนเป็นที่พึ่งแห่งตน". We cannot rely on the gov't, police, military. So we might have to protect ourselves, the nation and the monarchy.

As I write this, a friend reported that 6 people injured from the bombing in front of Banharn's house. I hope their conditions are not serious.

:guns:
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

- Theravada texts
- Translations and history of Pali texts
- Sutta translations

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Cittasanto
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Re: thailand political situation

Postby Cittasanto » Sun Apr 25, 2010 9:54 pm

I hope your friend and all in the area(s) remain safe


He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.


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