Where to start and an ethical dilema?

Moderator: Tibetan Buddhism moderators

Where to start and an ethical dilema?

Postby vajrahorizon » Sat Aug 11, 2012 3:19 am

Hey All,

Like me make a candid confession in my introduction. I am what you might call a spiritual seeker and have passed through pretty much every religious/spiritual tradition that has existed, though while remaining deeply sceptical of the forms of these traditions. My first interest was in Zen and I have been through a plethora since then.

I am in my early 40s and have developed a serious auto-immune condition which leaves me in constant pain and makes life more difficult than it might be otherwise.

I realise this jumping from point A to B and C has left me nothing but a little confused, but at the core of this search was an experience of oneness I had as a little kid and I guess I have been chasing it ever since.

I've always appreciated the Kagyu and Nyingma lineage due to their focus on experiential approaches as I seem to get continuously bogged down in intellectualism and comparing different schools and beliefs when at the core of I went to experience undifferentiated reality.

Any other's experience and advice would be most appreciated.

Regards

Thanks for your insights in advance.

VH

That Lama Ole character really seems divisive... he just seems to be simplifying a complex system and making it friendly to Western seekers - particularly in countries previously under the brutal yoke of communism.
vajrahorizon
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2012 2:04 am

Re: Where to start and an ethical dilema?

Postby Konchog1 » Sat Aug 11, 2012 4:34 am

You sound like me. Welcome.

I recommend you try out Tonglen for your disease.
Equanimity is the ground. Love is the moisture. Compassion is the seed. Bodhicitta is the result.

-Paraphrase of Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Tsephel citing the Guhyasamaja Tantra

"All memories and thoughts are the union of emptiness and knowing, the Mind.
Without attachment, self-liberating, like a snake in a knot.
Through the qualities of meditating in that way,
Mental obscurations are purified and the dharmakaya is attained."

-Ra Lotsawa, All-pervading Melodious Drumbeats
User avatar
Konchog1
 
Posts: 1296
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2011 4:30 am

Re: Where to start and an ethical dilema?

Postby ClearblueSky » Tue Aug 14, 2012 6:05 pm

It makes sense to try different things until you find something that clicks, don't feel bad about it. If you feel a certain connection to those lineages, see if maybe you can find a center near you that you can connect with. Try it out, and read different dharma books to see what you like. It is all part of the path, and we all get overwhelmed!
User avatar
ClearblueSky
 
Posts: 173
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2012 1:27 am

Re: Where to start and an ethical dilema?

Postby viniketa » Tue Aug 14, 2012 10:20 pm

Konchog1 wrote:I recommend you try out Tonglen for your disease.


Good recommendation. :smile:
If they can sever like and dislike, along with greed, anger, and delusion, regardless of their difference in nature, they will all accomplish the Buddha Path.. ~ Sutra of Complete Enlightenment
User avatar
viniketa
 
Posts: 819
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2012 2:39 am
Location: USA

Re: Where to start and an ethical dilema?

Postby Andrew108 » Wed Aug 15, 2012 8:53 am

All traditions have value. And in fact all the traditions you mention have ways to alleviate your problems. But inspiration is important so go with the tradition that inspires you most. I have always been inspired by Milarepa. So I ended up been schooled in the kagyu tradition.
Dharma is definitely powerful enough to ease your suffering. A good teacher and active student who is inspired will definitely make progress. If you want recommendations then ask.
The Blessed One said:

"What is the All? Simply the eye & forms, ear & sounds, nose & aromas, tongue & flavors, body & tactile sensations, intellect & ideas. This, monks, is called the All. Anyone who would say, 'Repudiating this All, I will describe another,' if questioned on what exactly might be the grounds for his statement, would be unable to explain, and furthermore, would be put to grief. Why? Because it lies beyond range." Sabba Sutta.
Andrew108
 
Posts: 1502
Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2011 7:41 pm

Re: Where to start and an ethical dilema?

Postby catmoon » Wed Aug 15, 2012 12:13 pm

vajrahorizon wrote: I went to experience undifferentiated reality.



This will require some steady meditation.

If you take a deep breath, and set aside the thoughts of the day, undifferentiated reality is right there waiting. It is the flow of sensations, the frame of mind, whether good, bad or indifferent. It can be pain or comfort. That is all the reality there is. Everything you are aware of flows through the sense channels and mental awareness.

This is undifferentiated reality, just watching without opinions, without judgement, without attachment. If, while doing this, one watches something beautiful, there is bliss.

Practice this skill of setting aside the thoughts of the day. I find it helps if I remind myself that no matter how important or fascinating a train of thought may be, I can always go back to it later.
Sergeant Schultz knew everything there was to know.
User avatar
catmoon
Former staff member
 
Posts: 3006
Joined: Thu Nov 19, 2009 3:20 am
Location: British Columbia

Re: Where to start and an ethical dilema?

Postby vajrahorizon » Wed Aug 15, 2012 1:29 pm

catmoon wrote:
vajrahorizon wrote: I went to experience undifferentiated reality.



This will require some steady meditation.

If you take a deep breath, and set aside the thoughts of the day, undifferentiated reality is right there waiting. It is the flow of sensations, the frame of mind, whether good, bad or indifferent. It can be pain or comfort. That is all the reality there is. Everything you are aware of flows through the sense channels and mental awareness.

This is undifferentiated reality, just watching without opinions, without judgement, without attachment. If, while doing this, one watches something beautiful, there is bliss.

Practice this skill of setting aside the thoughts of the day. I find it helps if I remind myself that no matter how important or fascinating a train of thought may be, I can always go back to it later.


Good advice, thanks.
vajrahorizon
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2012 2:04 am


Return to Kagyu

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests

>