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How Does One Gain Wisdom? - Dhamma Wheel

How Does One Gain Wisdom?

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
pelletboy
Posts: 109
Joined: Tue May 10, 2011 12:58 pm

How Does One Gain Wisdom?

Postby pelletboy » Wed May 25, 2011 6:07 am

It is said that in a fortunate aeon beings there are wise. How do beings gain wisdom without directly gaining it from the Dhamma? Are beings wise before the appearance of the five Awakened Ones or after their appearance in a fortunate aeon? Are there wise people in ordinary aeons? I observed that many people in this era are wise even without knowing the Dhamma how do they do it without getting lost in treacherous waters of superstitions and false conclusions in their quest for truth and excellence in their mental wanderings and manage to hit the mark of truth more or less most of the time?

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Goofaholix
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Location: New Zealand

Re: How Does One Gain Wisdom?

Postby Goofaholix » Wed May 25, 2011 9:35 am


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daverupa
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Re: How Does One Gain Wisdom?

Postby daverupa » Wed May 25, 2011 11:46 am


pelletboy
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Re: How Does One Gain Wisdom?

Postby pelletboy » Fri May 27, 2011 5:42 am

I think I've also read in a sutta that listening to brahmins leads to wisdom? Can anyone tell me if it is really in the suttas? ANd how does one gain wisdom from brahmins when they themselves can be veiled in ignorance especially in ordinary aeons?

rowyourboat
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Location: London, UK

Re: How Does One Gain Wisdom?

Postby rowyourboat » Fri May 27, 2011 10:39 am

Hi pelletboy,

By Brahmins the Buddha means enlightened monks - not just someone from the Brahmin caste.

In this kalpa (aeon) it is said that 5 Buddhas will arise- hence it is considered a fortunate aeon. I'm not sure whether it is in the suttas but there is some evidence that during the Gautama (current) Buddha's time, kassapa Buddha's teachings were in existence. Buddha's chief rival, Ven Devadatta's disciples only apparently accepted the previous three Buddha's teachings. Also King Asokha was said to have worshiped Kashyapa Buddha's stupa, which since then have been lost, according to one of his inscriptions. So there is some evidence of the four previous Buddhas. One more to go- most monks in Sri Lanka hope for their disciples to meet the coming Buddha- Meteyya, Maithri Buddha.

With metta

Matheesha
With Metta

Karuna
Mudita
& Upekkha

balaji
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue May 31, 2011 4:37 am

Re: How Does One Gain Wisdom?

Postby balaji » Tue May 31, 2011 8:40 am

I think the questioner wants to ask a more fundamental question: "How does wisdom arise in a person to begin with?" The Upanisa Sutta gives some insight.

The process by which one gains wisdom is:
Dukkha > Faith > Joy > Rapture > Serenity > Concentration > yathabhutananadassana > disenchantment > dispassion > Release > knowledge of release

But all of this cannot have started if two conditions were not present.
1. A sentient being should be sensitive to pain or dukkha.
2. That sentient being should have faith in right view.

So the whole path rests on right view. But what exactly is right view, and how does it arise? There are two levels of right view:
1. Rudimentary level: This is the common understanding of the moral code of ethics, and an acceptance of the law of karma. If a person does not accept the law of karma, it is difficult to even begin on the path.
2. Higher level of right view: This view begins with the view that everything in the world is liable to dukkha, and impermanence. The rest of the path builds on this.

But how does right view come about? It comes about under two possible conditions:
1. The word of another: This is the instruction of someone else.
2. Proper attention: If someone pays proper attention to the way nature works, it is possible to see that all worldly experiences are inherently unsatisfactory, and that everything is liable to change. A man of good character, observing this can reflect on this and hence purify himself.

This is how wisdom arises in anyone even without any teacher.


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