The high suicide rates for men

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Re: The high suicide rates for men

Postby theanarchist » Sun Mar 02, 2014 1:09 pm

Nighthawk wrote:
theanarchist wrote:
Having depression or another type of mental illness (the reason for most cases of suicide)


Which is why it's a good thing to adopt Buddhism as one's philosophy as the teachings promote emotional stability and as a result leads to resiliency.



Buddhism (or other religions) are not a suitable therapy for mental illnesses. In the best case religion might help to give a bit of stability and meaning, but I have also encountered people who incorporated their religion into their mental illness, stabilizing it rather than using it to get better. And the religion will NOT fix the mental illness.

So religion in cases of mental illness, that's a two edged sword.
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Re: The high suicide rates for men

Postby Nighthawk » Sun Mar 02, 2014 1:18 pm

theanarchist wrote:
Buddhism (or other religions) are not a suitable therapy for mental illnesses. In the best case religion might help to give a bit of stability and meaning, but I have also encountered people who incorporated their religion into their mental illness, stabilizing it rather than using it to get better. And the religion will NOT fix the mental illness.

So religion in cases of mental illness, that's a two edged sword.


True for serious mental illness. Personally speaking it has done a lot for me in curing my bouts with mild depression and making me mentally stronger than ever before. I am truly blessed to have discovered the Buddhadharma in this lifetime.
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Re: The high suicide rates for men

Postby AlexanderS » Sun Mar 02, 2014 8:52 pm

theanarchist wrote:
Nighthawk wrote:
theanarchist wrote:
Having depression or another type of mental illness (the reason for most cases of suicide)


Which is why it's a good thing to adopt Buddhism as one's philosophy as the teachings promote emotional stability and as a result leads to resiliency.



Buddhism (or other religions) are not a suitable therapy for mental illnesses. In the best case religion might help to give a bit of stability and meaning, but I have also encountered people who incorporated their religion into their mental illness, stabilizing it rather than using it to get better. And the religion will NOT fix the mental illness.

So religion in cases of mental illness, that's a two edged sword.


I think it's purely circumstantial. Fx the mental resilliance and joyfullness of many tibetans is remarkable considering what they have been through and going through.

I think if you have been brought úp with buddhism, I imagine it's an excellent refuge for mental distress.

However for a westerner or non-buddhist meeting the buddhadharma when suffering from severe mentall illness can be very tough. I also think if you have been through horrible stuff and have been treated horribly, the doctrine of karma can be very very tough.
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Re: The high suicide rates for men

Postby Zhen Li » Sun Mar 02, 2014 9:59 pm

In many senses psychiatry is a religion. It has very little empirical backing and claims that alternatives to it are not adequate. Buddhism on the other hand genuinely is empirical, it is based in an observation of the mind to such a subtle degree that psychiatry simply cannot reach. Yes, for some people it can cause a great amount of confusion and madness - but generally not with the guidance of a properly qualified teacher. Those who have gone too far with Buddhism I find are those who try to proceed on the path by themselves, without a teacher and without a methodology - having skill in means is key, because you need to know what to tell people when.

It's really not different if you were brought up with Buddhism. I know just as many people who were raised Buddhists and went a bit mad pursuing it, as people who were not. There actually isn't something magical that happens to the brain if you are raised a Buddhist, you might just be more familiar with the imagery and ceremony from a younger age, and that's about it - it usually doesn't actually mean one is practising Buddhism intently in the strictest sense, unless one is ordained from a young age, and even then, there may be little sincere or comprehended practice until one is an adult.
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