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Suttanta method? - Page 2 - Dhamma Wheel

Suttanta method?

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.
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mikenz66
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Re: Suttanta method?

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Oct 03, 2010 4:00 am


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mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: Suttanta method?

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Oct 03, 2010 5:58 am


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Ytrog
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Re: Suttanta method?

Postby Ytrog » Sun Oct 03, 2010 8:46 am

Thanks to all for your answers. I come to the conclusion that I really need to study the tipitaka more as I see some very interesting links here.
To summarise: the suttanta method tries to base the practise almost exclusively on the methods described in the suttas resulting in a more free-form practice. This would, however need more experience/guidance than a more modern method based on the abhidhamma and the commentaries.

If I understand correctly the commentaries where a bit like an ancient precursor of this forum with far more experienced participants.

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Spiny O'Norman
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Re: Suttanta method?

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Sun Oct 03, 2010 10:38 am


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mikenz66
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Re: Suttanta method?

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Oct 03, 2010 10:36 pm

Hi Spiny,

I don't really know if you can generalise about styles of teachers. If you consider teachers who say that they base their approach primarily on the Suttas you actually have quite a range, from "hard jhana" (e.g. Ajahn Brahm and some of the other Ajahn Chah lineage such as Ajahn Chandako), through a kind of mixed jhana/vipassana-oriented model (e.g. Thanissaro Bhikkhu, Bhante Vimalaramsi, and various others) to more of a vipassana-oriented model (e.g. Ajahn Tiradhammo, Ajahn Munindo, and various others of the Ajahn Chah lineage).

Similarly, if you look at some of the famous Burmese teachers who do make use of commentaries , you also have a range from Pa Auk Sayadaw (who teaches a "hard jhana" that sounds rather similar to what Ajahn Brahm teaches) to the more vipassana-oriented style of Mahasi Sayadaw, Sayadaw/U Pandita/etc, or Sayadaw U Tejaniya.

I normally use a Mahasi-style approach, but I've done a couple of short retreats with Ajahn Tiradhammo (who has been in New Zealand for a few years), and from my point of view there are more similarities than differences. He teaches a different primary object when sitting (breath vs abdomen) and doesn't teach the Mahasi-style noting. Other than that it's the usual Satipatthana stuff, starting with grounding oneself in the body then adding feelings, mind states, etc.

Note that I only mention these particular Bhikkhus because I am familiar with them from books, recordings, or a little personal contact. And you can easily find their teachings on the Internet. [No point in mentioning the various teachers I've had at my local Wat...] Obviously there are thousands of other Theravada teachers, most of whom we in the West don't have access to due to language issues...

Mike


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