The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

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The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

Postby Gary » Wed Jul 04, 2012 7:25 pm

Hello All:

First time posting on Dharma Wheel. After some time studying and practicing Buddhism in a general sense, I have decided to focus my attention on the 'Perfection of Wisdom Sutra in 8,000 lines'. My reason for sharing this with you is in the hope that some of you out there might be able to share any suggestions to for study. I have begun, obviously, with the Edward Conze material, but there seems to be too few sources for its history and alternative renderings.

With Metta-

Gary
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Re: The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

Postby Will » Wed Jul 04, 2012 9:23 pm

In case you have not looked at the Wiki and the notes, bibliography etc. - it will get you started.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prajnapara ... amit.C4.81

This one is listed in the bibliography - looks interesting, but I have not read it:

http://www.southasiabooks.com/studies-i ... 75663.html
One should refrain from biased judgments and doubting in fathoming the Buddha and the Dharma of the Buddhas. Even though a dharma may be extremely difficult to believe, one should nonetheless maintain faith in it. Nagarjuna
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Re: The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

Postby Huifeng » Thu Jul 05, 2012 2:16 am

Gary wrote:Hello All:

First time posting on Dharma Wheel. After some time studying and practicing Buddhism in a general sense, I have decided to focus my attention on the 'Perfection of Wisdom Sutra in 8,000 lines'. My reason for sharing this with you is in the hope that some of you out there might be able to share any suggestions to for study. I have begun, obviously, with the Edward Conze material, but there seems to be too few sources for its history and alternative renderings.

With Metta-

Gary


Hi,

Nice to hear of your interest in the Prajñāpāramitā. Apart from Conze there is still a fair amount of material around, just have to know where to look. You could check out:


CONZE, E (1967): Thirty Years of Buddhist Studies, Munshiram Manoharlal: New Delhi.
CONZE, E (1973): The Perfection of Wisdom in Eight Thousand Lines & Its Verse Summary, Satguru: Delhi.
CONZE, E (1975): The Large Sūtra on Perfect Wisdom, University of California Press: Berkeley.
CONZE, E (1978): The Prajñāpāramitā Literature, Munshiram Manoharlal: New Dehli.
DELEANU, F (2000): “A Preliminary Study of Meditation and the Beginnings of Mahāyāna Buddhism”, pp. 65-114, in the Annual Report of the International Research Institute for Advanced Buddhology at Soka University for the Academic Year 1999, Tokyo.
FRONSDAL, E (1998): The Dawn of the Bodhisattva Path: Studies in a Religious Ideal of Ancient Indian Buddhists with Particular Emphasis on the Earliest Extant Perfection of Wisdom Sūtra, Doctoral Dissertation, Stanford University, UMI.
LANCASTER, L (1968): An Analysis of the Aṣṭasāhasrikā Prajñāpāramitā, University of Wisconsin, unpublished dissertation.
LANCASTER, L R (1974): “An Early Mahāyāna Sermon about the Body of the Buddha and the Making of Images”, in Artibus Asiae, Vol. 36, No. 4. (1974), pp. 287-291.
LANCASTER, L ed. (1977): Prajñāpāramitā and Related Systems, Berkeley Buddhist Studies Series: Berkeley.
LETHCOE, N J (1971): The Bodhisattva Structure in Kumārajīva’s Aṣṭasāhasrikā-Prajñā-pāramitā Sūtra, PhD Dissertation, University of Wisconsin.
RAWLINSON, A (1977): “The Position of the Aṣṭasāhasrikā Prajñāpāramitā in the Develop¬mentn of Early Mahāyāna”, in LANCASTER, L ed. (1977).
MÄLL, L (2005): Studies in the Aṣṭasāhasrikā Prajñāpāramitā and Other Essays, Motilal Banarsidass: Delhi.
NATTIER, J (2010): “Who Wrote the Dà míngdù Jīng 大明度經 (T225)? A Reassess-ment of the Evidence”, pp. 295-337, in Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies, Vol. 31, No. 1-2, 2008 (2010).
SCHMITHAUSEN, L (1977): “Textgeschichtliche Beobachtungen zum 1. Kapitel der Aṣṭa-sāhasrikā Prajñāpāramitā”, pp. 35-82, in LANCASTER, L, ed, (1977).
TSAI, Yao-ming 蔡耀明 (1987): Searching for the Origins of Mahāyāna and Moving Toward a Better Understanding of Early Mahāyāna, University of California, Berkeley, PhD Dissertation, UMI: Ann Arbor.
YUYAMA, Akira 湯山明 (1976): Prajñāpāramitā¬ratna¬guṇa¬saṃcaya-gāthā (Sanskrit Recension A), Edited, With an Introduction, Bibliographical Notes and a Tibetan Version from tunhuang, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.
YUYAMA, Akira 湯山明 (1977): “The First Two Chapters of the Prajñāpāramitā¬ratna¬guṇa-saṃcaya¬gāthā”, pp. 203-220, in Lancaster, L ed, (1977).
YUYAMA, Akira 湯山明 (2001): “Prajñāpāramitā¬ratna¬guṇa¬saṃcaya¬gāthā-Vyākhyā of Hari-bhadra – Preliminary Remarks”, pp. 27-42, in the Annual Report of the International Research Institute for Advanced Buddho¬logy at Soka University for the Academic Year 2001, Tokyo.

There is a lot of stuff in Japanese and Chinese, if you can read these languages, let me know and I'll provide a basic bibliography.

I have written an essay on the various Chinese texts,

ORSBORN, M B (=SHÌ Hùifēng 釋慧峰) (2008b): A Survey of Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra Trans¬lations in Chinese.
Which can be found here: http://prajnacara.blogspot.tw/2008/10/s ... sutra.html

Other related material on my Blog: http://prajnacara.blogspot.tw/search/la ... naparamita

My PhD dissertation provides an interesting take on the whole text (even Lancaster and Fronsdal agree), through the notion of chiasmus:
ORSBORN, M B (= SHÌ Hùifēng 釋慧峰) (2012): Chiasmus in the Early Prajñāpāramitā: Literary Parallelism Connecting Criticism & Hermeneutics in an Early Mahāyāna Sūtra, PhD dissertation, University of Hong Kong.
It will appear here at the HKU Scholar Hub soon.
I'm presently working on it for publication as a monograph, but that will be a year or two at least.

Don't forget to do all the basics in Indian Buddhism and early Mahayana, as these are critical for really understanding this text.

All the best for your Prajñāpāramitā studies and practice!

~~ Huifeng
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Re: The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

Postby Gary » Thu Jul 05, 2012 11:39 am

Thanks to you both. Like you said Huifeng, the material is embedded out there, one just needs to know where to look. I appreciate you taking the time. The beginning of Mahayana history intrigues me quite a bit. I just picked up 'Indian Buddhism' by Warder, for an overview of early Buddhism up to that time. Thanks again-As I move along, I hope to be able to discuss any issues that might arise.

With Metta-

Gary
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Re: The Māhaprajñāparamitopadeśa

Postby indian summer » Fri Dec 06, 2013 5:45 am

I have trouble trying to find an English translation of the Māhaprajñāparamitopadeśa. I read some thing about three levels of metta that were set out in this great work of Nagarjuna. The three levels are supposed to be differentiated by the people who have attained different level of wisdom.

Any help would be much apprectiated.
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Re: The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

Postby Indrajala » Fri Dec 06, 2013 5:51 am

indian summer wrote:I have trouble trying to find an English translation of the Māhaprajñāparamitopadeśa. I read some thing about three levels of metta that were set out in this great work of Nagarjuna. The three levels are supposed to be differentiated by the people who have attained different level of wisdom.

Any help would be much apprectiated.


It has not been fully translated yet as far as I know.

It is also unclear to what extent it is Nāgārjuna's work as the translator Kumārajīva added to, modified and abbreviated much of the text. There is a fragment of the text in the Tangut language, which could be a translation from Sanskrit, but probably was a translation from the Chinese. There is no mention of the text in any other canon, which leads some to suggest it was written in China, perhaps by Kumārajīva himself, though this is by no means certain.
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Re: The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

Postby gad rgyangs » Fri Dec 06, 2013 6:31 am

Thoroughly tame your own mind.
This is (possibly) the teaching of Buddha.
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Re: The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

Postby indian summer » Fri Dec 06, 2013 6:40 am

Many thanks for the very quick replies.
No wonder they want us to cultivate prajnaparamita.........
Let me try and let you know...........
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Re: The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

Postby indian summer » Fri Dec 06, 2013 7:00 am

Not getting anywhere near.....
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Re: The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

Postby Huifeng » Fri Dec 06, 2013 12:43 pm

Also check out Ven. Dharmamitra Heng Shou's translations:
http://www.kalavinka.org/

~~ Huifeng
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Re: The Astasahasrika Prajnaparamita Sutra

Postby cdpatton » Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:24 pm

Indrajala wrote:
indian summer wrote:I have trouble trying to find an English translation of the Māhaprajñāparamitopadeśa. I read some thing about three levels of metta that were set out in this great work of Nagarjuna. The three levels are supposed to be differentiated by the people who have attained different level of wisdom.

Any help would be much apprectiated.


It has not been fully translated yet as far as I know.

It is also unclear to what extent it is Nāgārjuna's work as the translator Kumārajīva added to, modified and abbreviated much of the text. There is a fragment of the text in the Tangut language, which could be a translation from Sanskrit, but probably was a translation from the Chinese. There is no mention of the text in any other canon, which leads some to suggest it was written in China, perhaps by Kumārajīva himself, though this is by no means certain.


When you study it closely - especially the copious canonical quotations - it seems very unlikely to have been composed in China. Whoever composed it had access to materials never translated to Chinese. It is probably Central Asian, in my opinion.

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