New Film "The Apparition" BasedOn Tulpa Phenomena/Experiment

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New Film "The Apparition" BasedOn Tulpa Phenomena/Experiment

Postby asunthatneversets » Thu Aug 30, 2012 9:11 pm

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New film titled "The Apparition" which is out in theatres now is (loosely) based on Tulpa (thought-form) phenomena. Prior to filming, Warner Bros. hired paranormal investigator Joshua P. Warren to actually experiment with the notion and create a tulpa.

Summary of a radio show interview with Joshua:
"...paranormal investigator Joshua P. Warren finally revealed details about the groundbreaking experiment he was hired by Warner Brothers to conduct to 'create a ghost.' He was joined in the first hour by Todd Lincoln, writer/director of Warner Brothers' new horror movie, 'The Apparition'. Lincoln said his new film is inspired by experiments conducted in the 1970s by researchers who suggested that paranormal events happen because people believe in them. The group created a fictional back story for a man named Phillip and focused on manifesting him solely through the power of the mind, he explained. Strange things occurred which terrified the researchers and the experiment was halted, Lincoln added. In The Apparition a similar experiment summons an inhuman entity that gains its power from belief and fear, he noted.

Warren reported on his own attempt at creating a ghost using a lab setup, pointing out that "this actually worked." Components of the original Phillip experiment were combined with technology that amplified brain waves, he disclosed. The subject was asked to focus on a tiki doll and her thoughts were broadcast through equipment that magnified them into the equivalent of thousands of people thinking the same thing, Warren continued. Eventually, a huge harmonic-type field built up which damaged the equipment and ended the experiment, he recalled. According to Warren, seven days later he began to hear scratching sounds in the walls and saw a distorted human-shaped shadow walk down his staircase. In addition, objects were found inexplicably strewn about, the electrical system in Warren's building melted down, and other tenants claimed to have seen a shadowy being, he said. The implications to understand the nature of ghosts and the relationship between mind and environment are startling, Warren said."

Link to audio interview: http://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2012/08/17

Images from Warren's lab set-up:
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From Wikipedia (For those not familiar with Tulpas):
Tulpa (Wylie: sprul-pa; Sanskrit: निर्मित nirmita and निर्माण nirmāṇa; "to build" or "to construct") is an upaya concept in Tibetan Buddhism and Bon, discipline and teaching tool. The term was first rendered into English as 'Thoughtform' by Evans-Wentz (1954: p. 29):
"In as much as the mind creates the world of appearances, it can create any particular object desired. The process consists of giving palpable being to a visualization, in very much the same manner as an architect gives concrete expression in three dimensions to his abstract concepts after first having given them expression in the two-dimensions of his blue-print. The Tibetans call the One Mind's concretized visualization the Khorva (Hkhorva), equivalent to the Sanskrit Sangsara; that of an incarnate deity, like the Dalai or Tashi Lama, they call a Tul-ku (Sprul-sku), and that of a magician a Tul-pa (Sprul-pa), meaning a magically produced illusion or creation. A master of yoga can dissolve a Tul-pa as readily as he can create it; and his own illusory human body, or Tul-ku, he can likewise dissolve, and thus outwit Death. Sometimes, by means of this magic, one human form can be amalgamated with another, as in the instance of the wife of Marpa, guru of Milarepa, who ended her life by incorporating herself in the body of Marpa."

John Myrdhin Reynolds (1996: p. 350) in a note to his English translation of the life story of Garab Dorje defines a tulpa thus:
"A Nirmita (sprul-pa) is an emanation or a manifestation. A Buddha or other realized being is able to project many such Nirmitas simultaneously in an infinite variety of forms."

Thoughtform may be understood as a 'psychospiritual' complex of mind, energy or consciousness manifested either consciously or unconsciously, by a sentient being or in concert. In the Dzogchen view, accomplished thoughtform of the kye rim mode are sentient beings as they have a consciousness field or mindstream confluence in a dynamic of entrainment-secession and organization-entropy of emergent factors or from the mindstream intentionality of progenitor(s). Thoughtform may be benevolent, malevolent or of complex alignment and may be understood as a "spontaneous or intentional manifestation" or "emergence" (Tibetan: rang byung) of the 'Five Pure Lights' (Tibetan: 'od lnga). The Five Pure Lights may be understood as the "radiance" (Tibetan: 'od) or Clear Light (Tibetan: 'od gsal) substrate of 'mindstream' (Tibetan: sems rgyud) and the base or root 'dimensionality of all dharmas' (Sanskrit: dharmadhatu) of Nirvana and Samsara. The mindstream is an entwining or confluence of the 'Eight Consciousnesses' (Tibetan: rnam shes tshogs brgyad). Therefore, the Five Pure Lights are the 'root' (Tibetan: gzhi) of the Western scientific conceptions of matter and energy. From the Dzogchen perspective energy is nondual to 'spiritual energy' or 'vital force' (Tibetan: rlung). For the human species, defined in Traditional Tibetan medicine as the class of entities which holds a human la (Tibetan: bla), the Five Lung are direct homologues of the Five Pure Lights.

Professor H. H. Price, an Oxford philosopher and parapsychologist, held that once an idea has been formed, it "is no longer wholly under the control of the consciousness which gave it birth" but may operate independently on the minds of other people or on physical objects. It is contended that a meme is not a thoughtform, unless it is sentient. Though, memetic theory may be deemed an informative correlation to thoughtform phenomena.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulpa
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