Impure and pure illusory body

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Impure and pure illusory body

Postby DarwidHalim » Mon Jun 04, 2012 3:27 pm

Do you know what is the advantage to differentiate illusory body as pure and impure?

No matter how I look at the issue, they are actually same. I cannot figure out what is the real difference and real advantage in doing so.

In one text, seeing your reflection in the mirror, you praise and scold yourself. If you can see all are illusory including your body, it is said you achieve impure illusory body.

But if you change your body to your yidam or Buddha, and scold and praise yourself, and you see everything is illusory, that is called pure illusory body.

I don't see the difference and the advantage in dividing illusory body as pure and impure.
I am not here nor there.
I am not right nor wrong.
I do not exist neither non-exist.
I am not I nor non-I.
I am not in samsara nor nirvana.
To All Buddhas, I bow down for the teaching of emptiness. Thank You!
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Re: Impure and pure illusory body

Postby oldbob » Tue Jun 05, 2012 4:46 pm

DarwidHalim wrote:Do you know what is the advantage to differentiate illusory body as pure and impure?

No matter how I look at the issue, they are actually same. I cannot figure out what is the real difference and real advantage in doing so.

In one text, seeing your reflection in the mirror, you praise and scold yourself. If you can see all are illusory including your body, it is said you achieve impure illusory body.

But if you change your body to your yidam or Buddha, and scold and praise yourself, and you see everything is illusory, that is called pure illusory body.

I don't see the difference and the advantage in dividing illusory body as pure and impure.


Greetings Darwid and all and ALL,

I agree with you that there in no difference and no advantage in dividing the illusory body as pure and impure unless this addresses the subtle distinction between the Nirmanakaya aspect of the illusory body and the Sambogakaya aspect of the illusory body. Seeing your self, as your normal self, when you are talking to the mirror, as illusory, addresses your Nirmanakaya (physical) aspect, and all your associations with it will be overcome, if you do this practice.

Then, on a more subtle level, if you do the practice with seeing yourself as a yidam or Buddha (an idealized form), when you are talking to the mirror, then you are addressing, and overcoming your associations with yourself in your Sambogakaya (idealized aspect) form.

When you sit, and go into contemplation, after doing either of these two practices, then you get the benefit of addressing the Dharmakaya form of the illusory body, where there is nothing to be done, nor any distinctions at all; no addresser, no addressing and no addressed.

So perhaps a real question is, how do you talk to the mirror from the Dharmakaya? Maybe the Dharmakaya doesn't have anything to say? Remembering that the Nirmanakaya, Sambogakaya, and Dharmakaya are three aspects of one state of being, then you can relax about pure and impure.

Perhaps you can try the practice each way, and you can see if there is a difference.

A friend told me that In the Dzogchen Rushen, there is a practice where you talk to yourself in the mirror until you are absolutely exhausted, just saying whatever comes to mind. Then, when you are completely exhausted you lie on your back, on the floor, completely relaxed, and observe what arises in your continuum. It would be best to talk to a Dzogchen master, about this practice, before doing it. The Rushens have many practices of which this is just one: meaning that you should not think of this practice as something which you do just by itself. Also, please note that sometimes the texts might leave some things out.

The illusory body practice is normally taught as part of the 6 Yogas of Naropa or Niguma. This used to be secret but now is widely published.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_ ... +of+naropa

Perhaps you are reading a text from one of these books.

It would be best if you can receive these teachings from an accomplished Master, who holds a lineal transmission of these practices.

http://ddcv.com/

The second retreat listed would be an example of what I am talking about. This is easy Dharma: excellent Teacher, friendly sangha, beautiful venue, beautiful camping sites and B&Bs and a nice time to visit Vermont.

For me, the dark retreat is the easiest way to have a sense of the illusory body.

May this be of use to someone.

Long life to the Masters, with good health and success in all things!

ob
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