...

Moderator: Tibetan Buddhism moderators

...

Postby Londoner » Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:51 pm

My father passed away recently (he was British). We will have the funeral soon. During his life he had a great interest in Tibetan Buddhism which he always read extensively about. He was not Christian and never actually officially converted to Buddhism. He will get cremated soon and at his funeral my sister wants some subtle Buddhist element to it in the way of a possession he could be cremated with. He will of course not have a traditional Buddhist funeral, a western secular (non religious) one. Don't mean to sound stupid but my sister wanted to include a small (wooden) Buddha statue for his cremation. I thought this might be a bad idea as burning a small Buddha statue might seem sacrilege or even 'bad luck' to a Tibetan Buddhist. He was not superstitious or anything but think he would not have wanted to do that if it is considered 'bad' in Tibetan religious beliefs.

I want to do the right thing so I would be most grateful if someone, (preferably a Tibetan Buddhist), could let me know if this is deemed ok to do at a funeral? I think Tibetan Buddhists just cremate the body by itself with no possessions accompanying it? I would be most grateful if somebody, (a Tibetan Buddhist?), could please let me know what in a Tibetan Buddhist cremation or for a western man would be considered ok to bring as possessions that will accompany his cremation that would symbolise Tibetan Buddhism.

Thank you very much
Londoner
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:25 pm

Re: ...

Postby mint » Thu Apr 26, 2012 4:21 pm

Can't help with what you need, but just wanted to offer you my condolences for your loss.
User avatar
mint
 
Posts: 436
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 6:45 pm

Re: ...

Postby Knotty Veneer » Thu Apr 26, 2012 4:37 pm

If you are in the UK I suggest you contact these guys: http://www.samyeling.org

I'm sure they will be able to give you the advice you need. They frequently carry out funerals and memorial services at Samye Ling monastery and it's associated centres.
You cannot polish a turd - however a pleasing effect can be attained by rolling one in glitter.
Knotty Veneer
 
Posts: 340
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:50 pm

Re: ...

Postby ngodrup » Thu Apr 26, 2012 4:56 pm

There are a couple of things that could be done.

1) from whatever money he had on hand, it need not be a large sum,
prayers can be recited in his name at a place like Samye Ling.

2) A small portion of the ashes -- a tablespoon or so -- can be added
to the plaster or hydrostone used in making tsa-tsas (which are small statues
representing various Buddhas like Vajrasattva). Tsa-Tsas can be placed in shrines
or even respecfully consigned to the environment, such as sea, lakes, rivers.

3) There are small cremains vases in the shape of a traditional stupa. These can
be placed anywhere where you show respect-- they do not have to be in temples--
they can be placed on a shelf in a shelf in a home.

Any of these things can be done privately, will no fanfare.
ngodrup
 
Posts: 477
Joined: Wed Dec 15, 2010 6:58 pm

Re: ...

Postby Jikan » Thu Apr 26, 2012 4:57 pm

Jikan
Site Admin
 
Posts: 4288
Joined: Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:04 pm

Re: ...

Postby Tssrt » Thu Apr 26, 2012 5:24 pm

If your father had great interest in tibetan buddhism, he must have made a connection to Guru Rinpoche, who brought Buddhism to Tibet.

From the Terma by Karma Lingpa about the Guru Rinpoche Mantra:

You may also write this mantra out in gold ink on dark blue paper and wear it as an
amulet. When you die, if this amulet is burned with your corpse, rainbows will be
seen and your consciousness will be transferred to the realms of Supreme Bliss.


The Termatext can be found here: http://www.lotsawahouse.org/topics/ngag ... uru-mantra

The Mantra: http://budda.net.pl/images/pad%20mantra.JPG

It is usual to burn objects of blessings like this with the corpse in tibetan tradition.
Tssrt
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 6:34 pm

Re: ...

Postby Paul » Thu Apr 26, 2012 5:35 pm

Knotty Veneer wrote:If you are in the UK I suggest you contact these guys: http://www.samyeling.org

I'm sure they will be able to give you the advice you need. They frequently carry out funerals and memorial services at Samye Ling monastery and it's associated centres.


They can put his ashes in the stupa there - it's quite amazing.
Image

"Do not block your six senses; delight in them with joy and ease.
All that you take pleasure in will strengthen the awakened state.
With such a confidence, empowered by the regal state of natural mind,
The training now is simply this: lets your six senses be at ease and free." - Princess Parani
User avatar
Paul
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2010 8:12 pm

Re: ...

Postby Kelwin » Thu Apr 26, 2012 6:52 pm

Londoner wrote:My father passed away recently (he was British). We will have the funeral soon. During his life he had a great interest in Tibetan Buddhism which he always read extensively about. He was not Christian and never actually officially converted to Buddhism. He will get cremated soon and at his funeral my sister wants some subtle Buddhist element to it in the way of a possession he could be cremated with. He will of course not have a traditional Buddhist funeral, a western secular (non religious) one. Don't mean to sound stupid but my sister wanted to include a small (wooden) Buddha statue for his cremation. I thought this might be a bad idea as burning a small Buddha statue might seem sacrilege or even 'bad luck' to a Tibetan Buddhist. He was not superstitious or anything but think he would not have wanted to do that if it is considered 'bad' in Tibetan religious beliefs.

I want to do the right thing so I would be most grateful if someone, (preferably a Tibetan Buddhist), could let me know if this is deemed ok to do at a funeral? I think Tibetan Buddhists just cremate the body by itself with no possessions accompanying it? I would be most grateful if somebody, (a Tibetan Buddhist?), could please let me know what in a Tibetan Buddhist cremation or for a western man would be considered ok to bring as possessions that will accompany his cremation that would symbolise Tibetan Buddhism.

Thank you very much


First of all, my condolences to you and your sister. Second, I have to say I'm a bit touched by the thought to include a Buddha, and then also the consideration towards Buddhism, whether this is appropriate. That is honestly beautiful.

Sending a Buddha with your father is definitely a good idea. After all, the motivation here is to include something positive (not to 'destroy' a Buddha, but to have your father take it with him). To connect your passed father to enlightenment / oneness with the universe / God / or however you prefer to relate to this. Cremating a Buddha with your father is certainly not disrespectful or bad luck. And with the very positive motivation you and your sister have in doing this, nothing could actually be considered a bad thing in Buddhism.

Find a nice wooden Buddha statue, make some good wishes for your father in any way that seem appropriate to you, and send him of in the most loving way you can. May he be well, wherever he goes.

Wishing you and you family all the strength and love you need in these tough times,
Maarten
User avatar
Kelwin
 
Posts: 99
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2011 1:52 pm

Re: ...

Postby Londoner » Fri Apr 27, 2012 3:04 am

Thank you for your replies. Having read them and ascertained that burning a small buddha statue would not be considered a bad thing to do I think we will go with this as was my sisters first idea anyway. Don't think my family would want any too elaborate like taking his ashes to the temple (My mum wanted them to be scattered where she will be) - unfortunatley she may pass soon too - not trying to write a big sob story).

Thank you
Londoner
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:25 pm


Return to Tibetan Buddhism

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: namoh, Tourbillon and 13 guests

>