Setting up Shrine for Water Dragon Losar 2139

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Setting up Shrine for Water Dragon Losar 2139

Postby phantom59 » Tue Feb 21, 2012 4:34 pm

As you probably know, the Tibetan New Year Losar is tomorrow. On February 22, 2012 Tibetans will celebrate the start of the year 2139, a male water dragon year in the Tibetan calendar.

'In Tibetan homes, the Losar altar serves as a prominent, central symbol of a wish to cultivate a generous heart, and to invoke beautiful blessings into the lives of our family, friends and community for the New Year.

One thing that is important for you to know is that there are no set rules or instructions on how to set up the Losar shrine, and that you do not need any special objects to do it “right.”If you look at the pictures, you will see a large difference in styles and objects on the altars. The more elaborate ones tend to be created at dharma centers or monasteries.
All you really need is a sincere motivation to cultivate generosity.'

'Objects Tibetans Commonly Add to a Losar Altar

Image

A chemar bo is an open, decorated box divided down the middle. (See the carved wooden box near the bottom left of the image above, or the red painted one at the top of this blog post.) Half is traditionally filled with chemar, which is made of roasted barley flour (tsampa), sugar and butter. The other half is filled with roasted barley seeds or roasted wheat. Guests, on entering your home at Losar, are invited to take a pinch of the chemar, after which they offer a blessing and good luck wish while throwing the chemar in the air with three waves of their hands and then taking a tiny nibble. If you don’t have a chemar bo, a bowl is just fine.

Butter sculptures are sometimes placed in the chemar bo or on the altar. These are usually beautifully colored, intricate designs and representations of spiritual elements made from butter, usually made by monks or nuns. Sometimes, what looks like butter sculptures, like the colorful objects rising out of the chemar bo above, can be decorated carvings or painting on wood.

Sheep’s head (luggo): Most likely related to invoking health and abundance for nomadic herds, the sheep’s head can be a butter sculpture, or could be clay, or porcelain, or ceramic. It often has the traditional Tibetan sun and moon symbols called nyimadawa.

Food and drink offerings
The quintessential food offering of Losar is the popular New Year deep-fried cookies called khapsay. On the shrine, you will often find stacks or piles of the various styles of khapsay decorated with strings of dried dri (female yak) cheese (chu gong) and/or with colorfully wrapped candies. (See the very tall stack of khapsay in the image below. We will write more about all the kinds of khapsay in a later blog post.)

Tibetans tend to add lots of cookies, candies, fresh fruit, and dried fruit, the more visually pleasing and fresh the better.
Wine or chang, a very popular barley or rice beer often brewed at home for Losar.
In Tibet, families will commonly offer butter (from the female yak, the dri), salt and a brick of tea. In Tibet, tea traditionally comes in brick form

Flowers
In Tibet, it is very popular to put a brick of tho (pronounced somewhat like “too” in English) on the shrine. Made of butter, dried cheese and sugar, and referred to as kharsum ngarsum, the tho is most likely intended to both represent and invoke abundance for the yak herds that produce the food staples of butter and cheese. You can see the tho in the image below near the bottom left. The sign that looks like a swastika on the tho is actually an ancient Buddhist symbol.

'Basic elements of a Tibetan Buddhist altar:
Statue of the Buddha Shakyamuni to represent the Buddha. You may also have other important Buddhist figures, like Tara, Manjushri, or Avalokiteshvara. If you don’t have a statue, it is fine to have a photo or a thangkha with an image of the Buddha.

Buddhist scripture, to represent the speech of the Buddha. This can be Tibetan or Sanskrit or a scripture in your own language.

A stupa, to represent the Buddha’s mind. (A photo is fine.)

The first three elements the statue of Buddha, scripture and the stupa form the spiritual heart of your altar and need to be located centrally and prominently.

Besides these, you will often find:
A photo of your spiritual teacher(s). For Tibetans this almost always will be an image of His Holiness the Dalai Lama.
A thangka, which is a Tibetan silk painting with embroidery, usually portraying the Buddha Shakaymuni, or other Buddhist deities or scenes.

Seven offering bowls filled with water. Some people may have multiple sets of these seven offering bowls and fill the other sets with rice or attractive foods, but the basic offering is seven bowls of water. Of course these can be simple bowls. (We will dedicate a blog post to offering bowls soon, as they are rich in meaning.)

Butter lamps or candles (Collectively known as chomay — which means, roughly, dharma fire or light). You might have only one or as many as you want.

Droma dresil — a sweetened rice dish eaten first thing in the morning on the first day of Losar. Before eating, the family will offer a bowl on the shrine. (Recipe for this in Tibetan Home Cooking.)

http://www.yowangdu.com/tibetan-buddhis ... altar.html

Tea — either Tibetan butter tea (po cha) or Indian-style sweet tea (chai). A cup of tea is offered at the shrine before your first drink on Losar morning. See recipe here

Dried stalks of buckwheat (chi dro). A symbol of abundance for a staple Tibetan crop. Can also be winter wheat. (See the chi dro in the chemar bo of the Gyuto Dharma Center shrine two images above.)

Lo phu — sprouted wheat grass from winter wheat, or whatever grassy sprouts you like. “Lo phu” has a connotation of the “first thing,” symbolizing freshness and newness. (See in images just above and in the Gyuto Dharma Center image.)
Incense — normally on Losar morning, Tibetans will burn some incense at the altar.

Khata — white blessing scarfs. In Tibetan communities in exile, these blessing scarves have become a common part of Losar shrines, draped over parts of the shrine, or wrapped around any of the objects above. Interestingly, in Tibet itself khatas are only traditionally used on the spiritually related parts of the shrine, not draped on the khapsay, or tied around a bottle of wine. This seems to be a new tradition in exile.

Your Insider’s Guide to Losar Eating — Part 2
http://www.yowangdu.com/tibetan-food/losar-2.html
Your Insider’s Guide to Losar Eating — Part 1
http://www.yowangdu.com/tibetan-food/losar-1.html
Image
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Re: Setting up Shrine for Water Dragon Losar 2139

Postby phantom59 » Tue Feb 21, 2012 4:59 pm

Losar Celebrations in the days of old Tibet

For the monasteries in old Tibet, the celebrations for the Losar begin on the twenty-ninth day of the twelfth month. That is the day before the Tibetan New Year’s Eve. On that day the monasteries do a protector deities’ puja (a special kind of ritual) and begin preparations for the Losar celebrations.The custom that day is to make a special noodle called guthuk. It is made of nine different ingredients including dried cheese and various grains. Also, dough balls are given out with various ingredients hidden in them such as chilies, salt, wool, rice and coal. The ingredients one finds hidden in one’s dough ball are supposed to be a lighthearted comment on one’s character. If a person finds chilies in their dough, it means they are talkative. If white-colored ingredients like salt, wool or rice are inside the dough it is considered a good sign. If a person finds coal in the dough it has much the same meaning as finding coal in one’s Christmas stocking; it means you have a “black heart”.

The last day of the year is a time to clean and prepare for the approaching New Year. In Lhasa, the first day of the new year is officially called “Lama Losar”. In the early dawn of this day, the monks of Namgyal Monastery offer a sacrificial cake (Tse- tor) on the Potala palace to the supreme hierarchy of Dharma protectors, the glorious goddess Palden Lhamo. Led by His Holiness the Dalai Lama, the abbots of three great monasteries, lamas, reincarnated monks, government officials and dignitaries join the ceremony and offer their contemplative prayers, while the monks of Namgyal Monastery recite the invocation of Palden Lhamo. After the completion of this ceremony, all assemble in the hall called Excellence of Samsara and Nirvana for a formal greeting ceremony. Seated on his or her respective cushions, everyone exchanges the traditional greeting, “Tashi delek”.

In order to wish His Holiness the Dalai Lama good luck for the coming year, consecrated long-life pills (tse-ril) made out of roasted barley dough are offered to him by the representatives of the three great monasteries, the two Tantric Colleges, etc. Then entertainers (garma) perform a dance of good wishes. And two senior monks stage a debate on Buddhist philosophy, and conclude their debate with an auspicious recitation composed especially for the event, in which the whole spectrum of Buddhist teaching is first briefly reviewed. A request is made to His Holiness the Dalai Lama and to all holders of the doctrine to remain for a long time amongst beings in samsarain order to serve them through their enlightened activities. The official ceremony of the day then concludes with a ceremonial farewell to the His Holiness, who then retires to his palace.

The second day of Losar is called King’s Losar (Gyalpo Losar), as officially the day is reserved for a secular gathering in the hall of Excellence of Samsara and Nirvana. His Holiness and his government exchange greetings with both monastic and lay dignitaries, such as representatives of China, India, Bhutan, Nepal, Mongolia and other foreign visitors.

Then from the third day onwards, the people and monks begin to celebrate and enjoy the festive season. In Tibet before the Chinese came, Losar was celebrated for fifteen days or more. In India today Losar is celebrated for three days.

http://www.tibetanbuddhistlex.org/17.html
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Re: Setting up Shrine for Water Dragon Losar 2139

Postby conebeckham » Tue Feb 21, 2012 5:10 pm

That's quite a torma in the first pic, for someone to have in their home!
:smile:

Great stuff, though. We do Chemar, Desi, Khapsey, etc. at our house. But those examples put us to shame!
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Re: Setting up Shrine for Water Dragon Losar 2139

Postby Sherab Dorje » Tue Feb 21, 2012 5:30 pm

That's a serious pile of cookies happening there! Wouldn't want to bump the table by mistake! :smile:
"When one is not in accord with the true view
Meditation and conduct become delusion,
One will not attain the real result
One will be like a blind man who has no eyes."
Naropa - Summary of the View from The Eight Doha Treasures
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Re: Setting up Shrine for Water Dragon Losar 2139

Postby conebeckham » Tue Feb 21, 2012 5:34 pm

Also, we do Gu Tuk....every year. Last night I got a piece of "rock salt" in my dumpling.....as if I needed any reminding of my lazy nature.
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