HHDL's “retirement” shows how much Tibet still needs him

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HHDL's “retirement” shows how much Tibet still needs him

Postby Mr. G » Sun Jan 09, 2011 6:37 am

Enthroned in a maroon and saffron pavilion, the 14th Dalai Lama chuckled often as he preached to the football stadium, though his text was not taken from the jolly slogan behind him: “Play soccer for world peace”. Ringed by snowcapped Himalayan peaks in Gangtok, capital of the Indian state of Sikkim, which borders Tibet, tens of thousands basked in midwinter sunshine—local Sikkimese of Nepali and ethnic-Tibetan descent, visitors and, of course, Tibetan exiles. The Dalai Lama may exaggerate a bit when he says that 99% of Tibetans trust him. But not by much. So his recent talk of “retirement” has unnerved many.

In November he said he was seriously thinking of retiring. An election in 2001 for his government-in-exile had already ended the 400-year tradition of Dalai Lamas as both spiritual and political leaders. After an election in March this year, he would discuss with the new parliament when to give up his remaining “temporal” role. He expected to retire in the “next few months”.

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Re: HHDL's “retirement” shows how much Tibet still needs him

Postby Blue Garuda » Sun Jan 09, 2011 11:24 pm

The Tibetan Government in Exile - is it necessary? There is an Indian Government already.

Each Tibetan School has its head, in the case of the Gelugpa it is the Ganden Tripa - is a Dalai Lama necessary?

It would be interesting to experience a period without a Dalai Lama and see what transpires.

I predict that if they had no Dalai Lama, they would need to invent one in order to secure a focus for a national and spiritual identity and cohesion.
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Re: HHDL's “retirement” shows how much Tibet still needs him

Postby heart » Mon Jan 10, 2011 6:12 am

Yeshe wrote:The Tibetan Government in Exile - is it necessary? There is an Indian Government already.

Each Tibetan School has its head, in the case of the Gelugpa it is the Ganden Tripa - is a Dalai Lama necessary?

It would be interesting to experience a period without a Dalai Lama and see what transpires.

I predict that if they had no Dalai Lama, they would need to invent one in order to secure a focus for a national and spiritual identity and cohesion.


I think you don't understand the position of the Dalai Lama in the hearts of the Tibetan people. His incarnation been the equivalent of a king for the Tibetans and this is a position he been wanting to be disassociated with since the sixties. The Dalai Lama have always wanted democracy for Tibet, but his people are not agreeing. The Tibetan Government in Exile is only the normal survival efforts of a people in exile, it been done by other people many times. Is your opinion that the Tibetans should resign themselves to never returning to Tibet, or what?

/magnus
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Re: HHDL's “retirement” shows how much Tibet still needs him

Postby Blue Garuda » Mon Jan 10, 2011 10:52 am

heart wrote:
Yeshe wrote:The Tibetan Government in Exile - is it necessary? There is an Indian Government already.

Each Tibetan School has its head, in the case of the Gelugpa it is the Ganden Tripa - is a Dalai Lama necessary?

It would be interesting to experience a period without a Dalai Lama and see what transpires.

I predict that if they had no Dalai Lama, they would need to invent one in order to secure a focus for a national and spiritual identity and cohesion.


I think you don't understand the position of the Dalai Lama in the hearts of the Tibetan people. His incarnation been the equivalent of a king for the Tibetans and this is a position he been wanting to be disassociated with since the sixties. The Dalai Lama have always wanted democracy for Tibet, but his people are not agreeing. The Tibetan Government in Exile is only the normal survival efforts of a people in exile, it been done by other people many times. Is your opinion that the Tibetans should resign themselves to never returning to Tibet, or what?

/magnus


Um............that's why I wrote that ''if they had no Dalai Lama, they would need to invent one in order to secure a focus for a national and spiritual identity and cohesion''. That seems entirely consistent with what you wrote.

I speak face to face with at least one Tibetan on a weekly basis, and I've been to India a dozen or so times, but my understanding may well be deficient, apologies for that. ;)

Personally, I think that the longer the Tibetans are in India, the less likely it is that they will have a desire to return home. Tibetans in various parts of India who have established monastic homes and families in the villages there may not have the desire to uproot from what is the only home known to the younger Tibetans.

On a more serious note, we also have to consider exactly what 'snapshot' of Tibetan history the exiled Tibetans may wish to return to - one which was best for them, best for all ethnic Tibetans, or best for the whole population of Tibet. A desire to return to Tibet is something they must review in the light of the current situation and the future, rather than the past.

There may be some desire for democracy but as it stands the TGIE follows the instructions of HHDL, so maybe they need to be more adventurous with the current organisation, living within the democracy of India, before considering how that may be applied within Tibet.

The position of HHDL in the hearts of the 'Tibetan people' is interesting to consider in that light. What position does a Dalai Lama hold in the hearts of the growing Han population, for example? And what of the Tibetans who are Moslem etc. ? They must also be considered. Here is a snapshot of Tibet, albeit from the late 1990's:
http://www.unescap.org/esid/psis/popula ... /tibet.htm

I'm not sure that the existence of a King precludes democracy. Remember, the UK has such an arrangement, where currently the Queen is still the religious leader, but effectively unable to exercise any power as political monarch independent of the elected government. Somehow I can't see the Chinese even permitting a Dalai Lama in Tibet with no political role, but I can't claim any expertise in Chinese politics.

maitri

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Re: HHDL's “retirement” shows how much Tibet still needs him

Postby Luke » Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:10 pm

Yeshe wrote:The position of HHDL in the hearts of the 'Tibetan people' is interesting to consider in that light. What position does a Dalai Lama hold in the hearts of the growing Han population, for example? And what of the Tibetans who are Moslem etc. ? They must also be considered.

It's true that there are many ethnic groups now living in Tibet, due to the efforts of the Chinese government, but this doesn't mean that ethnic Tibetans have any less of a right to autonomy or any less of a right to practice their religion and culture freely. Ethnic Tibetans should be proud of being Tibetan and continue the struggle to preserve their culture.

What do other ethnic groups in Tibet think of the Dalai Lama? I really don't know, but they should like him because he always encourages young Tibetans to treat the Han Chinese as friends, and His Holiness urges people to be kind to all living creatures and to protect the environment.

Few world leaders care more about the people of the world as a whole than His Holiness does. The Chinese should use the opportunity to create a peaceful solution in Tibet with His Holiness while they still have it. Future leaders of the ethnic Tibetans may not be so kind and peaceful.
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Re: HHDL's “retirement” shows how much Tibet still needs him

Postby Blue Garuda » Mon Jan 10, 2011 5:37 pm

Luke wrote:
Yeshe wrote:The position of HHDL in the hearts of the 'Tibetan people' is interesting to consider in that light. What position does a Dalai Lama hold in the hearts of the growing Han population, for example? And what of the Tibetans who are Moslem etc. ? They must also be considered.

It's true that there are many ethnic groups now living in Tibet, due to the efforts of the Chinese government, but this doesn't mean that ethnic Tibetans have any less of a right to autonomy or any less of a right to practice their religion and culture freely. Ethnic Tibetans should be proud of being Tibetan and continue the struggle to preserve their culture.

What do other ethnic groups in Tibet think of the Dalai Lama? I really don't know, but they should like him because he always encourages young Tibetans to treat the Han Chinese as friends, and His Holiness urges people to be kind to all living creatures and to protect the environment.

Few world leaders care more about the people of the world as a whole than His Holiness does. The Chinese should use the opportunity to create a peaceful solution in Tibet with His Holiness while they still have it. Future leaders of the ethnic Tibetans may not be so kind and peaceful.


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