The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

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The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Ngawang Drolma » Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:29 pm

Hi all,

I think that to note the differences between religions is respectful. Different religions and even various traditions within the same religion may vary greatly. So I don't think it's skillful to say it's all the same.

But His Holiness the Dalai Lama often talks about the value of being respectful towards other faiths. And he sometimes points out some common ground that can be found among world religions such as teachings about the value compassion. I've given a small excerpt from "Glimpse of Reality" below.

What do you think? Do you have a particular mindset or approach when it comes to other faiths?

Best,
Laura


The Buddhist View toward Other Religions
Singapore August 10, 1988

Revised excerpt from
Berzin, Alexander and Chodron, Thubten. Glimpse of Reality.
Singapore: Amitabha Buddhist Centre, 1999.

Question: How does Buddhism view the existence of other religions?

Answer: Because not everyone has the same inclinations and interests, Buddha taught various methods to different people. Citing this example, His Holiness the Dalai Lama has said that it is wonderful that so many different religions exist in the world. Just as one food will not appeal to everybody, one religion or one set of beliefs will not satisfy everyone's needs. Therefore, it is extremely beneficial that a variety of different religions is available from which to choose. He welcomes and rejoices at this.

Nowadays, there is a growing dialogue, based on mutual respect, between Buddhist masters and leaders of other religions. The Dalai Lama, for example, meets the Pope frequently. In Assisi, Italy, in October 1986, the Pope invited the leaders of all the world religions to a large assembly. About one hundred and fifty representatives were there. The Dalai Lama was seated next to the Pope and was given the honor of making the first speech. At the conference, the spiritual leaders discussed topics that are common in all religions, such as morality, love and compassion. People were very encouraged by the cooperation, harmony and mutual respect that the various religious leaders felt for each other.

Of course, if we discuss metaphysics and theology, there are differences. There is no way to get around the differences. However, that does not mean that we need to argue with the attitude of "My daddy is stronger than your daddy." That is very childish. It is more beneficial to look at the things that are in common. All the world religions are seeking to improve the situation of humanity and to make life better by teaching people to follow ethical behavior. They all teach people not to become totally caught up in the material side of life, but at least to strike a balance between seeking material progress and spiritual progress.

It is very helpful if all religions work together to improve the situation of the world. We need not only material progress, but spiritual progress as well. If we only emphasize the material aspect of life, then to make a better bomb to kill everyone would be a desirable goal. If, on the other hand, we think in a humanistic or spiritual way, we are aware of the fear and other problems that come from the further buildup of weapons of mass destruction. If we only develop spiritually and do not take care of the material side then people go hungry, and that is not very good either. We need a balance.

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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Eternal Spirit » Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:43 pm

Dear Ngawang Drolma,

All religions are the manifestion of the Eternal Spirit.

When the mind of a human being penetrates the realm of the Eternal Spirit, its conscience will become clear and hiri-ottappa will naturally be unveiled.

All religions share morality or hiri-ottappa as their foundation.

"Bhikkhus, these two bright principles protect the world. What are the two?

Shame (hiri) and fear of wrongdoing (ottappa).

Lokapala Sutta


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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby David N. Snyder » Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:56 pm

From the 14 Rock Edicts of Ashoka:

Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, honors both ascetics and the householders of all religions, and he honors them with gifts and honors of various kinds.22 But Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, does not value gifts and honors as much as he values this — that there should be growth in the essentials of all religions.23 Growth in essentials can be done in different ways, but all of them have as their root restraint in speech, that is, not praising one's own religion, or condemning the religion of others without good cause. And if there is cause for criticism, it should be done in a mild way. But it is better to honor other religions for this reason. By so doing, one's own religion benefits, and so do other religions, while doing otherwise harms one's own religion and the religions of others. Whoever praises his own religion, due to excessive devotion, and condemns others with the thought "Let me glorify my own religion," only harms his own religion. Therefore contact (between religions) is good.24 One should listen to and respect the doctrines professed by others. Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, desires that all should be well-learned in the good doctrines of other religions.

Those who are content with their own religion should be told this: Beloved-of-the-Gods, King Piyadasi, does not value gifts and honors as much as he values that there should be growth in the essentials of all religions. And to this end many are working — Dhamma Mahamatras, Mahamatras in charge of the women's quarters, officers in charge of outlying areas, and other such officers. And the fruit of this is that one's own religion grows and the Dhamma is illuminated also.


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... el386.html

This part is especially great:

" not praising one's own religion, or condemning the religion of others without good cause. And if there is cause for criticism, it should be done in a mild way. But it is better to honor other religions for this reason. By so doing, one's own religion benefits, and so do other religions, while doing otherwise harms one's own religion and the religions of others. Whoever praises his own religion, due to excessive devotion, and condemns others with the thought "Let me glorify my own religion," only harms his own religion."
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Ngawang Drolma » Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:59 pm

Eternal Spirit wrote:Dear Ngawang Drolma,

All religions are the manifestion of the Eternal Spirit.

When the mind of a human being penetrates the realm of the Eternal Spirit, its conscience will become clear and hiri-ottappa will naturally be unveiled.

All religions share morality or hiri-ottappa as their foundation.

"Bhikkhus, these two bright principles protect the world. What are the two?

Shame (hiri) and fear of wrongdoing (ottappa).

Lokapala Sutta


Image


Dear Eternal Spirit,

Thank you for that sutta, it's very fitting. But what's not fitting in is your comment about a spirit that's eternal, as it's contrary to the Buddha's teachings on anicca and anatta.

Best,
Laura

:namaste:
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Ngawang Drolma » Mon Jun 01, 2009 11:14 pm

TheDhamma, that's very nice, thanks! :smile:

Best,
Laura
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby sraddha » Tue Jun 02, 2009 12:12 am

This is an excellent essay which I have found to be true:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... tml#essay4

Against this background, we can now see how the Buddha-Dhamma is related to other religions.

As stated earlier, the Buddhist way to Nibbana is the Noble Eightfold Path. The question then arises as to whether arahantship — perfect holiness — or Nibbana is possible outside this path. The Buddha's answer to Subhadda's question, just before he passed away, clarifies our problem: "In whatever teaching, O Subhadda, there exists the Noble Eightfold Path, there is the first saint (sotapanna), there is the second saint (sakadagami), there is the third saint (anagami), there is the fourth saint (arahant). An arahant is a perfect saint. Elsewhere there are mere semblances of saints." As the Noble Eightfold Path is found only in Buddhism, in the Buddha's own words "the other teachings are empty of true saints."

They therefore err who say that all spiritual paths lead to the same summit and that the view from the top is identical for all. The reason is simple: the Buddha saw the true nature of things clearly and completely with his own independent supramundane insight — his perfect enlightenment — and so his teaching is an exact reflection of reality, while other religious teachers had only an imperfect view of reality, with eyes dimmed by various forms and degrees of ignorance (avijja).

This, however, does not imply that Buddhism is intolerant of other religions. Neither the Buddha nor his followers ever imposed his system of thought or his way of life on anyone who would not accept it of his or her own volition. Acceptance was a purely voluntary matter. Even if accepted, how much of it one should practice is one's own responsibility. But regardless of one's personal inclinations, the universal moral laws operate objectively — action being followed by due reaction, deeds by their fruits. The Buddha merely reveals the laws of life, and the more faithfully we follow them, the better it is for us, for then we act according to the Dhamma.


Underlining and bolding is mine. :anjali:
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby retrofuturist » Tue Jun 02, 2009 2:31 am

Greetings Sraddha,

Nice quote and one I agree with, but then I'm a Theravada practitioner.

I wonder what the "classical" Vajrayana perspective is with regards to other religions.

Metta,
Retro. :)
Live in concord, with mutual appreciation, without disputing, blending like milk and water, viewing each other with kindly eyes

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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Ngawang Drolma » Tue Jun 02, 2009 2:45 am

Hi Retro,

I feel that we can rely on His Holiness the Dalai Lama for a Vajrayana perspective. By many it's considered that he is the head of all four schools. Some people don't feel that way, but it's a common assertion.

Best,
Laura
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby retrofuturist » Tue Jun 02, 2009 4:08 am

Greetings Ngawang Drolma,

Ngawang Drolma wrote:I feel that we can rely on His Holiness the Dalai Lama for a Vajrayana perspective.

(Apologies if it's an inauspicious subject but...) What will you do after he dies? The Vajrayana tradition will outlive him... then who will be relied on for a definitive perspective? If you're relying on a single source and that source is a person, then isn't the definitive position going to keep changing with each encumbent (a little like the changing of the popes in the Vatican)?

Metta,
Retro. :)
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Ngawang Drolma » Tue Jun 02, 2009 5:30 am

Hi Retro,

The most likely scenario is that someone will take over his duties. Or at least that's what I've heard. For many Tibetan Buddhists the subject of his passing has been of concern because he has said that he won't take rebirth. It's okay to talk about, people do express concerns. You might have heard that the Panchen Lama has been under house arrest since he was a small boy. The primary role of the Dalai Lamas has been temporal, but of course he's also viewed by many as a spiritual master.

The Dalai Lama promotes a philosophy which engages all four schools of Tibetan Buddhism. Here's a little bit of information about the Rime movement:

The movement's name is derived from two Tibetan words: Ris (division, border) and Med (refutation), which combined expresses the idea of openness to other buddhist traditions, as opposed to sectarianism. The Rimé movement therefore is often mistaken as trying to unite the various sects through their similarities, which was not the case. Rather, Rimé was designed to recognize the differences between traditions and appreciate them, while also establishing a dialogue which would create common ground. It is considered important that variety be preserved, and therefore Rimé teachers are generally quite careful to emphasize differences in thought, giving students many options as to how to proceed in their spiritual training. Students who associate with Rimé do not leave their old traditions, but rather continue practicing as their regular tradition would ascribe. Two of the founding voices of Rimé were Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo and Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye, both from different schools. Thaye was from the Nyingma and Kagyu traditions, while Wangpo had been raised within the Sakya order. At the time, Tibetan schools of thought had become very isolated, and both Wangpo and Thaye were instrumental in re-initiating dialogue between the sects. Rimé was, to some extent, the re-establishment of a rule or principle that had always been present in Tibetan Buddhism, but that had been de-emphasized or forgotten. That is: to ignorantly criticize other traditions was wrong, and that misunderstandings due to ignorance should be immediately alleviated. Rimé is not a spiritual lineage, but rather a philosophical movement which seeks to establish, preserve, and cultivate dialogue between varying traditions, appreciating their differences and emphasizing the need for variety. It was initially created to counteract the growing suspicion and tension building between the different traditions, which at the time had, in many places, gone so far as to forbid studying one another's scriptures. Rimé became thereafter an integral part of the Tibetan tradition, and continues to be an important school of philosophy in Tibetan Buddhism. Jamyang Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö, Khunu Lama Tenzin Gyaltsen and Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche are recent Rimé masters, known for their public influence and as being advisers and teachers to the 14th Dalai Lama. Other modern adherents include the late 16th Karmapa and Dudjom Rinpoche, both of whom gave extensive teachings from the works of Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro, as well as Akong Rinpoche who, with the late Chogyam Trungpa helped establish Tibetan Buddhism in Britain.
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Dazzle » Tue Jun 02, 2009 7:18 am

.

.

HH Dalai Lama is head of the Gelug school and was political head of Tibet. However he is not the head of the Nyingma, Kagyu and Sakya schools. Because he is such a public figure and revered my many people worldwide, it is often assumed that he is the head of Tibetan Buddhism. His teachings and position are of course acknowledged and greatly respected by all the schools and his teachings considered to be representative of Tibetan Buddhism as a whole. His opinion and final decision is often sought on different matters relating to Tibetan Buddhism in general.

Regarding the Kagyu school headed by HH Karmapa Urgyen Trinley Dorje, the Karmapa is considered to be head of that school and not HH Dalai Lama. (although of course they are both great friends and HH Dalai Lama is regarded with equal respect by Kagyu practitioners)

The whole tulku system began in Tibet with the Karmapas in the 12th century. The first Karmapa Dusum Chenpa made predictions about future Karmapas and before he died gave a letter giving details about his next incarnation to his main student Drogon Renchen (predecessor of the Tai Situpa's).


Regarding Retro's question about HH Dalai Lama's death :

At the present day, there is talk by many in the Tibetan Buddhist exile community and elsewhere, that the young Karmapa Urgyen Trinley Dorje will replace HH Dalai Lama as the most important figure in Tibetan Buddhism when HH Dalai Lama dies.


Here are some articles which mention that.

This is one from last year

http://www.buddhistchannel.tv/index.php?id=70,6192,0,0,1,0

and here's a more recent one:

http://www.newsweek.com/id/185796


Here is a photo of HH Dalai Lama with HH karmapa. May they both live long lives and continue to benefit others with their teachings_/\_


Image



Kind regards,

Dazzle :anjali:
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Drolma » Tue Jun 02, 2009 12:56 pm

retrofuturist wrote:Greetings Ngawang Drolma,

Ngawang Drolma wrote:I feel that we can rely on His Holiness the Dalai Lama for a Vajrayana perspective.

(Apologies if it's an inauspicious subject but...) What will you do after he dies? The Vajrayana tradition will outlive him... then who will be relied on for a definitive perspective? If you're relying on a single source and that source is a person, then isn't the definitive position going to keep changing with each encumbent (a little like the changing of the popes in the Vatican)?

Metta,
Retro. :)


Hi Retro,

His Holiness Dalai Lama's teachings will not die when his physical body dies, they will be around to guide those of us who take refuge in his wisdom and compassion, for a long long time. Each Dalai Lama had something special and different to offer, so strictly speaking, one does not replace another. I don't believe that anyone can replace anyone else, every special teacher brings something fresh and something unique depending on causes and conditions - always bringing what is most suitable at that time. Just as the Buddha is no longer around physically to guide us, his teachings do, and it is in those dharma teachings that we take and find our refuge; when we study and practice those teachings, Lord Buddha is still here, that is how we know him, through his teachings.

In the snowy mountain paradise
You're the source of good and happiness,
Powerful Tenzin Gyatso Chenresig,
May you stay until samsara ends.

http://www.dalailama.com/page.51.htm
Last edited by Drolma on Tue Jun 02, 2009 3:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Drolma » Tue Jun 02, 2009 1:22 pm

"Ngawang Drolma",

The primary role of the Dalai Lamas has been temporal, but of course he's also viewed by many as a spiritual master.

The Dalai Lama promotes a philosophy which engages all four schools of Tibetan Buddhism.



Yes, The Gaden Tri Rinpoche is actually the head of the Gelukpas, His Holiness Dalai Lama engages all four schools of Tibetan Buddhism. :heart:
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Ngawang Drolma » Tue Jun 02, 2009 4:03 pm

Drolma wrote:
"Ngawang Drolma",

The primary role of the Dalai Lamas has been temporal, but of course he's also viewed by many as a spiritual master.

The Dalai Lama promotes a philosophy which engages all four schools of Tibetan Buddhism.



Yes, The Gaden Tri Rinpoche is actually the head of the Gelukpas, His Holiness Dalai Lama engages all four schools of Tibetan Buddhism. :heart:


Thanks for emphasizing this, Drolma.

I didn't mean to mislead with my words. The four schools are separate and have separate heads. And there is certainly no Buddhist 'pope.' However, there is a common regard for HHDL as a spiritual master in all four Tibetan traditions.

Thanks,
Laura
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Ngawang Drolma » Tue Jun 02, 2009 4:06 pm

Dazzle wrote:.

.

HH Dalai Lama is head of the Gelug school and was political head of Tibet. However he is not the head of the Nyingma, Kagyu and Sakya schools. Because he is such a public figure and revered my many people worldwide, it is often assumed that he is the head of Tibetan Buddhism. His teachings and position are of course acknowledged and greatly respected by all the schools and his teachings considered to be representative of Tibetan Buddhism as a whole. His opinion and final decision is often sought on different matters relating to Tibetan Buddhism in general.

Regarding the Kagyu school headed by HH Karmapa Urgyen Trinley Dorje, the Karmapa is considered to be head of that school and not HH Dalai Lama. (although of course they are both great friends and HH Dalai Lama is regarded with equal respect by Kagyu practitioners)

The whole tulku system began in Tibet with the Karmapas in the 12th century. The first Karmapa Dusum Chenpa made predictions about future Karmapas and before he died gave a letter giving details about his next incarnation to his main student Drogon Renchen (predecessor of the Tai Situpa's).


Regarding Retro's question about HH Dalai Lama's death :

At the present day, there is talk by many in the Tibetan Buddhist exile community and elsewhere, that the young Karmapa Urgyen Trinley Dorje will replace HH Dalai Lama as the most important figure in Tibetan Buddhism when HH Dalai Lama dies.


Here are some articles which mention that.

This is one from last year

http://www.buddhistchannel.tv/index.php?id=70,6192,0,0,1,0

and here's a more recent one:

http://www.newsweek.com/id/185796

Kind regards,

Dazzle :anjali:


Dazzle,

Thank you for this informative, helpful post. :namaste:

Best,
Laura
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Dazzle » Tue Jun 02, 2009 4:10 pm

.

Drolma -
Yes, The Gaden Tri Rinpoche is actually the head of the Gelukpas,


Being a Kagyu student myself I had always assumed HH Dalai Lama was head of the Gelugpa school.

I just read here that the Ganden Rinpoche is an appointed office and not a reincarnation lineage and HHDL is temporal head of Gelug -a position of greater political authority but lower spiritual rank.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ganden_Tripa


.
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Drolma » Tue Jun 02, 2009 4:49 pm

but lower spiritual rank


these kind of 'conclusions' are why I don't consider wikipedia to be a completely reliable source of information.

Further information:


From His Holiness Dalai Lama's site a brief biography:


"His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, is both the head of state and the spiritual leader of Tibet. He was born on 6 July 1935, to a farming family, in a small hamlet located in Taktser, Amdo, northeastern Tibet. At the age of two the child, who was named Lhamo Dhondup at that time was recognized as the reincarnation of the 13th Dalai Lama, Thubten Gyatso. The Dalai Lamas are believed to be manifestations of Avalokiteshvara or Chenrezig, the Bodhisattva of Compassion and patron saint of Tibet. Bodhisattvas are enlightened beings who have postponed their own nirvana and chosen to take rebirth in order to serve humanity. "

source:


http://www.dalailama.com/page.105.htm

about the Gelug Tradition:


The head of the Gelug tradition, the Ganden Tripa (dGa’-ldan khri-pa, Ganden Throne Holder), is a position that any qualified monk can attain. The position alternates between the senior-most retired abbots of Gyumay (rGyud-smad Grva-tshang) and Gyuto (rGyud-stod Grva-tshang) Upper and Lower Tantric Colleges and is for seven years only. The Dalai Lamas are not the heads of the Gelug tradition.

source:
http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/index.html

about this source:

http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/about/about/message_from_holiness_dalai_lama.html
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Ngawang Drolma » Tue Jun 02, 2009 4:56 pm

Hi Drolma & Dazz,

While the head of the Gelupas is Ganden Tripa, the way I understand it is that HHDL is commonly accepted among all four schools as a spiritual master. As Dazz mentioned, his advice is often sought out and he has great knowledge across all four traditions. While he's not a pope, he is well-loved and respected. And he's the temporal leader of the Tibetan Government in Exile. That's why I mentioned further up in the thread that it was safe to take his words (regarding how should aim to treat other religions) as a solid Vajrayana perspective. All that said, if anyone sees the situation differently please feel free to share your thoughts.


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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Dazzle » Tue Jun 02, 2009 5:11 pm

While the head of the Gelupas is Ganden Tripa, the way I understand it is that HHDL is commonly accepted among all four schools as a spiritual master. As Dazz mentioned, his advice is often sought out and he has great knowledge across all four traditions. While he's not a pope, he is well-loved and respected, his advice is often sought out. And he's the temporal leader of the Tibetan Government in Exile. That's why I mentioned further up in the thread that it was safe to take his words (regarding how should aim to treat other religions) as a solid Vajrayana perspective. All that said, if anyone sees the situation differently please feel free to share your thoughts.





I am in absolute agreement with you dear Dharma sister Ngawang Drolma ...and although I am a Kagyu student I have had the excellent good fortune to also have attended the teachings of HH Dalai Lama.

:anjali:
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Re: The Buddhist View Toward Other Religions

Postby Ngawang Drolma » Tue Jun 02, 2009 5:13 pm

I am in absolute agreement with you dear Dharma sister Ngawang Drolma ...and although I am a Kagyu student I have had the excellent good fortune to also have attended the teachings of HH Dalai Lama.


Hi sister Dazz,

How wonderful for you!!

:namaste:
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