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Why are llamas significant? - Dhamma Wheel

Why are llamas significant?

Casual discussion amongst spiritual friends.
Seth19930
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Why are llamas significant?

Postby Seth19930 » Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:28 pm

Hello everyone, I'm having a very hard time finding the reason llamas are a significant symbol in Buddhism. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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Modus.Ponens
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby Modus.Ponens » Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:39 pm

They are a significant symbol in tibetan buddhism, not in theravada buddhism. In theravada, the importance is given to admirable friends, companions in the holy life.
He turns his mind away from those phenomena, and having done so, inclines his mind to the property of deathlessness: 'This is peace, this is exquisite — the resolution of all fabrications; the relinquishment of all acquisitions; the ending of craving; dispassion; cessation; Unbinding.'
(Jhana Sutta - Thanissaro Bhikkhu translation)

Seth19930
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby Seth19930 » Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:46 pm

Thanks! Well since I've already posted in a Theravada discussion forum does anyone have knowledge pertaining to why llamas are significant in Tibetan Buddhism?

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daverupa
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby daverupa » Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:54 pm

Llamas aren't indigenous to Tibet...

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David N. Snyder
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby David N. Snyder » Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:59 pm

Which lama are you referring to? This one:

Image

Or this one:

Image
Image




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Aloka
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby Aloka » Wed Oct 17, 2012 9:00 pm

Here's a photo of a very important high llama.


Image

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daverupa
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby daverupa » Wed Oct 17, 2012 9:01 pm

The one-l lama,
He's a priest.
The two-l llama,
He's a beast.
And I will bet
A silk pajama
There isn't any
Three-l lllama.

-Ogden Nash

(Nash added as a footnote, *The author's attention has been called to a type of conflagration known as a three-alarmer. Pooh.)

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David N. Snyder
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby David N. Snyder » Wed Oct 17, 2012 9:17 pm

And with that note, let's move this to the lounge. :tongue:
Image




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Kim OHara
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby Kim OHara » Wed Oct 17, 2012 9:32 pm


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LonesomeYogurt
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Wed Oct 17, 2012 9:46 pm

Man I step out to get groceries and all the good llama puns are taken by the time I get back...

Just my luck!

Anyway a Lama is just a term for a highly respected teacher of Tibetan Buddhism - and as Tibetan Buddhism focuses heavily on student-teacher relationships and Dharma transmission, they form an integral part of the lineage chain that defines their school.
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta


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Ben
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby Ben » Wed Oct 17, 2012 11:48 pm

“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

(Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • •

e: [email protected]..

Seth19930
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby Seth19930 » Tue Oct 23, 2012 12:49 am

So the animal has no relation to the title in any symbolic way?

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mikenz66
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Oct 23, 2012 1:30 am


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Dan74
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby Dan74 » Tue Oct 23, 2012 1:45 am

_/|\_

Seth19930
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby Seth19930 » Mon Dec 31, 2012 1:49 am

Lama in Tibetan means weighty! I figured it out! Because the dharma is weighty!

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tiltbillings
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby tiltbillings » Mon Dec 31, 2012 3:02 am


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Aloka
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby Aloka » Tue Jan 01, 2013 12:42 pm


Raitanator
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Re: Why are llamas significant?

Postby Raitanator » Tue Jan 01, 2013 12:55 pm

It actually depends on what you practice. At some point, lama might become essential for the path, especially if one is trying to engage to tantric practices. As they saying goes: "guru is the path". However, there's plenty of mahayana, and some similar to theravadin tradition, which doesn't require any commitment or guru-disciple relationship. In addition, guru doesn't necessarily have to be a monk or a nun. There are also gurus who are laypeople.


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