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PostPosted: Mon Sep 02, 2013 9:57 pm 
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In this http://www.dharmawheel.net/viewtopic.php?f=48&t=13886 recent discussion Malcolm Namdrol-la made some very clear statements which I found very illuminating. So I wanted to share them and point to them again in this separate post (hope you do not mind Honorable Malcolm-la).
Anyway, thank you!

So, here they come:

Quote:
The suffering of samsara is horrible.

Actually understanding what the term "rig pa" means is important for those who wish to end their suffering, since all Dharma paths, both Hindu and Buddhist, define the cause of suffering as ignorance (avidyā, ma rig pa) and the cause of liberation as knowledge (vidyā, rig pa).

Understanding the distinction between Mahāmudra and Dzogchen is important for those who wish to follow one path versus the other, for whatever their personal reasons may be. For others the distinction may not be important.


Quote:
In the grand scheme of things there is almost nothing one can do to stem the suffering of others in samsara. Not even Buddha can remove the suffering of others. However, one can remove one's own suffering. And for this reason these sorts of conversations, in the grand scheme of things, are critically important.


Quote:
Yes, rig pa can be called "recognizing the nature the mind". You always have "the nature of mind".

Of course, there are Dzogchen teachings which criticize this approach however, because it is held that buddhahood cannot be found in the mind.

So calling rig pa "the recognition of the nature of the mind" is quite provisional.

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今以佛眼觀之佛與眾生同住解脫之床。無此無彼無二平等。
Now, observing with the eye of the Buddha, both the Buddha and ordinary beings are in the same liberated state. There is neither this nor that: there is only non-duality and identity.
- 空海 Kūkai 弘法大師 in Unjigi 吽字義 The Meaning of the Letter Hūṃ
new translation: Kūkai on the Philosophy of Language by Takagi Shingen and Dreitlein Eijō
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Our life is very simple, very direct, very beautiful, very vast and very terrifying, but it is not at all convenient.
- Anzan Hoshin Roshi


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 29, 2013 9:34 pm 
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Quote:
There is no afterlife, just one long bardo that begins with delusion and ends with awakening.


taken from http://www.dharmawheel.net/viewtopic.php?f=36&t=14140&view=unread&sid=85d265cd34a332ed0dc45b71dd878f6b#unread

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今以佛眼觀之佛與眾生同住解脫之床。無此無彼無二平等。
Now, observing with the eye of the Buddha, both the Buddha and ordinary beings are in the same liberated state. There is neither this nor that: there is only non-duality and identity.
- 空海 Kūkai 弘法大師 in Unjigi 吽字義 The Meaning of the Letter Hūṃ
new translation: Kūkai on the Philosophy of Language by Takagi Shingen and Dreitlein Eijō
_______
Our life is very simple, very direct, very beautiful, very vast and very terrifying, but it is not at all convenient.
- Anzan Hoshin Roshi


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 29, 2013 11:04 pm 
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WuMing wrote:
Quote:
There is no afterlife, just one long bardo that begins with delusion and ends with awakening.


taken from http://www.dharmawheel.net/viewtopic.php?f=36&t=14140&view=unread&sid=85d265cd34a332ed0dc45b71dd878f6b#unread


I like that one too. I've never seen it put quite that way before.

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This is (possibly) the teaching of Buddha.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 29, 2013 11:11 pm 
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gad rgyangs wrote:
WuMing wrote:
Quote:
There is no afterlife, just one long bardo that begins with delusion and ends with awakening.


taken from http://www.dharmawheel.net/viewtopic.php?f=36&t=14140&view=unread&sid=85d265cd34a332ed0dc45b71dd878f6b#unread


I like that one too. I've never seen it put quite that way before.



Can't take credit for it, it comes from Nyi ma 'bum, 11th century.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 2:58 pm 
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Quote:
One must distinguish Dharma from culture, yes, even in sutras.


source: Was Nāgārjuna a misogynist?

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今以佛眼觀之佛與眾生同住解脫之床。無此無彼無二平等。
Now, observing with the eye of the Buddha, both the Buddha and ordinary beings are in the same liberated state. There is neither this nor that: there is only non-duality and identity.
- 空海 Kūkai 弘法大師 in Unjigi 吽字義 The Meaning of the Letter Hūṃ
new translation: Kūkai on the Philosophy of Language by Takagi Shingen and Dreitlein Eijō
_______
Our life is very simple, very direct, very beautiful, very vast and very terrifying, but it is not at all convenient.
- Anzan Hoshin Roshi


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:16 am 
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Great idea.

Virgo

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http://www.dalailama.com/webcasts/post/336-je-tsongkhapas-great-stages-of-the-path
http://www.ripple.org
http://caretoclick.com/save-the-rainforests/donate-clicks-likes-and-tweets-to-fight-climate-change-and-deforestation


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 12:58 pm 
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I've had the incredible fortune to read Malcolm for almost a decade. It's hard to express how beneficial it has been for me. That's the truth.

Kevin

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ओं मणिपद्मे हूं

http://www.dalailama.com/webcasts/post/336-je-tsongkhapas-great-stages-of-the-path
http://www.ripple.org
http://caretoclick.com/save-the-rainforests/donate-clicks-likes-and-tweets-to-fight-climate-change-and-deforestation


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:03 pm 
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Me too.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:17 pm 
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Virgo wrote:
I've had the incredible fortune to read Malcolm for almost a decade. It's hard to express how beneficial it has been for me. That's the truth.

Kevin


If you want to see some old stuff from 96 onward, search the usenet archives:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searc ... |sort:date

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:22 pm 
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Perhaps this is something that should be discussed in another thread. But when I read quotes like this

"In the grand scheme of things there is almost nothing one can do to stem the suffering of others in samsara. Not even Buddha can remove the suffering of others. However, one can remove one's own suffering. And for this reason these sorts of conversations, in the grand scheme of things, are critically important."

It kind of feels somewhat discouraging. I mean isn't the blessings from the 3 jewls and the 3 roots akin to a protective benelovent force that can aid us immensely? Basicly it can feel somewhat pointless to truly and wholeheartedly take refuge if we are repeadly to told "basicly, you are on your own".


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 2:32 pm 
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Great, that this thread finds some echo!

Malcolm's contributions here on Dharmawheel are very valuable and indeed very illuminating!
It is always a joy to read them and to follow his reasonings!

_________________
今以佛眼觀之佛與眾生同住解脫之床。無此無彼無二平等。
Now, observing with the eye of the Buddha, both the Buddha and ordinary beings are in the same liberated state. There is neither this nor that: there is only non-duality and identity.
- 空海 Kūkai 弘法大師 in Unjigi 吽字義 The Meaning of the Letter Hūṃ
new translation: Kūkai on the Philosophy of Language by Takagi Shingen and Dreitlein Eijō
_______
Our life is very simple, very direct, very beautiful, very vast and very terrifying, but it is not at all convenient.
- Anzan Hoshin Roshi


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 2:32 pm 
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AlexanderS wrote:
Perhaps this is something that should be discussed in another thread. But when I read quotes like this

"In the grand scheme of things there is almost nothing one can do to stem the suffering of others in samsara. Not even Buddha can remove the suffering of others. However, one can remove one's own suffering. And for this reason these sorts of conversations, in the grand scheme of things, are critically important."

It kind of feels somewhat discouraging. I mean isn't the blessings from the 3 jewls and the 3 roots akin to a protective benelovent force that can aid us immensely? Basicly it can feel somewhat pointless to truly and wholeheartedly take refuge if we are repeadly to told "basicly, you are on your own".


I would suggest to move this to the Mahayana General Forum section.

_________________
今以佛眼觀之佛與眾生同住解脫之床。無此無彼無二平等。
Now, observing with the eye of the Buddha, both the Buddha and ordinary beings are in the same liberated state. There is neither this nor that: there is only non-duality and identity.
- 空海 Kūkai 弘法大師 in Unjigi 吽字義 The Meaning of the Letter Hūṃ
new translation: Kūkai on the Philosophy of Language by Takagi Shingen and Dreitlein Eijō
_______
Our life is very simple, very direct, very beautiful, very vast and very terrifying, but it is not at all convenient.
- Anzan Hoshin Roshi


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 12:15 am 
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Quote:
All Buddhist paths lead to buddhahood, some sooner, some later.

from
How is Dzogchen/Mahamudra different from Zazen Samadhi

_________________
今以佛眼觀之佛與眾生同住解脫之床。無此無彼無二平等。
Now, observing with the eye of the Buddha, both the Buddha and ordinary beings are in the same liberated state. There is neither this nor that: there is only non-duality and identity.
- 空海 Kūkai 弘法大師 in Unjigi 吽字義 The Meaning of the Letter Hūṃ
new translation: Kūkai on the Philosophy of Language by Takagi Shingen and Dreitlein Eijō
_______
Our life is very simple, very direct, very beautiful, very vast and very terrifying, but it is not at all convenient.
- Anzan Hoshin Roshi


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 12:25 am 
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Quote:
Most important point of practice is to be relaxed but sharp. ... neither agitated nor lethargic.


from
How is Dzogchen/Mahamudra different from Zazen Samadhi

_________________
今以佛眼觀之佛與眾生同住解脫之床。無此無彼無二平等。
Now, observing with the eye of the Buddha, both the Buddha and ordinary beings are in the same liberated state. There is neither this nor that: there is only non-duality and identity.
- 空海 Kūkai 弘法大師 in Unjigi 吽字義 The Meaning of the Letter Hūṃ
new translation: Kūkai on the Philosophy of Language by Takagi Shingen and Dreitlein Eijō
_______
Our life is very simple, very direct, very beautiful, very vast and very terrifying, but it is not at all convenient.
- Anzan Hoshin Roshi


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 8:23 pm 
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Quote:
Liberation, in Mahāyāna, is merely the realization that "all conditioned things are in a state of nirvana from the beginning".

It means realizing that the nature of the arising, etc., is precisely, non-arising.

As a tantra states:

"Everything arose from non-arising,
even arising never arose."


from Difference between consciousness and the mind

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今以佛眼觀之佛與眾生同住解脫之床。無此無彼無二平等。
Now, observing with the eye of the Buddha, both the Buddha and ordinary beings are in the same liberated state. There is neither this nor that: there is only non-duality and identity.
- 空海 Kūkai 弘法大師 in Unjigi 吽字義 The Meaning of the Letter Hūṃ
new translation: Kūkai on the Philosophy of Language by Takagi Shingen and Dreitlein Eijō
_______
Our life is very simple, very direct, very beautiful, very vast and very terrifying, but it is not at all convenient.
- Anzan Hoshin Roshi


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2014 8:49 pm 
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Just wanted to add my name to the list of people that appreciate Malcolm for explaining things so clearly.
Not sure if it was in fact the "Differences between consciousness and the mind" thread, but one of his recent expositions on Madhyamaka (esp Madhyamaka-Yogacara of Santaraksita) was probably the most lucid explanation of emptiness (& Buddhadharma on the whole) that I've ever seen. The quote "empty all the way down" comes to mind. Learned a lot from that one and it cleared up any Advaita leanings I might've had. Still feel such a philosophical approach and Dzogchen are a bit beyond my capacities at this point, but it was really nice to have some corrective guidance to keep me from going too far off track. Going to have to make more of an effort to read more of his stuff.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 12:24 am 
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I have learned a great deal from reading his posts as well. The way he describes things are very concise and clear.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 12:34 am 
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Quote:

"In the grand scheme of things there is almost nothing one can do to stem the suffering of others in samsara. Not even Buddha can remove the suffering of others. However, one can remove one's own suffering. And for this reason these sorts of conversations, in the grand scheme of things, are critically important."



So true. Buddhas are devoid of omnipotence.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2014 6:27 pm 
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Quote:
... we treat buddhahood as if it were a state -- the term state implies something steady -- when one thing changes into another thing, we call that a "change of state". But buddhahood is no more a state that ignorance is. In other words, ultimately there is no buddhahood. Buddhahood is just a name for a relative appearance. When the causes and conditions that support that appearance cease, so does buddhahood.

Buddhahood is just the realization of that principle.


from Attainment of Buddhahood is impossible

_________________
今以佛眼觀之佛與眾生同住解脫之床。無此無彼無二平等。
Now, observing with the eye of the Buddha, both the Buddha and ordinary beings are in the same liberated state. There is neither this nor that: there is only non-duality and identity.
- 空海 Kūkai 弘法大師 in Unjigi 吽字義 The Meaning of the Letter Hūṃ
new translation: Kūkai on the Philosophy of Language by Takagi Shingen and Dreitlein Eijō
_______
Our life is very simple, very direct, very beautiful, very vast and very terrifying, but it is not at all convenient.
- Anzan Hoshin Roshi


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2014 7:51 pm 
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WuMing wrote:
Quote:
... we treat buddhahood as if it were a state -- the term state implies something steady -- when one thing changes into another thing, we call that a "change of state". But buddhahood is no more a state that ignorance is. In other words, ultimately there is no buddhahood. Buddhahood is just a name for a relative appearance. When the causes and conditions that support that appearance cease, so does buddhahood.

Buddhahood is just the realization of that principle.


from Attainment of Buddhahood is impossible


Sadhu !


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