Indian Vajrayana

Moderator: Tibetan Buddhism moderators

Re: Indian Vajrayana

Postby Khechara » Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:36 am

Yes, that is an interesting article. I wish I could get my hands on his dissertation (“Becoming Indian: A Study of the Life of the 16th–17th Century Tibetan Lama Tāranātha.” PhD diss., Monash University, 2008).

There is also some interesting discussion of late Indian Vajrayana in the nath community in "From Bodhgaya to Lhasa to Beijing: The Life and Times of Sariputra (c. 1335-1426),Last Abbot of Bodhgaya" by Arthur Philip McKeown, http://www.scribd.com/doc/117058153/McKeown-Arthur-Philip-From-Bodhgaya-to-Lhasa-to-Beijing-The-Life-and-Times-of-Sariputra-c-1335-1426-%EF%BC%8CLast-Abbot-of-Bodhgaya, particularly in the introduction. McKeown writes (pg 25):

Increasingly, denying Indian Buddhism's survival creates more problems than it solves. The real questions are how and when it finally disappeared from India. Historians like D.C. Sircar argue that it survived in "family lineages," even if Buddhism's institutional form disappeared sometime before the eighteenth century. If a date were needed to mark Buddhism's demise, the fifteenth/sixteenth to eighteenth centuries interval provides one marker. Such decline would be neither drastic, dramatic, nor cataclysmic, but a more even downward slope with periodic resurgences.


Thanks for sharing the McKeown book, Greg. I have downloaded it and will give it a read soon. Is Templeman's dissertation on Lama Taranatha published somewhere?

McKeown's introduction is spot-on. This is another argument which I whole-heartedly agree with. Whilst Buddhism's institutional form has more or less disappeared in modern India it would be illogical to assume that it hasn't survived, even fractionally, within 'family lineages'. Bengal still has its share of practicing Buddhists and renowned scholars of Indology and Tantrism like Mm. Haraprasad Shastri, who was responsible for discovering the 'Charyapada' manuscripts; and his son Benoytosh Bhattacharya, author of ''Indian Buddhist Iconography'' and ''Introduction to Buddhist Esoterism'', were Buddhists. Perhaps it is imperative that a modern study of the presence of Buddhism in Bengal and its neighboring areas be facilitated for a better understanding of this situation.
Khechara
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Mon Oct 07, 2013 6:01 pm

Re: Indian Vajrayana

Postby Greg » Thu Oct 10, 2013 4:16 pm

You're welcome! Unfortunately I'm pretty sure Templeton's dissertation is unpublished and not easy to get.

I also remember Malcolm commented at one point, I think on esangha (I can't find the thread),

Chris Fynn, a number of years ago, wrote that his teacher, Kunnu Lama, had met some externally Hindu sadhus in Varanasi in the 1930's, who secretly practiced Chakrasamvara-- he was able to identify these practitioner through the secret signs given in the tantras for practitioners to be able to recognize each other at the pithas and the upapithas.

So it seems that in fact there are some very hidden lineages of Buddhist Vajrayana that managed to survive into 20th century and possibly to this day.

So that is interesting too.
Greg
 
Posts: 271
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 6:42 pm

Re: Indian Vajrayana

Postby KonchokZoepa » Thu Oct 10, 2013 4:56 pm

yes, that is very interesting.
If the thought of demons
Never rises in your mind,
You need not fear the demon hosts around you.
It is most important to tame your mind within....

In so far as the Ultimate, or the true nature of being is concerned,
there are neither buddhas or demons.
He who frees himself from fear and hope, evil and virtue,
will realize the insubstantial and groundless nature of confusion.
Samsara will then appear as the mahamudra itself….

-Milarepa

OMMANIPADMEHUNG

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ls6P9tOYmdo
KonchokZoepa
 
Posts: 1358
Joined: Tue Sep 10, 2013 9:50 pm

Re: Indian Vajrayana

Postby Khechara » Fri Oct 11, 2013 7:00 am

Greg wrote:You're welcome! Unfortunately I'm pretty sure Templeton's dissertation is unpublished and not easy to get.

I also remember Malcolm commented at one point, I think on esangha (I can't find the thread),

Chris Fynn, a number of years ago, wrote that his teacher, Kunnu Lama, had met some externally Hindu sadhus in Varanasi in the 1930's, who secretly practiced Chakrasamvara-- he was able to identify these practitioner through the secret signs given in the tantras for practitioners to be able to recognize each other at the pithas and the upapithas.

So it seems that in fact there are some very hidden lineages of Buddhist Vajrayana that managed to survive into 20th century and possibly to this day.

So that is interesting too.


This post just made the conversation more interesting.
Khechara
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Mon Oct 07, 2013 6:01 pm

Re: Indian Vajrayana

Postby invisiblediamond » Tue Oct 15, 2013 1:37 am

The Phatingpa brothers were Naropa'a best disciples. I wonder if there might be their remnant in Nepal. There might be someone there keeping Naropa's original teachings alive.
invisiblediamond
 
Posts: 260
Joined: Wed Jun 12, 2013 5:21 pm

Previous

Return to Tibetan Buddhism

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: bryandavis, jaidyncasey, monktastic, supermaxv, underthetree and 22 guests

>