Vows of Manjushri

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Nicholas Weeks
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Vows of Manjushri

Postby Nicholas Weeks » Mon Mar 07, 2011 12:25 am

All bodhisattvas make personal vows in addition to the general ones. Anyone know what Manjushri's vows were?
A bodhisattva does not become weary of evil beings nor does he commit the error of bringing forth thoughts inclined to reject them and cast them aside. Avatamsaka Sutra, ch. 25

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Re: Vows of Manjushri

Postby plwk » Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:07 am

I recall this topic on E-Sangha's Mahayana Forum and remember finding some answers with another poster, one with a text stating 10 Vows and another 18 Vows, but have lost those links...but this is all I gathered for now (it's in Chinese and Indonesian) but this blog site has references to the True Buddha School but states on the 10 Vows as stemming from a 'Taisho Tripitaka Book 20 , No. 1177A'《大乘瑜伽金剛性海曼殊室利千臂千缽大教王經》
"dà chéng yú jiā jīn gāng xìng hǎi màn shū shì lì qiān bì qiān bō dà jiào wáng jīng" or 'Mahayana yoga vajratta sagara manjusri sahasrabhuja sahasrapatra mahasasanaraja sutra". Link: http://rigjedma-myblog.blogspot.com/201 ... satva.html
And from an Indonesian Buddhist forum site: http://www.kaskus.us/showthread.php?t=4961978&page=4
(I can understand the Indonesian but would lack the skills to translate it into English...)

But if you can read Chinese: http://www.cbeta.org/result/T20/T20n1177a.htm

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Anders
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Re: Vows of Manjushri

Postby Anders » Mon Mar 07, 2011 12:56 pm

"Even if my body should be burnt to death in the fires of hell
I would endure it for myriad lifetimes
As your companion in practice"

--- Gandavyuha Sutra

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Re: Vows of Manjushri

Postby Nicholas Weeks » Tue Mar 08, 2011 2:49 am

Thanks for the responses. If Anders' memory comes up with the title of the sutra, let us know. I do not suppose we would be lucky enough that it was translated by Chang in his old Ratnakuta collection? Today arrived Mipham's book on the Eight Great Heart-sons and the largest section is on Manjushri, so maybe those vows are mentioned there.

[edit] Yes, Mipham's A Garland of Jewels quotes the Compassionate White Lotus sutra, where three and half pages of Manjushri's vows are given. Nearly all of them involve the nature & qualities of his supreme pure realm.
A bodhisattva does not become weary of evil beings nor does he commit the error of bringing forth thoughts inclined to reject them and cast them aside. Avatamsaka Sutra, ch. 25

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Anders
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Re: Vows of Manjushri

Postby Anders » Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:49 am

"Even if my body should be burnt to death in the fires of hell
I would endure it for myriad lifetimes
As your companion in practice"

--- Gandavyuha Sutra

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Re: Vows of Manjushri

Postby Astus » Tue Mar 08, 2011 12:27 pm

It is in Chang's collection.
chapter 10: The Prediction of Manjusri's Attainment of Buddhahood
Sutra 15, Taisho 310, pp. 336-350. translated into Chinese by Siksananda

The land equal to Manjusri's:
"In the east, there is a Buddha-land named Abiding in the Uncexcelled Vow, which is so far away that to get there one must pass worlds as innumerable as the sands of ten billion Ganges Rivers. There is a Buddha there named King of Universal, Eternal Light and Meritorious Ocean. The life span of that Buddha is immeasurable and infinite. He always teaches the Dharma to Bodhisattvas. Good man, the merits and magnificence of that Buddha-land are exactly like those of Universal Sight's Buddha-land."

Some words of wisdom from the text:
Bodhisattva Lion of Thundering Voice asked, "Virtuous One, do you not seek enlightenment?"
Manjusri answered, "No. Why not? Because Manjusri is no other than enlightenment and vice versa. Why? because 'Manjusri' is only an arbitrary name and so is 'supreme enlightenment.' Furthermore, the name is nonexistent and cannot act; therefore, it is empty. The nature of emptiness is no other than enlightenment."
...
Good man, the Buddha-Dharma is neither a dharma nor a nondharma. Why? Because the Buddha-Dharma arises from nowhere. If a novice Bodhisattva hears this statement and becomes frightned, he will eventually attain enlightenment. Observing this, one may think, "I must first bring forth bodhicitta and abide in [deep] realization; then I can attain Buddhahood. Otherwise, if I do not bring forth bodhicitta, I can never attain Budhahood.' [Hoever, actually one should not even] harbor this kind of discrimination, because both bodhicitta and Buddhahood are inapprehensible. If they are inapprehensible, how can they be observed? If they cannot be observed, the realization will not be possible. Why not? Because without observation, realization would have no [germinating] cause.
Good man, what do you think? Can empty space attain enlightenment?
Bodhisattva Lion of Thundering Voice answered, "No."
Manjusri asked, "Good man, has the Tathagata realized that all dharmas are the same as empty space?"
Bodhisattva Lion of Thundering Voice answered, "Yes, he has."
Manjusri said, "Good man, enlightenment is like empty space and empty space is like enlightenment. Englightenment and empty space are neither two nor different. If a Bodhisattva knows this equality, then there will be neither that which he knows [and sees] nor that which he does not know or see."
...
To achieve perfection in the Buddha-Dharmas is to achieve perfection in suchness. To achieve perfection in suchness is to achieve perfection in empty space. Thus, the Buddha-Dharmas, suchness, and empty space are [all] one and the same. Good man, you ask, 'How can one achieve perfection in all Buddha-Dharmas?' Just as a person can achieve perfection in form, felling, conception, impulse, and consciousness, so he can achieve perfection in all Buddha-Dharmas."
Bodhisattva Lion of Thundering Voice asked, "What does it mean to achieve perfection in form and other dharmas?"
Manjusri asked in turn, "Good man, what do you think? Is the form you see permanent of impermanent?"
Bodhisattva Lion of Thundering Voice said, "It is neither."
Manjusri asked, "Good man, if something is neither permanent nor impermanent, does it increase or decrease?"
Bodhisattva Lion of Thundering Voice answered, "No."
Manjusri said, "Good man, if you realize that things do not increase or decrease, you are said to achieve perfection in them. Why so? If you do not thoroughly understand things, you will make discriminations among them. If you thoroughly understand things, you will not make discriminations among them. If things are not discriminated, they do not increase or decrease. If they do not increase or decrease, they are equal. Good man, if you see equality in form, you achieve perfection in form. The same is true with feeling, conception, impulse, consciousness, and all other dharmas."
Then, Bodhisattva Lion of Thundering Voice asked Manjusri, "Virtuous One, since you achieved the Realization of the Nonarising of Dharmas, you have never harbored a notion [in your mind] of attaining supreme enlightenment. Why do you now urge others to progress toward enlightenment?"
Manjusri answered, "I really do not urge any sentient beings to progress toward enlightenment. Why? because sentient beings are nonexistent and devoid of self-entity. If sentient beings were apprehensible, I would cause them to progress toward enlightenment, but since they are inapprehensible, I do not urge them to do so. Why? Because enlightenment and sentient beings are equal and not different from each other. Equality cannot be sought by equality. In equality, nothing originates. Therefore, I often say that one should observe all phenomena as coming from nowhere and going nowhere, which is called equality, that is, emptiness. In emptiness, there is nothing to seek. Good man, you said, 'Since you achieved the Realization of the Nonarising of Dharmas, you have never harbored a notion [in your mind] of attaining supreme enlightenment.' Good man, do you see the mind? Do you rely on the mind to attain enlightenment?"
Bodhisattva Lion of Thundering Voice said, "No, Manjusri. Why not? because the mind, unlike form, is invisible, and so is enlightenment. They are arbitrary names only. The names 'mind' and 'enlightenment' do not exist."
Manjusri said, Good man, there is an esoteric implication in your statement that I have never harbored a notion [in my mind] of attaining enlightenment. Why? because the mind has never come into being, what can it apprehend or realize?"
Bodhisattva Lion of Thundering Voice asked, "What does it mean to realize equality?"
Manjusri answered, "To be detached from all dharmas is to realize equality. The so-called realization means the subtle wisdom, which neither arises nor ceases, is identical with suchness, and cannot be discriminated. If a Dharma-cultivator with right view comprehends the truth that in equality there is nothing to be attained, and does not attach himself either to multiplicity or to oneness, then he realizes equality. If a person realizes that all dharmas are signless, comprehends that signlessness is their sign, and does not cling to his body or mind, then he has perfectly realized equality."
Bodhisattva Lion of Thundering Voice asked, "What is 'attainemnt'?"
Manjusri answered, "'Attainment' is a conventional expression, In fact, what saints attain is inexpressible. Why? Because the Dharma resets upon nothing and is beyond speech. Furthermore, good man, to regard nonattainment as attainment, and as neither attainment nor nonattainment, is called [the true] attainment."
Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.



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Nicholas Weeks
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Re: Vows of Manjushri

Postby Nicholas Weeks » Wed Mar 09, 2011 3:19 am

A bodhisattva does not become weary of evil beings nor does he commit the error of bringing forth thoughts inclined to reject them and cast them aside. Avatamsaka Sutra, ch. 25

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Re: Vows of Manjushri

Postby Astus » Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:40 am

Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.



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Astus
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Posts: 6615
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Re: Vows of Manjushri

Postby Astus » Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:50 pm

Myriad dharmas are only mind.
Mind is unobtainable.
What is there to seek?

If the Buddha-Nature is seen,
there will be no seeing of a nature in any thing.

Neither cultivation nor seated meditation —
this is the pure Chan of Tathagata.

With sudden enlightenment to Tathagata Chan,
the six paramitas and myriad means
are complete within that essence.



User avatar
Nicholas Weeks
Posts: 2820
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 4:21 am
Location: California

Re: Vows of Manjushri

Postby Nicholas Weeks » Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:30 am

A bodhisattva does not become weary of evil beings nor does he commit the error of bringing forth thoughts inclined to reject them and cast them aside. Avatamsaka Sutra, ch. 25


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