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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 3:58 pm 
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I'm in need of a book on how to train and discipline a dog (with the idea that a well-trained and disciplined dog is a happier one).

suggestions?

thanks

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 5:49 pm 
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Jikan wrote:
I'm in need of a book on how to train and discipline a dog (with the idea that a well-trained and disciplined dog is a happier one).

suggestions?

thanks


Most owners don't bother so well done! :)

This book is OK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/RSPCA-New-Compl ... 0751338672

I used to train dogs for obedience and agility when I was younger. I once put together a short evening course for new owners to choose, care for and train their new dogs, invented together with the guy who became the RSPCA and Dogs Trust top vet. If only such a course was compulsory! ;)

Different breeds respond very differently to the emotions you dispaly through your body and voice, and they also learn in different ways and have different distractions - a breed bred to work by scent will find all kinds of things to track, whereas a 'gaze-hound' like a whippet or lurcher will see a bird or rabbit hundreds of yards away - or even try to chase a plane.

I haven't found a breed yet that doesn't respond to reward - praise, titbits, favourite toys. It is also generally good to walk a dog or let it chase around until calm before the first few training sessions, but this tends not to work so well for terriers who can be manic for hours, or dogs like Dalmations bred to run 60 miles as coach guard dogs, in which case use that energy and enthusiasm and make training into a game.

Books are fine but it is also essential to get the dog to mix with lots of others and also to learn that you and your family are above it in the 'pack'. It is hard to restore that position once given away, unless you are the 'Dog Whisperer'. ;)

Oh, and it isn't all down to the owner, as some say - I've met some really dim-witted dogs! LOL :)

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 5:58 pm 
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The Dog Whisperer has written a number of books, has videos, etc.
that would be very helpful. The whole "calm, assertive energy of the pack leader" thing is spot on. And ... be consistent!


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 6:11 pm 
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Don't Shoot the Dog is a good book on positive reinforcement. Definitely required reading for all animal trainers. Even helps with training children if you have them.
Have pics of your new dog?


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 6:30 pm 
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I have a friend who's a dog trainer and though I haven't seen him in a while he was a bit hesitant about advocating all of Cesar Millan's methods. I've heard good things about Sophia Yin and Ian Dunbar.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.c ... L9D1N1.DTL
http://www.urbandawgs.com/divided_profession.html

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 6:33 pm 
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Jikan wrote:
I'm in need of a book on how to train and discipline a dog (with the idea that a well-trained and disciplined dog is a happier one).

suggestions?

thanks

I have had animals my whole life, grew up on a horse ranch and my mother owned a dog kennel at the same time.
The single best piece of advice I can think of when it comes to animals in general and this is absolutely essential with dogs.
Spend time with the dog in a quiet, relaxed environment. You have to get to know one another and define roles in the pack.
Well established and calm non-verbal communication will make your relationship with one another flourish.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 9:48 pm 
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This is all good stuff. Thanks, everyone.

I don't have a dog yet, but I am trying to convince the rest of my family (wife & two big tomcats) that rescuing a mutt is the terrific idea it so obviously is.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 9:54 pm 
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Jikan wrote:
This is all good stuff. Thanks, everyone.

I don't have a dog yet, but I am trying to convince the rest of my family (wife & two big tomcats) that rescuing a mutt is the terrific idea it so obviously is.



it is an excellent thing to do. Make sure it is OK with the cats and has no behavioural problems you are not able to handle.

We have 'rescued' quite a few.

You may be able to chose a breed and then locate its 'breed rescue' centre.

Alternatively, go for a mongrel and think of the breeds in its mix.

I have to say that my heart goes out to the many Staffordshire Bull Terriers, who have lovely temperaments but are tarred with the same brush as 'pitbulls'.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 9:58 pm 
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Best piece of advice I ever got was to make sure the dog had proper exercise and proper socialization. My dog is happier and more well behaved when he is tired. Regular walks and/or trips to the dog park are musts, obedience/bonding/etc flows naturally from that.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2012 10:21 pm 
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practitioner wrote:
Best piece of advice I ever got was to make sure the dog had proper exercise and proper socialization. My dog is happier and more well behaved when he is tired. Regular walks and/or trips to the dog park are musts, obedience/bonding/etc flows naturally from that.

This is a really important point as well.
Dogs naturally are inclined to roam and explore. If you do this with your dog you will be able to bond and your dog wont have anxiety issues etc.


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