The Dog Whisperer.

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The Dog Whisperer.

Postby muni » Wed Jan 12, 2011 11:45 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cffj0vOBWsc&feature=fvw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBRV2cXC ... re=related

Lots of animals are abandoned, because people cannot educate them properly. Many people are suffering and struggling with their suffering struggling dogs as they don't understand each other.

I looked to the dog whisperer few times and his technics seem very good. Be assertive and calm.

Also be in a whole-connection with the dog, do not remain in your head. This part is pretty useful for people connection as well.
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Re: The Dog Whisperer.

Postby Blue Garuda » Wed Jan 12, 2011 12:23 pm

muni wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cffj0vOBWsc&feature=fvw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBRV2cXC ... re=related

Lots of animals are abandoned, because people cannot educate them properly. Many people are suffering and struggling with their suffering struggling dogs as they don't understand each other.

I looked to the dog whisperer few times and his technics seem very good. Be assertive and calm.

Also be in a whole-connection with the dog, do not remain in your head. This part is pretty useful for people connection as well.


He explains things from the perspective of dogs as pack animals, and the energy they are able to detect in other beings. In sensory terms they make use of not only body language but their very powerful sense of smell etc. Of course, there is also the pack psychology which from the dog's perspective may be placing humans in a very different hierarchy from the one the humans think they occupy.

When I used to train dogs for obedience and agility, it was immediately apparent to my dogs if I felt at all insecure or lacking in confidence, however experienced I was or how much I tried to hide it. 'Acting' calm and assertive won't work - you must 'be' calm and assertive. As you say - there are many lessons for humans. ;)
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Re: The Dog Whisperer.

Postby muni » Wed Jan 12, 2011 1:08 pm

Yes, we must learn to "smell" :smile: each others' energy in between the extremes of human-dog duality in "open space" to avoid afflictions are turning human-dog in harmful states and its effects.


"Dogs are very simple. Animals are very simple. We make it complicated for them, by not understanding who they are and what they need and their language and how they create their behavior."

Interesting how we make all complicated.

http://www.cesarsway.com/tips
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Re: The Dog Whisperer.

Postby retrofuturist » Thu Jan 13, 2011 4:35 am

Greetings,

We got a King Charles Cavalier / Beagle cross puppy named Penny in 2002. When we were out during the day at work, she used to cry a lot, so we got her a little friend Jumble... a KCC / Poodle cross. Jumble was the leader of the pack because Penny is a real ditz. Unfortunately, just over a week ago, Jumble was hit by a car whilst out for a walk and died a couple of hours later. Without Jumble around, Penny has been a complete mess. We thought maybe she would be able to adjust to being the sole dog but she was getting worse before she was getting better, crying regularly both day and night in Jumble's absence. A dog crying because its lost its best friend is a gut-wrenching sound, and about a week after Jumble's death it became apparent that we'd need to get Penny a companion... someone to be the 'leader'. Penny had chosen me as her leader in Jumble's absence, but what could I do? I'm not a dog, and I have a full-time job.

Thankfully, we found another dog quite quickly - here's his profile... http://www.petrescue.com.au/view/95664 . This 5-year old male poodle-cross (Cody) moved in with us yesterday and everyone seems to be settling in well. Cody used to have a buddy called Spud, but the two of them were split and adopted out separately (their owner is terminally ill)... so each dog is used to having another around, and both seem reasonably comfortable with each other. As they get to know each other better, and Cody gets to know us, I'm sure the new arrangement will work well. Even in the time we've had Cody (24 hours or so), Penny has lost the bloodshoot anguished look in her eyes and has only briefly cried once. We've done our best to accommodate Penny - everything from getting Jumble originally in 2002 to now getting Cody in 2011.... hopefully we've helped Cody out and that Jumble had a good life too. It's hard to work out what to do when dogs can't speak our language, but with patience, compassion and receptivity, it's possible to do our bit to reduce suffering in the canine world.

Maitri,
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Re: The Dog Whisperer.

Postby Ogyen » Thu Jan 13, 2011 5:55 am

I just rescued a dog over Christmas. I am not a dog-person, whatever that means. I'm not even really a pet-person. I live fine with or without pets. However, where we live, there are a lot of dogs that get lost, are abandoned, or even escape from abusive owners. There are strays everywhere, and sad stories are a dime-a-dozen.

My husband noticed our new rescue around our house for a couple days before Christmas. It had been raining very heavily, with flooding streets and everything. The dog had been trying to take shelter at the guard gate of the housing complex. He is very affectionate, and hilarious.

He has sarcoptic mange, I've been treating him personally for a few weeks, with the guidance of the best vet in town. He's in the house because it's been too cold for him in the garage, and I'd kept him there the first week, he was seriously depressed. He needed confinement, our other two dogs and cats are itching a bit more, so likely have contracted some of the sarcoptic mites. I'm not too worried, I'll get the house under control.

The rescued pooch is a pure bred older Basset Hound. He lovable, affectionate, slobbery, and so we've named him Sloppy George the First.
Image

He's bonded with me, but like Yeshe said, he knows when I'm even just a touch nervous. I'm not a dog-person, and I've felt skittish around him because I don't know how to make him do something and communicate to him what I want to see him do. But we've managed to strike up a bond and communication's been easy with him. I clap my hands to get his attention, make eye contact, talk to him simply with one word commands to start training him, I will need tips Yeshe, if you can give them.

Image

I was so traumatized by having to hold this poor dog while he was howling at the vets to get his nails trimmed. He was terrified left huge bruises on my legs. The vet kept reassuring me it was ok, but I was seriously traumatized. His claws had to be trimmed they were so long he couldn't walk well. I shook for a while after, cried, I felt so ridiculous, and it's not like I was harmed, but it was just really hard to hold him and hear him cry and not be able to help.

So it seems George will stay with us, he's very much "my dog" or more accurately I'm "his human" already. He's answering to his name, gives paw, has manners, has bonded with me as I've been cleaning him, taking care of his skin, medications, baths, dips in amitraz. Today was the third day of successfully not having accidents in the house at night. Poor thing, he was so panic'd when we gave him dry bedding and food. He was just itching, shaking, and leaning his head into my legs. It seemed like not even a question that I would do what I could to help him recover.

It's not even a big deal to have a bit of the itchies because of the mange, I've been the one handling him, so no one else in the house has itched but me. Before meeting this dog, I would have minded this quite a bit. I'm not very patient with animals the way I am with humans, and I think it's because I'm easily frustrated by the communication and my lack of ability/skill in effectively letting the animal know what we need to do to "make this work."

I just want little Georgie to be better. Vet says 15 days he'll feel a world better. I have 8 baths/dips scheduled for him that I am giving him myself. It's tricky because he knows when I hesitate and is a stubborn breed that just says, oh you're not fit to lead, I'll take charge. I'm learning to communicate with him in a way that works for the both of us. He hates the baths and dips and I totally feel for him, but he needs it to recover and stop chewing and tearing himself up...

Do you think dogs are smart enough to know when you're trying to help? I hope he understands that and doesn't just suffer at the things he doesn't like that I have to do, like baths and dips and vet visits...
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Re: The Dog Whisperer.

Postby muni » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:29 am

Thank you very much Yeshe, Retrofuturist, Ogyen. All the best Cody, Penny, Sloppy George! :namaste:
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Re: The Dog Whisperer.

Postby Blue Garuda » Thu Jan 13, 2011 1:08 pm

Ogyen wrote:I just rescued a dog over Christmas. I am not a dog-person, whatever that means. I'm not even really a pet-person. I live fine with or without pets. However, where we live, there are a lot of dogs that get lost, are abandoned, or even escape from abusive owners. There are strays everywhere, and sad stories are a dime-a-dozen.

My husband noticed our new rescue around our house for a couple days before Christmas. It had been raining very heavily, with flooding streets and everything. The dog had been trying to take shelter at the guard gate of the housing complex. He is very affectionate, and hilarious.

He has sarcoptic mange, I've been treating him personally for a few weeks, with the guidance of the best vet in town. He's in the house because it's been too cold for him in the garage, and I'd kept him there the first week, he was seriously depressed. He needed confinement, our other two dogs and cats are itching a bit more, so likely have contracted some of the sarcoptic mites. I'm not too worried, I'll get the house under control.

The rescued pooch is a pure bred older Basset Hound. He lovable, affectionate, slobbery, and so we've named him Sloppy George the First.
Image

He's bonded with me, but like Yeshe said, he knows when I'm even just a touch nervous. I'm not a dog-person, and I've felt skittish around him because I don't know how to make him do something and communicate to him what I want to see him do. But we've managed to strike up a bond and communication's been easy with him. I clap my hands to get his attention, make eye contact, talk to him simply with one word commands to start training him, I will need tips Yeshe, if you can give them.

Image

I was so traumatized by having to hold this poor dog while he was howling at the vets to get his nails trimmed. He was terrified left huge bruises on my legs. The vet kept reassuring me it was ok, but I was seriously traumatized. His claws had to be trimmed they were so long he couldn't walk well. I shook for a while after, cried, I felt so ridiculous, and it's not like I was harmed, but it was just really hard to hold him and hear him cry and not be able to help.

So it seems George will stay with us, he's very much "my dog" or more accurately I'm "his human" already. He's answering to his name, gives paw, has manners, has bonded with me as I've been cleaning him, taking care of his skin, medications, baths, dips in amitraz. Today was the third day of successfully not having accidents in the house at night. Poor thing, he was so panic'd when we gave him dry bedding and food. He was just itching, shaking, and leaning his head into my legs. It seemed like not even a question that I would do what I could to help him recover.

It's not even a big deal to have a bit of the itchies because of the mange, I've been the one handling him, so no one else in the house has itched but me. Before meeting this dog, I would have minded this quite a bit. I'm not very patient with animals the way I am with humans, and I think it's because I'm easily frustrated by the communication and my lack of ability/skill in effectively letting the animal know what we need to do to "make this work."

I just want little Georgie to be better. Vet says 15 days he'll feel a world better. I have 8 baths/dips scheduled for him that I am giving him myself. It's tricky because he knows when I hesitate and is a stubborn breed that just says, oh you're not fit to lead, I'll take charge. I'm learning to communicate with him in a way that works for the both of us. He hates the baths and dips and I totally feel for him, but he needs it to recover and stop chewing and tearing himself up...

Do you think dogs are smart enough to know when you're trying to help? I hope he understands that and doesn't just suffer at the things he doesn't like that I have to do, like baths and dips and vet visits...



Sounds like he's found himself a good home! :)

Your bond wiht him is important as he gains confidence. When he's more settled I would let other members of the family groom and feed him too, as it establishes them as senior in the 'pack'. For his claws to get like that he may have been shut up for long periods or just deprived exercise on hard ground.

He should get 'dry' by following the other dogs and also as he gets less nervous.

Yes, he will detect your caring mood, but it can easily be overridden by panic. We've had a rescue lurcher for 6 years and he still sometimes panics, screams and runs when a sudden noise or movement spooks him. Who knows how he was treated before we had him, but he is 90% OK and realistically may never be 100%.

Does he respond to English or Spanish now? Or both! LOL :)
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Re: The Dog Whisperer.

Postby muni » Mon Mar 21, 2011 12:10 pm

About the dog whisperer, there was a man in wheelchair who had educate two powerful but calm pitbull dogs. He explained the power is in own mind in a calm friendly (interactive) guiding way.

In a dog school I saw when mind is leading based on frustrations; emotions, thoughts (identifying with them), the dog turns nervous which than is making the leader even more frustrated and angry.

In that way many animals, not only dogs are victims of of humans' disturb emotions.

A bit repeating here, still: Good work by Cesar Milan. _/\_

p.s some are considered to be Buddhists, others are no "Buddhist" still insight is emerged in action.
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