Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Post sayings or stories you find interesting or useful.

Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Thu Oct 17, 2013 1:48 pm

Sawaddee Ka..Aemilius,

Like magic, today I saw a picture of the things Thai temples use for pouring water drop by drop while the monks chant Anumodhana blessing(@facebook)..then we pour the water on soil outside the temple for the Earth Goddess to witness.

Image

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sat Oct 26, 2013 1:43 pm

Mahajanaka Jataka : The Widow's Son....Today is Uposatha Day.

Sawaddee Ka :anjali:

This jataka is so popular/well known in Thailand, may be because Thai kids learn all the most 10 famous Jatakas at schools..the most impressive jataka is "Vessantara And Maddi"..became movies/tv series so many times.

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Mahajanaka Jataka : The Widow's Son
[http://khmerratana.blogspot.com/2010/04/ten-birth-stories-of-buddha.html]


Supreme Perfection of Perseverance

There once lived a king. Aritthajanaka of Mithila. He became suspicious and fearful of his brother, Polajanaka. He had Polajanaka put in chains. Polajanaka proclaimed his innocence, miraculously the chains fell off and he was able to escape. Later he came back with his followers to take his revenge against his brother. King Aritthajanaka died in the battle and his pregnant wife fled from Mithila by the help of Sakka, king of the gods, taking her on carriage to Kalacampa staying with a Brahmin teacher of great fame. She then delivered a son whom she called after his grandfather Mahajanaka. Mahajanaka was often teased by his playmates and called “the widow’s son”. One day he went to his mother, threatening to bite off her breasts if she did not tell him who his father was. She was forced to reveal to him the secret of his birth that he was the son of the former king of Mithila. When he was sixteen, he determined to regain his father’s kingdom with his mother’s support of some jewels. He boarded a vessel on a merchant venture. After seven days of plunging through the heavy sea, the overloaded ship was wrecked and began to sink. The Bhodhisatta did not panic. He with his superior strength was able to throw himself out of the ship and was floating in the ocean for seven days.

During this time the goddess Manimekhala was enjoying the pleasures of heaven, neglecting her duties as guardian of the sea. At last she spied him and took him in her arms, then flew with him and laid him in the middle of mango trees in Mithila. Also that period, king Polajanaka fell ill and died. The king had told his ministers to find a man worthy of being the king who could answer certain riddles, string the king’s powerful bow and please his daughter. Princess Sivali. There were many candidates for the throne but not successful. At last the ministers decided to send out the festive chariot to see if they could find a successor to Polajaka. The chariot took them to the park where Mahajanaka lay sleeping. They observed the Bhodhisatta, recognized the signs of royalty on his feet and took him to Mithila to crown him king. He was also able to fulfill all the conditions for becoming king. One day the king was wandering with his ministers when he observed two mango trees. The one being full of mangoes was broken down by the people who had come to pick the fruit, while the other, though barren, stood green and whole. Thus he came to understand that possessions bring only sorrow and he determined to put aside his kingdom and take up the life of an ascetic. He left the queen and the throne behind him. He found his way to a hermit’s life and eventually entered the Brahma heaven. This Jataka has shown the Boddhisatta’s supreme perfection of perseverance.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sat Oct 26, 2013 6:32 pm

Sawaddee Ka....again!

After posting MahaJanaka Jataka, I thought about Shaunc's little daughter...she might like to watch this cute video while her dad telling the story:
MahaJanaka Jataka(ชนกชาดก) : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mg9vJW8_cBU

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Wed Oct 30, 2013 2:39 pm

MORA-JĀTAKA : The Beautiful Golden Peacock

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

I love this Mora-Jataka so much, I search for the famous Katha[Moraparitta-Katha] and a Thai cute video-clip to present to you all.
I think you all know that..Love Is A Many-Splendored Thing...love kills, love bites, love bleeds etc. But to me, love is so beautiful..I'm so lucky in love !! This jataka might be long but it is a great jataka with beautiful poems indeed..you don't want to miss even 1 sentence!!! :reading:

พระคาถาโมรปริต : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKfOZg4sUCg

Mora Jataka Thai Version(มหาโมรชาดก) : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SUkdq78sv6I

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MORA-JĀTAKA : The Beautiful Golden Peacock
[Sacredtext.com]


This story the Master told at Jetavana about a backsliding Brother. This Brother was led by some others before the Master, who asked, "Is it true, Brother, as I hear, that you have backslidden?" "Yes, Sir." "What have you seen that should make you do so?" "A woman drest up in magnificent attire." Then said the Master, "What wonder that womankind should trouble the wits of a man like you! Even wise men, who for seven hundred years have done no sin, on hearing a woman's voice have transgressed in a moment; even the holy become impure; even they who have attained the highest honour have thus come to disgrace--how much more the unholy!" and he told a story of the olden time.
________

Once upon a time, when Brahmadatta was king of Benares, the Bodhisatta came into this world as a Peacock. The egg which contained him had a shell as yellow as a kanikāra bud; and when he broke the shell, he became a Golden Peacock, fair and lovely, with beautiful red lines under his wings. To preserve his life, he traversed three ranges of hills, and in the fourth he settled, on a plateau of a golden hill in Dandaka. When day dawned, as he sat upon the hill, watching the sun rise, he composed a Brahma spell to preserve himself safe in his own feeding-ground, the charm beginning "There he rises":--

"There he rises, king all-seeing,
Making all things bright with his golden light.
Thee I worship, glorious being,
Making all things bright with thy golden light,
Keep me safe, I pray,
Through the coming day."

Worshipping the sun on this wise by the verse here recited, he repeats another in worship of the Buddhas who have passed away, and all their virtues:

"All saints, the righteous, wise in holy lore,
These do I honour, and their aid implore:
All honour to the wise, to wisdom honour be,
To freedom, and to all that freedom has made free."

Uttering this charm to keep himself from harm, the Peacock went a-feeding .So after flying about all day, he came back at even and sat or the he hilltop to see the sun go down; then as he meditated, he uttered another spell to preserve himself and keep off evil, the one beginning ."There he sets":--

"There he sets, the king all-seeing,
He that makes all bright with his golden light.
Thee I worship, glorious being,
Making all things bright with thy golden light.
Through the night, as through the day,
Keep me safe, I pray.

"All saints, the righteous, wise in holy lore,
These do I honour and their aid implore:
All honour to the wise, to wisdom honour be,
To freedom, and to all that freedom has made free."

Uttering this charm to keep himself from harm, the Peacock fell a-sleeping. Now there was a savage who lived in a certain village of wild huntsmen, near Benares. Wandering about among the Himalaya hills he noticed the Bodhisatta perched upon the golden hill of Dandaka, and told it to his son. It so befel that on a day one of the wives of the king of Benares, Khemā by name, saw in a dream a golden peacock holding a religious discourse.

This she told to the king, saying that she longed to hear the discourse of the golden peacock. The king asked his courtiers about it; and the courtiers said, "The Brahmins will be sure to know." The Brahmins said: "Yes, there are golden peacocks." When asked, where? they replied, "The hunters will be sure to know." The king called the hunters together and asked them. Then this hunter answered, "O lord king, there is a golden hill in Dandaka; and there a golden peacock lives." "Then bring it here--kill it not, but just take it alive."

The hunter set snares in the peacock's feeding-ground. But even when the peacock stepped upon it, the snare would not close. This the hunter tried for seven years, but catch him he could not; and there he died. And Queen Khemā too died without obtaining her wish. The king was wroth because his Queen had died for the sake of a peacock. He caused an inscription to be made upon a golden plate to this effect: "Among the Himalaya mountains is a golden hill in Dandka. There lives a golden peacock; and whoso eats of its flesh becomes ever young and immortal." This he enclosed in a casket.

After his death, the next king read this inscription: and thought he, "I will become ever young and immortal;" so he sent another
hunter. Like the first, this hunter failed to capture the peacock, and died in the quest. In the same way the kingdom was ruled by six
successive kings.

Then a seventh arose, who also sent forth a hunter. The hunter observed that when the Golden Peacock came into the snare, it did not shut to, and also that he recited a charm before setting out in search of food. Off he went to the marches, and caught a peahen, which he trained to dance when he clapped his hands, and at snap of finger to utter her cry. Then, taking her along with him, he set the snare, fixing its uprights in the ground, early in the morning, before the peacock had recited his charm. Then he made the peahen utter a cry. This unwonted sound--the female's note--woke desire in the peacock's breast; leaving his charm unsaid, he came towards her; and was caught in the net. Then the hunter took hold of him and conveyed him to the king of Benares.

The king was delighted at the peacock's beauty; and ordered a seat to be placed for him. Sitting on the proffered seat, the Bodhisatta asked,

"Why did you have me caught, O king?"

"Because they say all that eat of you become immortal and have eternal youth. So I wish to gain youth eternal and immortality by eating of you," said the king.

"So be it--granted that all who eat of me become immortal and have eternal youth. But that means that I must die!"

"Of course it does," said the king.

"Well--and if I die, how can my flesh give immortality to those that eat of it?

"Your colour is golden; therefore (so it is said) those who eat your flesh become young and live so for ever ."

"Sir," replied the bird, "there is a very good reason for my golden colour. Long ago, I held imperial sway over the whole world, reigning in this very city; I kept the Five Commandments, and made all people of the world keep the same. For that I was born again after death in the World of the Thirty-Three Archangels; there I lived out my life, but in my next birth I became a peacock in consequence of some sin; however, golden I became because I had aforetime kept the Commandments."

"What? Incredible! You an imperial ruler, who kept the Commandments! born gold-coloured as the fruit of them! A proof, prithee!"

"I have one, Sire."

"What is it?"

"Well, Sire, when I was monarch, I used to pass through mid-air seated in a jewelled car, which now lies buried in the earth beneath the waters of the royal lake. Dig it up from beneath the lake, and that shall be my proof."

The king approved the plan; he caused the lake to be drained, and dug out the chariot, and believed the Bodhisatta. Then the Bodhisatta addressed him thus:

"Sire, except Nirvana, which is everlasting, all things else, being composite in their nature, are unsubstantial, transient, and subject to living and death."

Discoursing on this theme he established the king in keeping of the Commandments. Peace filled the king's heart; he bestowed his kingdom upon the Bodhisatta, and showed him the highest respect. The Bodhisatta returned the gift; and after a few days' sojourn, he rose up in the air, and flew back to the golden hill of Dandaka, with a parting word of advice--"O king, be careful!" And the king on his part clave to the Bodhisatta's advice; and after giving alms and doing good, passed away to fare according to his deeds.
_________

This discourse ended, the Master declared the Truths, and identified the Birth:--now after the Truths the backsliding Brother became a Saint:--"Ānanda was the king of those days, and I myself was the Golden Peacock."

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Love this Mora-Jataka :heart:
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Wed Nov 06, 2013 2:12 pm

Tinnapala : The Luckiest Grass Harvester

Sawaddee Ka

Do you know what is Kathina? I must say that I've heard the word KATHINA/done Kathina merits many times..but never know the real meaning...like I always tell you all that I don't know much..but I know what love is unlike 'the Foreigner' who sang 'I Want To Know What Love Is' : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raNGeq3_DtM

And I have an amazing story to present to you all.

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Tinnapala : The Luckiest Grass Harvester
[From Dhammamediachannel]


อานิสงส์กฐิน-นายติณบาล Tinnapala : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvTUQy_TQLo

The Kathina is the jubilant moment which all Buddhists really want to offer robes to the Sangha, as it happened in the past in the story of Tinnapala, the grass harvester. In the lifetime of Buddha Kassapa, there was a nameless pauper who worked in the field, harvest grass for a millionaire. People called him Tinnapala, which means "the grass harvester". He worked for only daily support such as foods and beverages in a millionaire’s house. At the end of Buddhist lent, the millionaire wanted to offer robes in Kathina ceremony, so he told his family and his servants to join in offering Kathina-robes to the Sangha. Tinnapla heard that news and wanted to offer some robes but he did not have enough money to buy a robe. So, he gathered some leaves and sewed them together to be his cloth, then he sold his only cloth which he was wearing and able to buy only needles and threads to be the necessities for the monks to make robes. When the millionaire knew his action, instead of laughing at him, he praised him and put Tinnapala's needles and threads together with his grand kathina-offerings. Tinnapala's great merits reached Sakka, King of Tavatimsa heaven, heard his good deed then appeared in front of him, praised him and granted him 4 wishes.

In stead of wishing to be rich, Tinnapala wished four things; he wished: never to harm any females by actions/words/thought, never to be stingy in alms-giving/dhana, never to associate with fools, and he wished to have a virtuous wife. After Sakka blessed him, the king of the country also heard about his good deeds, sent his guard to invite Tinnapala to his palace and asked him to share this great merit. With his sharing merits to the king, the king rewarded Tinnapala lots of properties and money...a millionaire overnight!!

After death, Tinnapala was reborn into the Tavatimsa Heaven for a very long time.

In his final existence, during the time of the Gautama Buddha, Tinnapala was born into a nice family and was ordained as a bhikkhu, with his merits cultivated from his past lives, he finally attained the Arahatship.

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Kathina ประวัติ การรับผ้ากฐิน-อานิสงส์กฐิน : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fu8mj_dwPjE

Kathina Ceremony

At the end of Buddhist lent, it is the time of robe offering ceremony, Kathina. The Kathina ceremony comes every year and takes place in all temples across the country.

Kathina means embroidery frame which monks use to sew their robes; also it means the equipment for monks to get a new robe after having been used for a year. At the beginning, Lord Buddha only allowed Bhikkhus (Buddhist monks) to use only cloths remaining on cadavers of dead bodies. This is because Lord Buddha wanted Bhikkhus to live a simple life by understanding the true and only purpose of clothing; to keep the wearer comfortable and to provide protection from sunburn, wind damage or insect disturbance. However, it was not easy to find the abandoned clothes especially when there were more Bhikkhus. In addition, there were complicated processes from searching for peices of cloths, tailor them and dye them. Some laypeople knew this difficulty and tried to offer monks a new robe. Thus, the Lord Buddha allowed monks to take a new robe from laypeople at the Kathina ceremony.

Kathina Robe(ผ้ากฐิน)

The Kathina ceremony is done by offering the Kathna’s robes among the assembly of the monks in that temple. The abbot or the chief monk of that temple will unanimously arrange these robes to monks who have qualifications to receive Kathina; the qualifications are those who take a full vassa (three months rain retreat) in that temple, that temple must have at least five monks staying during that vassa. The Kathina will be arranged within one month after the end of Buddhist lent; thus, the Kathina ceremony is not the normal ceremony which can be taken place in any time but it is limited.

[From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]

Kathina In Thailand

Kathin (Thai: กฐิน) in Thailand (there is also the transcription "Gathin" in use) is the name for the robes of an ordained monk; the ceremony of Kathina is called Thod Kathin (Thai: ทอดกฐิน). The Thai lunar calendar reckons the day after the 11th full moon as Waning, Evening, Moon 11 (Thai: แรม ๑ ค่ำ เดือน ๑๑ Raem 1 Kham Deuan 11 ). The presentation of Kathin by the King of Thailand is called The Royal Kathin Ceremony and often has been an occasion for one of Thailand's Royal Barge Processions.

Image

Gathin Festival is a traditional Buddhist festival celebrated by villagers in Northeast Thailand (Issan, Isan, Esarn) and Laos(ບູນກັນທີນ). Colorful parades and offering ceremonies at the end of monks´ retreat at local temples. On Owk-Pansa day of the full moon, villagers and city dwellers will go to their local temple for prayers and paying respect to the sacred.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Wed Nov 13, 2013 2:14 pm

MahaKanha Jataka : The Devil Black Dog!

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

I love jataka stories very much. When I was very young, the teacher told us(pupils) to read a certain story at home for discussion in the next class. Yes I did read it!.. But I kept on reading more stories until I fell asleep with the jataka book by my pillow.

มหากัณหชาดก สุนัขดำกินคน.Thai version, MahaKanha : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6Vi5v9L6x8

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MahaKanha Jataka : The Devil Black Dog!
[Wisdom Library]


In the past, when the teachings of Kassapa Buddha were already forgotten, there ruled a king named Usinara. Monks and nuns lived in wickedness, and men followed evil paths, being born, after death, in the Niraya. Sakka, finding no one entering the deva worlds from among men, decided to scare the men into virtue. Assuming the guise of a forester and leading Matali disguised as a black fierce looking dog called Mahakanha, Sakka came to the city gates and cried aloud that the world was doomed to destruction. The people fled in terror into the city and the gates were shut. But the forester leapt over the city wall with his dog, the latter scaring everyone he saw. The king shut himself up in his palace, but the dog put his forefeet on the palace window and set up a roar, which was heard from the hells to the highest heavens. The forester said the dog was hungry, and the king ordered food to be given him. But he ate it all in one mouthful and roared for more. Usinara then asked the forester what kind of dog it was, and was told that the animal ate up all those who walked in unrighteousness, and described who the unrighteous were. Then having terrified everyone, Sakka revealed himself and returned to his heaven. The king and his people became virtuous, and Kassapas religion lasted for one thousand years more.

The story was told in reference to a conversation among the monks to the effect that the Buddha was always working for the good of others, never resting, never tiring, his compassion extended towards all beings. Matali is identified with Ananda .

The barking of Mahakanha was among the four sounds heard throughout Jambudipa.
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Usinara:

King of Benares in the time of Kassapa Buddha. He is mentioned in a list of kings who, although they gave great gifts, could not get beyond the domain of sense . He is, however, elsewhere mentioned as having been born in Sakkas heaven as a result of waiting diligently on brahmins and recluses.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:58 pm

Thera Anurudha And A Beautiful Angel

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

I found this cute story @facebook. Most Thai people are taught to say 'Anumodhana Sadhu', to be happy, to have great joy with other's meritorious deeds!! Never never say bad things against people's meritorious deeds.

สวรรค์ชั้นดาวดึงส์ Tavatimsa Deva World : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_DCNJnlfr-w

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Thera Anurudha And A Beautiful Angel
[ Translated from Thai story by yawares sastri]


Once, Thera Anurudha went to Tavatimsa World, he saw a very beautiful angel with her bling-bling vimana/celestial clothes/jewery etc.. The thera asked her what good deeds she had done to achieve such beauty appearance/beautiful vimana??

She said that when she was a human-being, she was the great upasika Visakha's friend. Though she was not as rich as Visakha, had not done great dhanas as often, but whenever Visakha did various maha-meritorious deeds to the Buddha and the Sangha, she always said anumodhana sadhu, sadhu, sadhu with great joy to Visakha's good-deeds. And she never envied anybody's great meritorious deeds. After her death, she was reborn in this Tavatimsa Heaven.

อนุโมทนาบุญอย่างเดียว : เรี่องมีอยู่ว่าวันหนึ่ง พระอนุรุทธ ท่านเข้าฌานเหาะไปสวรรค์ชั้นดาวดึงส์ เมื่อท่านพบวิมานหลังหนึ่งสวยสดงดงามมาก และเจ้าของวิมานก็สวยเช็งวับเลย ตามพระไตรปิฏกท่านพรรณาไว้อย่างนี้ว่า “ดูก่อนนางเทพธิดา เธอมีรูปสวยมาก ผิวพรรณก็ผ่องใสคล้ายเงินผสมแก้ว จะขยับเขยื้อนแพรวพราวไปทั้งร่าง แสงสว่างที่ออกจากกายก็สว่างไสวไปทั่วทิศ สว่างเหนือหรือมากกว่าดาวประกายพรึกเป็นไหนๆ เมื่อเธอฟ้อนอยู่ หรือการขับร้องเสียงที่เป็นทิพย์ก็ไพเราะมาก ช่างชื่นใจในน้ำเสียงของเธอเหลือเกิน กลิ่นที่เป็นทิพย์ก็หอมหวลยวนใจ เสียงเครื่องประดับกระทบกันก็ไพเราะมาก ขอพรรณาเท่านี้ก็พอ เพราะท่านชมไว้มากเหลือเกิน ท่านลงท้ายว่า เมื่อเป็นมนุษย์ทำบุญอะไรไว้ จึงสวยและเสียงไพเราะจับใจอย่างนี้” อาศัยโมทนาบุญ นางเทพธิดาตอบว่า “ข้าแต่ท่านผู้เจริญ เมื่อเป็นมนุษย์ฉันเป็นเพื่อนกับนางวิสาขามหาอุบาสิกา นางวิสาขาทำบุญไว้มากมหาศาล แต่ดิฉันไม่ได้ทำเลย เมื่อเห็นนางวิสาขาทำ ดิฉันก็มีความสุขไปด้วย และได้อนุโมทนากับบุญนั้น” นางวิสาขามหาอุบาสิกา ได้สร้างวิหารถวายสงฆ์ เธอเห็นวิหารนั้นมีใจเลื่อมใส ก็เลยโมทนา วิหารที่สวยสดงดงามที่พระคุณเจ้าเห็นอยู่นี้ เป็นผลบุญที่ฉันโมทนาที่นางวิสาขาสร้างถวายสงฆ์ วิมานนี้เป็นวิมานมหัศจรรย์ สวยสดงดงามมาก โดยรอบ ๑๖ โยชน์ เลี่อนลอยไปในอากาศได้ตามที่ฉันต้องการ ดิฉันมีปราสาทเป็นที่อยู่ อาศัยที่บุญอนุโมทนา จัดให้เป็นส่วนๆ งามรุ่งโรจน์ตลอดร้อยโยชน์ มุมหนึ่งของวิมานมีสระโบกขรณี เป็นที่อาศัยของปลาสวยๆ ทุกประเภท มีน้ำใสสะอาด มีทางลาดเพื่อเดินเล่นด้วยทรายทองคำ มีบัวสวยๆ ทุกชนิด เกสรบัวหอมฟุ้งไปทั่วทิศ บุญที่โมทนาทำให้มีต้นไม้รอบวิมานหลายชนิด เช่น มะพร้าว ไม้หว้า ขนุน ต้นตาล เป็นต้น เธอคุยฟุ้งตามความเป็นจริงพรรณาไม่ไหว สรุปแล้วผลที่เธอได้ เพราะอาศัยที่เธอเป็นมนุษย์ขี้เหนียว เอาแต่โมทนาบุญอย่างเดียว เป็นอันว่าคนฉลาดจะไม่มีโอกาสปราศจากบุญได้เลย ในเมื่อเราไม่มีทุนทำเอง เราก็โมทนาด้วยจิตบริสุทธิ์ ส่วนที่ทำเองก็ทำแล้วและโมทนาต่อด้วย หรือโมทนาแล้วทำเองด้วย จะช่วยให้มีความสุขมากกว่านี้ ท่านพระอนุรุทธท่านถามโฉมงามต่อไปว่า “เวลานี้นางวิสาขามหาอุบาสิกา ผู้ถวายวิหารทาน ไปอยู่ที่ไหน ?” นางฟ้าเธอตอบว่า “นางวิสาขามหาอุบาสิกาเธอมีทั้งทาน มีทั้งศีล จิตเจริญด้วยภาวนา เป็นมหาอุบาสิกาผู้ประเสริฐ เวลานี้ไปเกิดที่ชั้นนิมมานรดี เป็นชายาของท่านสุนิมมาตวดี” ........ .

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NOTE:

1.The great upasika Visakha was reborn in Nimanarati Deva World as the queen of Lord Sunimanarati of the Fifth Heaven.

2.Videha. A setthi in the time of Padumuttara Buddha persuaded his family/relatives to build a stupa for Padumuttara Buddha with ultimate love/admiration/saddha. He was a previous birth of the great Etadagga MahaKassapa Thera. His wife was Bhadda Kapilani.

Videha and the stupa : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPJ6-gPBOGw

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Thu Nov 28, 2013 3:50 pm

Guna Jataka : The Great Friendship

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

Again I watched this jataka @youtube...cute video..I love love it bad. I remember a great song about 'thank':

Wind beneath my wings: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rORCeBzaHeU

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Guna Jataka : The Great Friendship
[Sacredtexts.com]


Guna Jataka : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jZ8MNFWka0

Once upon a time, while Brahmadatta was king of Benares, the Bodhisatta was a Lion living in a cave on the hills. One day he came out from his lair and looked towards the mountain foot. Now all round the foot of that mountain stretched a great piece of water. Upon some ground that rose out of this was a quantity of soft green grass, growing on the thick mud, and over this mud ran rabbits and deer and such light creatures, eating of the grass. On that day, as usual, there was a deer eating grass upon it.

"I'll have that deer!" thought the Lion; and with a lion's leap he sprang from the hillside towards it. But the deer, frightened to death, scampered away belling. The Lion could not stop his onset; down on the mud he fell, and sank in, so that he could not get out; and there he remained seven days, his feet fixed like four posts, with not a morsel to eat.

Then a Jackal, hunting for food, chanced to see him; and set off running in high terror. But the Lion called out to him "I say, Jackal, don't run here am I, caught fast in the mud. Please save me!" Up came the Jackal. "I could pull you out," says he, "but I much fear that once out you might eat me." "Fear nothing, I wont eat you," says the Lion. "On the contrary, I'll do you great service only get me out somehow."

The Jackal, accepting this promise, worked away the mud around his four feet, and the holes wherein his four feet were fixed he dug further towards the water; then the water ran in, and made the mud soft. Then he got underneath the Lion, saying "Now, sir, one great effort," making a loud noise and striking the Lion's belly with his head. The Lion strained every nerve, and scrambled out of the mud; he stood on dry land. After a moment's rest, he plunged in the lake, and washed and scoured the mud from him. Then he killed a buffalo, and with his fangs tore up its flesh, of which he proffered some to the Jackal, saying, “Eat, comrade!” and himself after the Jackal had done did eat too. After this, the Jackal took a piece in his mouth. “What’s that for?” the Lion asked. “For your humble servant my mate, who awaits me at home.” “All right,” says the Lion, taking a bit for his own mate. “Come, comrade,” says he again, “Let us stay awhile on the mountain top, and then go to the lady’s house.” So there they went, and the Lion fed the she jackal; and after they were both satisfied, said he, “Now I am going to take care of you.” So he conducted them to the place where he dwelt, and settled them in a cave never to the entrance of his own.

Ever after that, he and the Jackal used to go a hunting together, leaving their mates behind; all kinds of creatures they would kill, and eat to their hearts’ content, and then bring back some for the two others. And as time went on, the she Jackal and the Lioness had each two cubs, and they all lived happily together.

One day, a sudden thought struck the Lioness. “My Lions seems very fond of the Jackal and his mate and young ones. What if there be something wrong between them! That must be the cause why he is so fond of them, I suppose. Well, I will plague her and frighten her, and get her away from this place.”

So when the Lion and the Jackal were away on the hunt, she plagued and terrified the Jackal’s mate, asking her why she stayed there, why she did not run away? And her cubs frightened the young jackals after the same fashion. The she Jackal told her mate what had been said. “It is clear,” said she, “that the Lion must have dropt a hint about us. We have been here a long time; and now he will be the death of us. Let us go back to the place where we lived before!”

On hearing this, the Jackal approached the Lion, with these words. “Master, we have been here a long time. Those who stay too long outstay their welcome. While we are away, your Lioness scolds and terrifies my mate, by asking why she stays, and telling her to begone; your young ones do the same to mine. If any one does not like a neighbour, he should just bid him go, and send him about his business; what is the use of all this plaguing?” So saying, he repeated the first stanza.

“The strong will always have their way; it is their nature so to do;

Your mate roars loud; and now I say I fear what once I trusted to.”

The Lion listened; then turning to his Lioness, “Wife,” said he, “you remember how once I was out hunting for a week, and then brought back this Jackal and his mate with me?” “Yes, I remember.” “well, do you know why I stayed away all that week?” “No, Sir.” “My wife, in trying to catch a deer, I made a mistake, and stuck fast in the mud; there I stayed for I could not get out a whole week without food. My life was saved by this Jackal. This my friend saved my life! A friend in need is a friend indeed, be he great or small. Never again must you put a slight upon my comrade, or his wife, or his family." And then the Lion repeated the second stanza.

"A friend who plays a friendly part, however small and weak he be,

He is my kinsman and my flesh and blood, a friend and comrade he;

Despise him not, my sharp fanged mate! This Jackal saved my life for me."

The Lioness, when she heard this tale, made her peace with the Jackal's mate, and ever after lived at amity with her and her young ones. And the young of the two pairs played together in their early days, and when the parents died, they did not break the bond of friendship, but lived happily together as the old ones had lived before them. Indeed, the friendship remained unbroken through seven generations.
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Now at the conclusion of the Truths, many bhikkhus attained Sotapatti Fruition, Sagitagami, Anagami and Arahatship. At that time the lion was the Buddha, the jackal was Ananda.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Wed Dec 04, 2013 4:50 pm

Asitabhu Jataka : Love? Who cared?

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

Ooh, I love this jataka so very much..Why women have to cry when husbands left..it's not the end of the world. Enjoy freedom!!


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Asitabhu Jataka : Love? Who cared?
[Wisdom Library]


The Bodhisatta was once a holy ascetic living in the Himalaya. At that time the king of Benares, growing jealous of his son Prince Brahmadatta, banished both him and his wife, Asitabhu. They went to the Himalaya and lived in a hut of leaves. One day the prince, becoming enamoured of a Candakinnari, followed her, forsaking his wife. (The kinnaris name was Canda).

Asitabhu went to the Bodhisatta and, having developed various superhuman powers, returned to her hut. Brahmadatta, having failed in his quest, returned to the hut where he found his wife poised in mid air uttering songs of joy over her newfound freedom. When she left, he lived in solitude till, at his fathers death, he succeeded to the throne.

I found someone : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m77bonzitos

The story was told in reference to a young girl, the daughter of a servitor of the two chief disciples. She was married, but finding her husband neglectful of her, visited the two Chief Disciples. Under their instruction she attained the First Fruit of the Path and embraced the religious life, ultimately becoming an arahant.

She was Asitabhu in the previous birth.


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The story is referred to in the Vibhanga Commentary (p.470f) in connection with a King of Benares who, having gone into the forest with his queen to eat roast flesh, fell in love with a kinnari and deserted his wife. When he returned to his queen he found her flying through the air away from him, having developed iddhi powers. A tree sprite then uttered a stanza, citing the example of Asitabhu.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Tue Dec 10, 2013 4:12 pm

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

I think most Buddhists read the story of Cincamanavika...but they might not know that this wicked woman used to be the Bodhisatta's wife/someone in his life, in many jatakas...believe it or not?? I'll present her stories to you all...1 by 1 :


Devil in disguise : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XL_aCUUMExQ

Cinca Manavika : Devil In Disguise
[Wisdom Library]


A paribbajika of some ascetic Order. When the heretics of this Order found that their gains were grown less owing to the popularity of the Buddha, they enlisted the support of Cinca in their attempts to discredit him. She was very beautiful and full of cunning, and they persuaded her to pretend to pay visits to the Buddha at Jetavana.

She let herself be seen going towards the vihara in the evening, spent the night in the heretics quarters near by, and in the morning men saw her returning from the direction of the vihara. When questioned, she said that she had passed the night with the Buddha. After some months she simulated pregnancy by tying a disc of wood round her body and appearing thus before the Buddha, as he preached to a vast congregation, she charged him with irresponsibility and callousness in that he made no provision for her confinement.

The Buddha remained silent, but Sakkas throne was heated and he caused a mouse to sever the cords of the wooden disc, which fell to the ground, cutting Cincas toes. She was chased out of the vihara by those present, and as she stepped outside the gate the fires of the lowest hell swallowed her up.

NOTE: In a previous birth, too, she had helped in various ways to harm the Bodhisatta.
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Maha Paduma Jataka : The She-Devil Queen

The Bodhisatta was once born as Mahapaduma, son of Brahmadatta, king of Benares. When Padumas mother died, his father took another wife. On one occasion the king had to leave the city to quell a border rising, and, thinking the dangers too great to take his queen with him, he entrusted her to the care of Paduma. The campaign was victorious.

In the course of making arrangements for the celebration of his fathers return, Paduma entered the queen's apartment. She was struck by his amazing beauty, and fell in love with him, inviting him to lie with her. On his indignant refusal, she feigned illness, and, on the return of the king, falsely accused him of having ill treated her. The king gave orders, in spite of the protestations of the people, that Paduma should be thrown from the Robbers Cliff. The deity of the mountain saved his life and entrusted him to the care of the Naga king, who took him to his abode, where he stayed for one year. Paduma then went to the Himalaya and became an ascetic.

The king heard of this and went to offer him the kingdom, but it was refused by Paduma. The king, convinced of the falsity of the charge brought against Paduma, caused the queen to be flung from the Robbers Cliff.

The story was related in reference to Cincamanavikas false accusations against the Buddha. Cinca was the wicked queen, Devadatta the king, Sariputta the deity, and Ananda the Naga.

************more jatakas coming soon.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Fri Dec 13, 2013 3:49 pm

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

This jataka might be long, but it is such an amazing story..hard to believe that the woman could be so bad..bad to the bone!


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CULLA-PADUMA-JĀTAKA : The Treacherous Heart
[Sacredtexts.com]


This story the Master told while dwelling at Jetavana about a backsliding brother. When this brother was asked by the Master whether he were really a backslider, he replied that he was. "Who," said the Master, "has caused you to backslide?" He replied that he had seen a woman dressed up in finery, and overcome by passion he had backslidden. Then the Master said, "Brother, womankind are all ungrateful and treacherous; wise men of old were even so stupid as to give the blood from their own right knee for them to drink, and made them presents all their life long, and yet did not win their hearts." And he told an old-world tale.

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Once upon a time, when king Brahmadatta reigned over, Benares, the Bodhisatta was born as his chief queen's son. They called him Prince Paduma, the Lotus Prince. After him came six younger brothers. One after another these seven came of age and married and settled down, living as the king's companions.

One day the king looked out into the palace courts, and as he looked he saw these men with a great following on their way to wait upon himself. He conceived the suspicion that they meant to slay him, and seize his kingdom. So he sent for then, and after this fashion bespake them.

"My sons, you may not dwell in this town. So go elsewhere, and when I die you shall return and take the kingdom which belongs to our family."

They agreed to their father's words; and went home weeping. "It matters not where we go!" they cried; and taking their wives with them, they left the city, and journeyed along the road. By and bye they came to a wood, where they could get no food or drink. And being unable to bear the pangs of hunger, they determined to save their lives at the women's cost. They seized the youngest brother's wife, and slew her; they cut up her body into thirteen parts, and ate it. But the Bodhisatta and his wife set aside one portion, and ate the other between them.

Thus they did six days, and slew and ate six of the women; and each day the Bodhisatta set one portion aside, so that he had six portions saved.

On the seventh day the others would have taken the Bodhisatta's wife to kill her; but instead he gave them the six portions which he had kept. "Eat these," said he; "to-morrow I will manage." They all did eat the flesh; and when the time came that they fell asleep, the Bodhisatta and his wife made off together.

When they had gone a little space, the woman said, "Husband, I can go no further." So the Bodhisatta took her upon his shoulders, and at sunrise he came out of the wood. When the sun was risen, said she--"Husband, I am thirsty!"

"There is no water, dear wife!" said he.

But she begged him again and again, until he struck his right knee with his sword, and said,

"Water there is none; but sit you down and drink the blood here from my knee." And so she did.


By and bye they came to the mighty Ganges. They drank, they bathed, they ate all manner of fruits, and rested in a pleasant spot. And there by a bend of the river they made a hermit's hut and took up their abode in it.

Now it happened that a robber in the regions of Upper Ganges had been guilty of high treason. His hands and feet, and his nose and ears had been cut off, and he was laid in a canoe, and left to drift down the great river. To this place he floated, groaning aloud with pain. The Bodhisatta heard his piteous wailing.

"While I live," said he, "no poor creature shall perish for me!" and to the river bank he went, and saved the man. He brought him to the hut, and with astringent lotions and ointments he tended his wounds.

Now when the man's wounds were growing together, the Bodhisatta had him to dwell there in the hut along with his wife, and he brought fruits of all kinds from the forest to feed both him and the woman. And as they thus dwelt together, the woman fell in love with the fellow, and committed sin. Then she desired to kill the Bodhisatta, and said to him, "Husband, as I sat on your shoulder when I came out from the forest, I saw yon hill, and I vowed that if ever you and I should be saved, and come to no harm, I would make offering to the holy spirit of the hill. Now this spirit haunts me: and I desire to pay my offering!"

"Very good," said the Bodhisatta, not knowing her guile. He prepared an offering, and delivering to her the vessel of offering, he climbed the hill-top.Then his wife said to him,

"Husband, not the hill-spirit, but you are my chief of gods! Then in your honour first of all I will offer wild flowers, and walk reverently round you, keeping you on the right, and salute you: and after that I will make my offering to the mountain spirit." So saying, she placed him facing a precipice, and pretended that she was fain to salute him in reverent fashion. Thus getting behind him, she smote him on the hack, and hurled him down the precipice. Then she cried in her joy, "I have seen the back of my enemy!" and she came down from the mountain, and went into the presence of her paramour.

Now the Bodhisatta tumbled down the cliff; but he stuck fast in a clump of leaves on the top of a fig tree where there were no thorns. Yet he could not get down the hill, so there he sat among the branches, eating the figs. It happened that a huge Iguana used to climb the hill from the foot of it, and would eat the fruit of this fig tree. That day he saw the Bodhisatta and took to flight. On the next day, he came and ate some fruit on one side of it. Again and again he came, till at last he struck up a friendship with the Bodhisatta.

"How did you get to this place?" he asked; and the Bodhisatta told him how.

"Well, don't be afraid," said the Iguana; and taking him on his own back, he descended the hill and brought him out of the forest. There he set him upon the high road, and showed him what way he should go, and himself returned to the forest.

The other proceeded to a certain village, and dwelt there till he heard of his father's death. Upon this he made his way to Benares. There he inherited the kingdom which belonged to his family, and took the name of King Lotus; the ten rules of righteousness for kings he did not transgress, and he ruled uprightly. He built six Halls of Bounty, one at each of the four gates, one in the midst of the city, and one before the palace; and every day he distributed in gifts six hundred thousand pieces of money.


Now the wicked wife took her paramour upon her shoulders, and came forth out of the forest; and she went a-begging among the people, and collected rice and gruel to support him withal. If she was asked what the man was to her, she would reply, "His mother was sister to my father, he is my cousin; to him they gave me. Even if he were doomed to death I would take my own husband upon my shoulders, and care for him, and beg food for his living!"

"What a devoted wife!" said all the people. And thenceforward they gave her more food than ever. Some of them also offered advice, saying, "Do not live in this way. King Lotus is lord of Benares; he has set all India in a stir by his bounty. It will delight him to see you; so delighted will he be, that he will give you rich gifts. Put your husband in this basket, and make your way to him." So saying, they persuaded her, and gave her a basket of osiers.

The wicked woman placed her paramour in the basket, and taking it up she repaired to Benares, and lived on what she got at the Halls of Bounty. Now the Bodhisatta used to ride to an alms-hall upon the back of a splendid elephant richly dight; and after giving alms to eight or ten people, he would set out again for home. Then the wicked woman placed her paramour in the basket, and taking it up, she stood where the king was used to pass. The king saw her. "Who is this?" he asked. "A devoted wife," was the answer. He sent for her, and recognised who she was. He caused the man to be put down from the basket, and asked her, "What is this man to you?"--"He is the son of my father's sister, given me by my family, my own husband," she answered.

"Ah, what a devoted wife!" cried they all: for they knew not the ins and outs of it; and they praised the wicked woman.

"What--is the scoundrel your cousin? did your family give him to you?" asked the king; "your husband, is he?"

She did not recognise the king; and "Yes, my lord!" said she, as bole as you like.

"And is this the king of Benares' son? Are you not the wife of prince Lotus, the daughter of such and such a king, your name so and so? Did not you drink the blood from my knee? Did you not fall in love with this rascal, and throw me down a precipice? Ah, you thought that I was dead, and here you are with death written upon your own forehead--and here am I, alive!" Then he turned to his courtiers. "Do you remember what I told you, when you questioned me? My six younger brothers slew their six wives and ate them; but I kept my wife unhurt, and brought her to Ganges' bank, where I dwelt in a hermit's hut: I hauled a condemned criminal out of the river, and supported him; this woman fell in love with him, and threw me down a precipice, but I saved my life by showing kindness. This is no other than the wicked woman who threw me off the crag: this, and no other, is the condemned wretch!" And then he uttered the following verses:


"’Tis I--no other, and this quean is she;
The handless knave, no other, there you see;
Quoth she--'This is the husband of my youth.'
Women deserve to die; they have no truth.

"With a great club beat out the scoundrel's life
Who lies in wait to steal his neighbour's wife.
Then take the faithful harlot by and bye,
And shear off nose and ears before she die."

But although the Bodhisatta could not swallow his anger, and ordained this punishment for them, he did not do accordingly; but he
smothered his wrath, and had the basket fixed upon her head so fast that she could not take it off; the villain he had placed in the same, and they were driven out of his kingdom.


----------------
When the Master had ended this discourse, he declared the Truths and identified the Birth:--at the conclusion of the Truths the backsliding Brother entered on the Fruit of the First Path:--"In those days certain elder was one of the six brothers, the young lady Ciñcā was the wife, Devadatta was the criminal, Ānanda was the Iguana, and King Lotus was I myself."

************More jatakas about Cincamanavika

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Mon Dec 16, 2013 5:34 pm

Vanarinda Jataka : The Monkey's Heart :heart:

Sawaddee Ka

Today, I have a funny jataka with cute video clip to present to you all. Yes, the female croc was Cincamanavika and the male croc was Devadatta...what a wicked couple!! ( I love my waterproof CROC SANDAL SHOES ).

วานรินทชาดกThai version : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3ylru4e ... qeghQJs_on

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Vanarinda Jataka : The Monkey's Heart :heart:
[Wisdom Library]


The Bodhisatta was once a monkey living on a river bank. On his way from one bank to another, he used to jump off and on a rock in midstream, and a female crocodile, living in the river, longed to eat his heart and asked her husband to get it.

So the crocodile lay on the rock, ready to catch the monkey as he jumped. The monkey noticing that, in spite of there being no tide, the rock was higher than usual, spoke to it and received no reply. His suspicions were then confirmed, and he said again, O rock, why dont you talk to me today ? The crocodile then revealed both his identity and his purpose, and the monkey resolved to outwit him. So he asked him to open his mouth, knowing that when a crocodile does this he shuts his eyes. So the crocodile did this, and the monkey jumped on to its back and from there to the other bank.

----------

NOTE: The story was related in reference to Devadattas attempt to kill the Buddha.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sat Dec 21, 2013 4:17 pm

Suvannakakkata Jataka : The She-Devil-Crow

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

In this jataka, Cincamanavika/Devadatta were husband/wife(crows)...What the she-devil-crow wanted to do this time??


Image

Suvannakakkata Jataka : The She-Devil-Crow
[Wisdom Library]


Once upon a time, the Bodhisatta was a brahmin farmer of Salindiya. On the way to his fields he passed a pond and grew friendly with a golden crab living in the pond. A she-crow longed to eat the farmers eyes, and persuaded her husband to induce his snake-friend to bite the farmer. This he did, and, overcome with the poison, the farmer fell near the pool.

Attracted by the noise, the golden crab emerged, and, seeing the crow about to peck out the farmers' eyes, caught the crow with his claws. When the snake came to the rescue of the crow, the crab fastened on him too. The crab made the snake suck the poison from the farmers'body, and, when the farmer was recovered and alive, the crab crushed the necks of both the snake and the crow and killed them.

The story was told in reference to Anandas'attempt to save the Buddha from the elephant (Dhanapala) sent by Devadatta to kill him, by standing between the elephant and the Buddha.

****Mara was the serpent, Devadatta, the crow, and Ananda, the crab. Cincamanavika was the female crow.

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NOTE: And the last... Vessantara Jataka...Cinca was Amittada the young wife of Jujaka(Devadatta).

Vessantara Jataka : http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=12707

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Tue Dec 24, 2013 5:13 pm

UMMADANTĪ-JĀTAKA : The Girl Of My Best Friend

Sawaddee Ka :heart: ...Tomorrow..Christmas Day : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgy8qeQE6uw

I remember that the Bodhisatta was also madly in love with Uppalavanna in Mutulakkana Jataka : http://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=11964

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UMMADANTĪ-JĀTAKA : The Girl Of My Best Friend : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Lm0QslYEXg

Image

This story the Master, while residing at Jetavana, told about a back-sliding Brother. The story runs that one day, as he was going his rounds in Sāvatthi for alms, he saw a woman of surpassing beauty, magnificently attired, and fell in love with her, and on returning home to his monastery he was unable to divert his thoughts from her. From that time, as it were, pierced with love's shafts and sick with desire he became as lean as a wild deer, with his veins standing out on his body. He no longer took delight in any one of the Four Postures, or found pleasure in his own thoughts, but giving up all the services due to a teacher he abandoned the use of instruction, inquiry and meditation. His fellow-monks brought him before the Master in the Hall of Truth, they said, he was a backslider. The Master asked if it were true, and on his confessing that it was so, the Master said, "Brother, sages of old, though ruling a kingdom, whenever lust sprang up in their hearts, passed under its sway for a time, but checked their roving thoughts and were guilty of no improper conduct." And with these words he related a story of the past.

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Once upon a time in the city of Aritthapura in the kingdom of the Sivis reigned a king named Sivi. The Bodhisatta came to life as the son of his chief queen, and they called him prince Sivi. His commander-in-chief also had a son born to him, and they named him Ahipāraka. The two boys grew up as friends and at the age of sixteen they went to Takkasilā, and, after completing their education, they returned home. The king made over his kingdom to his son, who appointed Ahipāraka to the post of commander-in-chief, and ruled his kingdom righteously.

In that same city dwelt a rich merchant, named Tirītavaccha, and he had a daughter, a very fair and gracious lady, bearing on her person every mark of auspicious fortune, and on her naming-day she was called Ummadantī. When sixteen years old she was as beautiful as a heavenly nymph, of more than mortal loveliness. All worldlings who beheld her could not contain themselves, but were intoxicated with passion. So her father, Tirītavaccha, drew nigh to the king and said, "Sire, at home I have a treasure of a daughter, a fit mate even for a king. Send for your fortune-tellers, who can read the lineaments of the body, and have her tested by them and then deal with her according to your good pleasure." The king agreed and sent his Brahmins to the merchant's house.

At this moment Ummadantī came into their presence, magnificently attired. On catching sight of her they completely lost their self-control, just as if they were intoxicated with passion. Every one was beside himself. When she saw them thus, she said, "They tell me, these fellows are to test the character of my marks," and she ordered them to be taken by the scruff of their neck and thrust out. And they were sorely annoyed and returned to the palace in a great rage with Ummadantī, and they said, "Sire, this woman is no mate for you: she is a witch." The king thought, "They tell me, she is a witch," and he did not send for her.

On hearing what had happened she said, "I am not taken to wife by the king, because they say I am a witch: witches forsooth are just like me. Very well, should I ever see the king, I shall know what to do." And she conceived a grudge against him. So her father gave her in marriage to Ahipāraka, and she was her husband's darling and delight.

Now in this city they proclaimed the Kattika festival, and on the day of full moon they decorated the city. Ahipāraka, on setting out for the post he had to guard, addressing her, said,"Lady Ummadantī, to-day is the Kattika festival; the king, in marching in solemn procession round the city, will first of all come to the door of this house. Be sure you do not shew yourself to him, for on seeing you he will not be able to control his thoughts." As he was leaving her, she said to him, " I will see to it." And as soon as he was off, she gave an order to her handmaid to let her know when the king came to the door. So at sunset, when the full moon had risen and torches were blazing in every quarter of the city, which was decorated as it were some city of the gods, the king arrayed in all his splendour, mounted on a magnificent car drawn by thoroughbreds and escorted by a crowd of courtiers, making a circuit of the city with great pomp, came first of all to the door of Ahipāraka's house. Now this house enclosed by a wall in colour like vermilion, furnished with gates and tower, was a beautiful and charming place.

At this moment the maid brought her mistress word of the king's arrival, and Ummadantī bade her take a basket of flowers, and standing near the window she threw the flowers over the king with all the charm of a sylph. And looking up at her the king was maddened with passion and quite unable to control his thoughts. On seeing how agitated he was she closed the window and went straight to her fair chamber. And from the moment when the king set eyes on her, he had no more thought of making solemn procession round the city. Addressing his charioteer he said, "Friend Sunanda, stop the chariot; this is not a festival suitable for us; it is fit only for Ahipāraka, my commander-in-chief, and the throne also is better suited for him," and stopping the chariot he climbed up to his palace.

From the moment that the king saw Ummadantī, he was beside himself with longing for her and lay on his couch raving about her. When his commander-in-chief Ahipāraka heard what had happened he offered his wife to the king, but King Sivi was too righteous to hear of accepting the gift, and by a supreme effort of will he overcame his infatuation for Ummadantī.

------------
The Master, having ended his lesson, revealed the Truth, and identified the Birth. At the end of the Truths the Brother was established in the First Path. At that time Ānanda was the charioteer Sunanda, Sāriputta was Ahipāraka, Uppalavannā was Ummadantī, the followers of Buddha were the rest of the courtiers, and I myself was king Sivi.

NOTE:

UMMADANTĪ's past life: Now as the result of what act of hers had she become so beautiful? By the gift of a scarlet robe.
In a former birth Ummadantī was born in a poor family of Benares, and on a certain festal day having seen some holy women clad in robes dyed scarlet with safflower she asked her parents for a similar robe. Realising that they were too poor to afford the gift, she worked for a long time for another family, and they finally gave her a robe. When she was about to don it, after a bath in the river, she saw a disciple of Kassapa Buddha standing without any proper clothes, his robes having been stolen from the river bank. She first gave him half her garment, then, seeing how radiant he looked in it, she gave him also the other half and uttered a prayer:

"Holy sir, I would fain in some future stage of existence be of such surpassing beauty, that no one who sees me may have power to control himself, and that no other woman may he more beautiful."

The elder returned her his thanks and went his way. After a period of transmigration in the world of gods, she was at this time born in Aritthapura and was as beautiful as she was described.

************

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Mon Dec 30, 2013 4:05 pm

SAMIDDHI-JĀTAKA : Pretty Nymph In Love

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

I love this jataka..a pretty nymph was in love with the Bodhisatta. I watched a few movies about angels fell in love with human-beings: Date With The Angel/Meet Joe Black/City of Angels.

Open your heart
: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWaT7gJxvfs

SAMIDDHI-JĀTAKA : Pretty Nymph In Love
[Sacredtexts.com]


Image

This story was told by the Master whilst he was staying in Tapoda Park near Rājagaha, about Elder Samiddhi, or Goodluck.
Once Father Goodluck had been wrestling in the spirit all night long. At sunrise he bathed; then he stood with his under garment on, holding the other in his hand, as he dried his body, all yellow as gold. Like a golden statue of exquisite workmanship he was, the perfection of beauty; and that is why he was called Goodluck.

A daughter of the gods, seeing the Elder's surpassing beauty, fell in love with him, and addressed him thus. "You are young, Brother, and fresh, a mere are with stripling, with black hair, bless you! you have youth, you are lovely and pleasant to the eyes. Why should a man like you turn religious without a little enjoyment? Take your pleasure first, and then you shall become religious and do what the hermits do!" He replied, "Nymph, at some time or other I must die, and the time of my death I know not; that time is hid from me. Therefore in the freshness of my youth I will follow the solitary life, and make an end of pain."

Finding she received no encouragement, the goddess at once vanished. The Elder went and told his Master about it. Then the Master said, "Not now alone, Goodluck, are you tempted by a nymph. In olden days, as now, nymphs tempted ascetics." And then at his request the Master told an old-world tale.

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Once upon a time, when Brahmadatta was king in Benares, the Bodhisatta became a brahmin's son in a village of Kāsi. Coming of years, he attained perfection in all his studies, and embraced the religious life; and he lived in Himalaya, hard by a natural lake, cultivating the Faculties and the Attainments.

All night long he had wrestled in the spirit; and at sunrise he bathed him, and with one bark garment on and the other in his hand, he stood, letting the water dry off his body. At the moment a daughter of the gods observed his perfect beauty, and fell in love with him. Tempting him, she repeated this first stanza:--

"Begging brother, do you know
What of joy the world can show?
Now's the time--there is no other:
Pleasure first, then--begging brother!"


The Bodhisatta listened to the nymph's address, and then replied, declaring his set purpose, by repeating the second stanza:--

"The time is hid--I cannot know
When is the time that I must go:
Now is the time: there is no other:
So I am now a begging brother."


When the nymph heard the Bodhisatta's words, she vanished at once.

--------
After this discourse the Master identified the Birth: "The nymph is the same in both stories, and the hermit at that time was I myself."

*************
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sat Jan 04, 2014 4:11 pm

Sawaddee Ka......Maccha Jataka !!

This jataka is so cute...very nice video/song too..

There's a danger in loving somebody too much
: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGmrxDpbOyU

Maccha มัจฉชาดก [Thai Version] : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZozhdFcs ... C&index=62

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Maccha Jataka : The Danger Of Passion
[Wisdom Library]


Some fishermen once cast their net into a river, and a great fish, swimming along, toying amorously with his wife, was caught in the net, while his wife escaped. The fishermen hauled him up and left him on the sand while they proceeded to light a fire and whittle a spit whereon to roast him. The fish lamented, saying how unhappy his wife would be, thinking he had gone off with another.

The Bodhisatta, who was the kings' priest, coming along to the river to bathe, heard the lament of the fish and obtained his freedom from the fishermen and put the fish back into the river.

The story was related to a passion tossed monk who longed for the wife of his lay days. The two fish were the monk and his seducer.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Fri Jan 10, 2014 2:59 pm

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

I love this jataka...wish I could meet and do meritorious deeds with Pacceka-Buddhas, Buddhas and their great disciples.


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Aditta Jataka : The Beautiful Couple
[Wisdom Library]


Once the Bodhisatta was born as Bharata, King of Roruva, in the country of Sovira. He was very righteous and much beloved, and his chief queen, Samuddavijaya, was wise and full of knowledge.

The king, wishing to give alms to Pacceka Buddhas instead of to others far less holy, consulted the queen, and acting on her advice, made proclamation to his people that they should keep the precepts. He himself observed all holy days and gave great gifts in charity.

One day he offered flowers to the eastern quarter, and making obeisance, wished that any Pacceka Buddha in that quarter might come to accept his alms. His wish not being fulfilled, he repeated, on the following days, the same ceremony to the other quarters till, on the fourth day, seven Pacceka Buddhas came to him from the north where they lived in Nandamulapabbhara. The king and queen fed them for seven days and gave them robes and all the other requisites of an ascetic. The Pacceka Buddhas departed one by one, each expressing his thanks in a stanza and exhorting the king and queen to lead pure lives.

The story was related in reference to King Pasenadis Asadisadana,to show that wise men of old also gave gifts to holy men, with discretion.

****The queen Samuddavijaya was Yasodhara(Rahulamata).

*********
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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Tue Jan 14, 2014 3:50 pm

Matuposaka Jataka : The Loving Son
Sawaddee Ka :hi:

In Thailand, this jataka and Saddan Jataka are the most popular jatakas that the Bodhisatta was born as white elephant. I did read this jataka first time when I was in junior high school.

มาตุโปสกชาดก Thai Version : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8MWM9DW ... LUHQ2sColx

Matuposaka Jataka : The Loving Son
[Translated by Ken and Visakha Kawasaki]

The Bodhisattva was born as the head of eighty thousand elephants. He adored his blind mother. Every day he collected wild fruit for her and gave it to other elephants to take them back to her. One day he found that the elephants were eating the fruit themselves and not feeding her. At night he left the herd along with his mother and went to a cave near a lake where he and his mother lived happily.

A forester lost his way and began lamenting. The Bodhisattva calmed him, fed him, and carried him out of the jungle on his back. The ungrateful forester went to the king and took money to tell them the whereabouts of the elephant. When the army arrived, the Bodhisattva thought 'I am large enough to scatter a thousand elephants. But if I give way to anger I shall destroy them and the rest will hunt down my herd and I will lose my virtue. So I shall be still.' He was captured and taken to Benaras where he was festooned and taken to the king. He refused to eat for two weeks and finally told the king he could not eat if his blind mother did not.

Seeing his love for his mother, the king realized this was a Great Being and freed him. He returned to his mother and looked after her. The King of Benaras served them both and had an image of the Bodhisattva made which became the centre of the elephant festival.[ The elephant in the rock at Dhauli represents the Bodhisattva of the story.]
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Dhauli hill holds the distinction of being the place where Emperor Ashoka renounced war and embraced Buddhism. Some believe it to be the sight where the Kalinga war was fought. The Elephant is the universal symbol of the Lord Buddha. Under the elephant is the famous Ashokan Rock edict. In the background is the Shanti Stupa.

Image

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Sat Jan 18, 2014 3:22 pm

Saddanta Jataka : The Revenge

Sawaddee ka :hi:

This story refered to a bhikkhuni who could recall her past lives, sometimes she laughed, sometimes she cried. Many bhikkhunis who saw the incident wondered why..and then the Buddha told her story. I tried to find the Thai video-clip..but no can find!


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Saddanta Jataka : The Revenge
[Translated by Ken and Visakha Kawasaki]


The Boddhisattva as Saddanta was the chief of a herd of 8000 elephants.He lived in a great golden cave in the monsoons and under the banyan tree in summer. His two consorts were Chullabhadra and Mahasubhadra. Chullabhadra became jealous and presumed that Saddanta loved Mahasubhadra more. So she stopped eating and prayed to be reborn as the queen of Benaras so that she could have Saddanta killed.

She was reborn as Subhadra, the princess of Madda and married the king of Benaras. Pretending to be sick, she said she could only get well if a six tusked white elephant were to be killed and his tusks brought to her. In the gathering of hunters she nominated an ugly hunter named Sonuttara and told him where to find Saddanta. She spent a large sum of money and made all the tools for Saddanta to be killed.

Sonuttara arrived at the place of the elephants, dug a huge pit, and covered it with grass. As the elephant passed he wounded him with a poisoned weapon. The elephant, mad with pain, got ready to kill the hunter, but he stopped when he saw the yellow robes of sainthood that he was disguised in. Calmly he asked why the hunter had come, and when Sonuttara replied that he had been sent to kill him by the queen of Benaras, Saddanta realized that this was his queen Subhadra reborn.

He offered himself to be killed. Since he was so tall, he offered his trunk. The hunter climbed on it and started cutting off his tusks. The elephants mouth filled with blood and he was in excruciating pain. But when the hunter could not saw through the mighty blades, the elephant sawed them off himself and told the hunter to give them to the queen. The hunter left and Saddanta died.

The hunter placed the tusks before the queen and, as she took them on her lap , her heart filled with terrible sorrow and, remembering his love and asking his forgiveness, she died. The story is depicted in the Sanchi stupa and at Ajanta.

****In Gautama Buddha Era.....Queen Subhadra reborn as a bhikkhuni and the hunter reborn as Devadatta.
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Sanchi Stupa is located at Sanchi Town in Raisen District of the state of Madhya Pradesh, India, it is located 46 km north east of Bhopal.

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The 'Great Stupa' at Sanchi is the oldest stone structure in India[1] and was originally commissioned by the emperor Ashoka the Great in the 3rd century BC. Its nucleus was a simple hemispherical brick structure built over the relics of the Buddha. It was crowned by the chatra, a parasol-like structure symbolising high rank, which was intended to honour and shelter the relics. The construction work of this stupa was overseen by Ashoka's wife, Devi herself, who was the daughter of a merchant of Vidisha. Sanchi was also her birthplace as well as the venue of her and Ashoka's wedding. In the 1st century BC, four profusely carved toranas or ornamental gateways and a balustrade encircling the whole structure was added
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Saddan & Hai Sin caves (Hpa An)

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Saddan Cave is a well known temple site southeast of Hpa An in Kayin State. Hai Sin is a smaller cave in the neighbouring hill.

Saddan means Royal Elephant and there are 2 stone elephants at the base of the stairway leading up to the cave. The entrance chamber has a large reclining Buddha as well as other statues and gold tablets on the walls. From here steps lead up into the main cave passage which is more or less a single passage with a short side passage almost half way through. There is an impressive chamber at the end with a huge stalagmite illuminated by daylight, and a nice view out.

Steps lead down to a lake. There is said to be a cave passage through the hill on the right which is navigable by boats. Walking across the padi fields leads to Haisin Gu (Tuskless Elephant Cave). The large entrance is visible in the base of the small tower. A mud slope leads up into the cave which is more or less a single passage containing some nice stal.

Both caves have lots of fauna – invertebrates and fruit bats.

The caves were surveyed on the 2009 expedition, Saddan is 800m and is the longest known cave in Kayin state and the 5th longest in Myanmar. Haisin is 300m.

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Re: Buddhaflowers inspirational tales

Postby tidathep » Tue Jan 21, 2014 4:09 pm

Matanga Jataka : The Pride And Prejudice

Sawaddee Ka :hi:

I really love this story...I think it's funny and very entertaining. It reminds me of Billy Joel's song :

Uptown Girl: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCuMWrfXG4E

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Matanga Jataka : The Pride And Prejudice
[by Ken and Visakha Kawasaki]


It was while staying at Jetavana that the Buddha told this story about King Udena.

In a previous existence, Venerable Pindola had been a king in Kosambi and had been very fond of the royal park there. Remembering this, during the hot season, he often used his supernatural power to travel through the air from Jetavana to spend the hottest part of the day in the cool shade of that park. One day, while Venerable Pindola was sitting under a magnificent sal tree in full flower and enjoying the bliss of his arahatship, King Udena entered the garden with his retinue. Since the king had been drinking steadily for the past week, he lay down in the arms of one of his women on the great royal stone and immediately fell asleep. When the women who were singing, playing instruments, and dancing realized that the king was asleep, they stopped and wandered around the garden. As they were picking fruit and gathering flowers, they came upon Venerable Pindola. They paid their respects and sat down to listen to his teaching.

The woman who was holding the king shifted her weight slightly and the king awoke. Not seeing the musicians, he cried, "Where have those good for nothing women gone without my permission?"

"They are over there, Sire," the woman said, pointing. "They have gathered around an ascetic and are listening to his teaching."

Enraged, the king stormed across the garden and confronted Venerable Pindola. "What do you think you are doing?" he shouted at the bhikkhu. "What right have you to sit here with the women of my court? I'll teach you!" He ordered that an entire basket of biting red ants be dumped on Venerable Pindola's body. Venerable Pindola, however, immediately rose into the air and admonished the king not to get angry and not to be so hasty. Then he returned to Jetavana and alighted at the entrance to the Buddha's Perfumed Chamber.

"Where have you come from?" asked the Tathagata. Venerable Pindola told him what had happened, and the Buddha replied, "Pindola, this is not the first time that King Udena has tried to harm a religious man. Long ago, too, he did the same thing." At Venerable Pindola's request, the Buddha told this story of the past.

To be continued...............

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